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Biographical Sketch of John Rowlee Fausey

JOHN ROWLEE FAUSEY – To the general advancement of the interests of the public schools of Massachusetts, and particularly of Springfield and West Springfield, Mr. Fausey has devoted the larger part of his career as a teacher and superintendent, and with results that are recorded as having enlarged the bounds and increased the value of the educational institutions in those communities where he has taught and held official position. John Rowlee Fausey, son of James Seldon and Caroline Helen (Blauvelt) Fausey, was born March 19, 1870, in Elmira, New York, where he attended the public school, and he afterwards graduated at Genessee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, New York, in the class of 1893, In 1893-1895 and 1896-1897, he was a student at Syracuse University, where he later received his degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Fausey at once entered upon his career as an educator, and during 1898-1899 he was both teacher and principal at Galeton, Pennsylvania; at Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1899-1902; and at Norwich, Connecticut, in 1902-1905. Mr. Fausey went to Springfield as principal of the Howard Street School of that city in 1906, and he continued in that position until 1912, when he went to West Springfield as superintendent, so continuing to 1918. From 1918 to 1923, he served as superintendent at Winchester, Massachusetts. In 1923 he was recalled to the West Springfield superintendency, which he has held to the present. John Rowlee Fausey married, December 26, 1899. in Syracuse, New York, Lena May...

Biography of Israel Newton

ISRAEL NEWTON-The Newton family of Orange is one of the oldest New England families on record, the first American ancestor of whom we have positive knowledge having come to the shores of New England in the early autumn of 1639. He was one of the four men who came with Roger Ludlow, deputy governor, who had obtained a commission from the General Court of Connecticut to begin a plantation at Poquonock. Thomas Newton moved to Newton, Long Island, in 1636, and in 1645 was chosen as representative from Fairfield to the General Court. Deacon Israel and Lois T. Newton had an only son Asa, who reached the age of manhood, and on January 23, 1777, married Lydia Worthington, a daughter of Colonel Elias Worthington, of the same town, who was born October 22, 1760. They were the parents of nine children: 1. Elias W., born November 16, 1780. 2. Asa, born October 3, 1782. 3. Rhoda, born January 28, 1785. 4 Lydia, born January 21, 1788. 5. Sally, born April 2, 1791. 6. Israel, of whom further. 7. Louisa, born January 23, 1796. 8. Joel W., born May 29, 1799. 9. Laura M., born February 15, 1802. Israel Newton, born February 11, 1794, was a farmer and a deacon of the Congregational Church for fifty years. He was a native of Colchester, Connecticut, where he died. On January 14, 1819, he married Harriet Turner, and they had seven children: I. Abby, born October 11, 1821. 2. Asa, born July 9, 1824. 3. Maria, born August 9, 1827. 4. Matthew Turner, of whom further. 5. Lydia Louise, born November 2%,...

Biographical Sketch of James T. Brown

JAMES T. BROWN, manager of the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, Massachusetts, was born in Luzeme, New York, February 24, 1885. His father was William E. Brown, and his mother Jennie I. (Taylor) Brown. The father was engaged in the mill business at Norwich, and also conducted a tannery. The family removed from the New York village where the early years of Mr. Brown were passed, to Norwich, Connecticut, when he was twelve years old. There the boy attended the public schools. He completed his studies to become a hotel employe, and his chosen occupation he has followed steadily through life. After many successful ventures he became manager of the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, in 1922, and has continued in that capacity ever since. He is also manager and director of the Worthy Inn, at Manchester, Vermont, a place he has filled since 1919. In October, 1924, Mr. Brown became the lessee of the Hotel Draper, at Northampton, Massachusetts, adding that noted resort to his other properties. Mr. Brown is a member of the Oxford Country Club; and of the Masonic Club. His fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Masonic fraternity, in which he has received the thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite. He is a member of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and of Bela Grotto, Springfield, Massachusetts. Mr. Brown married, in Providence, Rhode Island, January 3, 1908, Julia F. Lyon, step-daughter of John Lyon and daughter of Mary Lyon. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are the parents of Muriel E., born December 7, 1910; William E., born November 7,1913; James T., Jr.,...

Biography of William L. Learned

WILLIAM L. LEARNED AN ALBANY jurist whose long and interesting career has reflected no little credit upon himself as well as upon the city of his adoption, is the Hon. William Law Learned, of the supreme court. He was born on the 24th of July, 1821, at New London, Connecticut, and is the son of Ebenezer Learned and Lydia Coit, his second wife. His ancestry is of English origin. His ancestors emigrated to this country at an early day, and settled in Charlestown, Mass. The first admission to the First church of Charlestown was that of his ancestor, William Learned, in 1632. Both his grandfathers, Amasa Learned and Joshua Coit, were men of excellent character, learning and ability in their day; and both of them were members of congress about the beginning of the present century. The father of the present judge was for many years a practicing lawyer, and later in life became a cashier in one of the state banks of Connecticut. He was a man of sound and excellent judgment, and of the purest integrity. At an early age he was graduated from Yale College, and after teaching school for a few years he entered in the practice of his profession at New London. In the pleasant town of New London, William L. Learned spent his earliest years, under the careful and tender instruction of intelligent and loving parents. He early manifested a strong taste for learning, and the highest ambition of his boyhood was to become, like his father, a good lawyer. He first attended the union school at New London, where he enjoyed the...

