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Biography of David Hawes

David Hawes, the subject of this biography, father of Major Chas. W. and Frank B. Hawes, was born in Belchertown, Massachusetts, October 19, 1809, and died in Rock Island, Illinois, April 20, 1900, aged ninety years six months and one day. In all that makes for good citizenship, it may be truly said that David Hawes was a model. He was one of the earliest settlers of Rock Island His grandfather, John Hawes, was a Revolutionary soldier, fighting with the American patriots at Lexington and Bunker Hill, and later participating in the capture of Ticonderoga, being wounded in this latter engagement. David Hawes resided in Massachusetts until 1835, when, in company with Lemuel Andrews, his brother-in-law, he set his face westward. He reached St. Louis a month later, and in October of 1835, arrived in Rock Island. Rock Island, at the time of his arrival here, was a trading post for the Sac and Fox Indians. There were but ten houses in the village inhabited by white men. In December of 1835, Mr. Hawes returned to St. Louis, overland, accompanied by Mr. Andrews. They followed the old Indian or “Cow” trail. The trip was one filled with hardships. Lost in a blizzard, Mr. Andrews almost succumbed and Mr. Hawes struggled through the storm to the nearest settlement. Mr. Andrews was rescued in the nick of time. In January of 1836, Mr. Hawes returned to Massachusetts from St. Louis, and returned to Illinois, accompanied by his wife, who was Miss Julia M. Babcock, of Ware, Massachusetts, locating at Naples. He engaged in the hotel business at that point for a...

Biography of Mrs. Mary E. Burbank

MRS. MARY E. BURBANK. – The wife of Honorable A.R. Burbank was born near Milford, Delaware, January 14, 1827, and is the daughter of Jesse E. and Ellen Eckles. While but a child of sixteen months, she was bereft of her mother by death, and was intrusted to the care of her sable nurse until three years old. At this date she moved with her father and his family of three daughters and two sons to the far West, crossing the Alleghany Mountains in wagons, and settling at Clarkesburgh, Ohio, in the fall of 1830, residing there five years. As the Eden of their expectations had not been reached, this place was left for amore distant seat in Illinois; and a settlement was made upon a farm near Naples. Here she was afflicted by the death of her father, which occurred June 17, 1837; and she was left to the care of her sisters. At the age of seventeen she was united in marriage to Augustus R. Burbank, the ceremony being celebrated May 1, 1845, at the town of Jacksonville, by the Reverend Chancey Hoberts, at the house of Hicholas and Ann Milburn, – parents of Reverend W.M. Milburn, “the blind man eloquent,” and so often chaplain in Congress. She resided six years of her married life in Naples, and spent two years at Bloomington, Illinois. With her husband she came via the Isthmus of Nicaragua to Oregon, arriving in Portland May 30,1853. The first home was made at Lafayette, but in 1857 a removal was made to Portland. Mrs. Burbank is still remembered as the first church organist...

Biography of Hon. A. R. Burbank

HON. A.R. BURBANK. – Mr. Burbank, a founder of society and business upon the Pacific coast, was born April 15, 1817, near Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the son of Major Daniel Burbank, an American officer in the war of 1812, who came with his family in an open boat down the Alleghany and Ohio rivers as early as 1814, and made a home on its northern shore near the present metropolis. The Major was from Williamstown, Massachusetts. His wife, Margeret Pinchen, was from Atica, New York. In 1818 a further move was made in the family boat down the Ohio to Shanetown, Illinois, thence to McLanesburgh, and in 1825 to Exeter, Morgan county, in the same state. Here, at the age of nine, A.R. Burbank, the subject of this sketch, who was the youngest of a family of six sons and five daughters, met with the loss of his mother by death, and six years later was called upon to bid his father the last farewell, and follow his body to its resting place in the grave. Having received very careful religions and moral training from his parents, and having acquired habits of thrift and industry, he began while still a boy to make a career and carve out for himself a fortune. As a clerk in a store he acquired an insight into and a grasp upon business affairs. At