Western Niantic Tribe

Western Niantic Indians. An Algonquian tribe formerly occupying the coast of Connecticut from Niantic bay to the Connecticut river. De Forest concluded that they once formed one tribe with the Rhode Island Niantic, which was cut in two by the Pequot invasion. Their principal village, also called Niantic, was near the present town of that name. They were subject to the Pequot, and had no political connection with the eastern Niantic. They were nearly destroyed in the Pequot war of 1637, and at its close the survivors were placed under the rule of the Mohegan. They numbered about 100 in 1638, and about 85 in 1761. Many joined the Brotherton Indians in New York about 1788, and none now exist under their own name. Kendall1 states that they had a small village near Danbury in 1809, but these were probably a remnant of the western Connecticut tribes, not Niantic. According to Speck2 several mixed Niantic Mohegan live at Mohegan, Connecticut, the descendants of a pure Niantic woman from the mouth of Niantic river. Their voices are commonly said to have been high-pitched in comparison with those of their neighbors.FootnotesKendall, Tray., 1809 ↩Speck, inf’n,...

Pequot Tribe

Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern coast Indians to this body of Mohegan invaders, who came down from the interior shortly before the arrival of the English. The division into two distinct tribes seems to have been accomplished by the secession of Uncas, who, in consequence of a dispute with Sassacus, afterward known as the great chief of the Pequot, withdrew into the interior with a small body of followers. This body retained the name of Mohegan, and through the diplomatic management of Uncas acquired such prominence that on the close of the Pequot War their claim to the greater part of the territory formerly subject to Sassacus was recognized by the colonial government. The real territory of the Pequot was a narrow strip of coast in New London County, extending from Niantic River to the Rhode Island boundary, comprising the present towns of New London, Groton, and Stonington. They also extended a few miles into Rhode Island to Wecapaug River until driven out by the Narraganset about 1635. This country had been previously in possession of the Niantic, whom the Pequot invaded from the north and forced from their central position, splitting them into two bodies, thenceforth known as Eastern Niantic and Western Niantic. The Eastern Niantic put themselves under the protection of the Narraganset, while the western branch...

Mohegan Tribe

Mohegan Indians (from maïngan, ‘wolf.’ Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe whose chief seat appears originally to have been on Thames river, Conn., in the north part of New London county. They claimed as their proper country all the territory watered by the Thames and its branches north to within 8 or 10 miles of the Massachusetts line, and by conquest a considerable area extending north and east into Massachusetts and Rhode Island, occupied by the Wabaquasset and Nipmuc. On the west their dominion extended along the coast to East river, near Guilford, Conn. After the destruction of the Pequot in 1637 the Mohegan laid claim to their country and that of the western Nehantic in the south part of New London county. The tribes west of them on Connecticut river, whom they sometimes claimed as subjects, were generally hostile to them, as were also the Narraganset on their east border. The Mohegan seem to have been the eastern branch of that group of closely connected tribes that spread from the vicinity of Narragansett bay to the farther side of the Hudson, but since known to the whites the eastern and western bodies have had no political connection. At the first settlement of New England the Mohegan and Pequot formed but one tribe, under the rule of Sassacus, afterward known as the Pequot chief Uncas, a subordinate chief connected by marriage with the family of Sassacus, rebelled against him and assumed a distinct authority as the leader of a shall band on the Thames, near Norwich, who were afterward known in history as Mohegan. On the fall of Sassacus in 1637...

The Defense of Stonington, Connecticut

Accounts the attack and defense of Stonington Connecticut during the War of 1812. Included will be found a muster-roll of the Borough company of militia, the official account furnished for publication by the magistrates, warden and burgesses; and a letter from Capt. Amos Palmer, chairman of the citizens’ committee of defense, to Mr. Crawford, secretary of war, containing a concise narrative of the action.

New London County, Connecticut Census

1790 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 New London County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 New London County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1840 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1850...

New London County, Connecticut Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. The following cemeteries are hosted by Connecticut Tombstone Transcription Project Old Church Cemetery Union Cemetery Cedar Grove Cemetery Chipman-Fish Cemetery Gallup Cemetery Following pages hosted at New London County USGenWeb Project) Hough-Harris Cemetery Old Burying Ground Ponemah Cemetery Exeter Cemetery Trumbull Cemetery Allen-Satterlee Cemetery Levi Chapman Cemetery Bailey Cemetery Nathaniel Bellows Cemetery Fanning Cemetery Ledyard Center Pleasant View Cemetery Selden Cemetery (Hadlyme) Cedar Grove Cemetery (Info Only) Beebee Cemetery North Stonington Cemeteries Norwich Cemeteries Guile Cemetery Haskell Cemetery Small Pox and Indian Cemetery Safford Cemetery Brown Cemetery Old Poquetanock Fobes-Amos Cemetery Davis Cemetery Gore Cemetery Crary Cemetery Long Society Cemetery Palmer Cemetery Brewster Cemetery Killam Cemetery Bentley-Sholes Lathrop Cemetery Fox Cemetery Cockle Hill Cemetery Harris Cemetery Wesley Brown Cemetery Ancient Burial Ground (older graves) Gallup Cemetery Kennedy Cemetery Old Kinne Cemetery Old Church Cemetery Union Cemetery- Quaker Hill Mullin Hill Cemetery Following pages hosted at Interment) Exeter Cemetery (partial) Trumbull Cemetery (partial)...
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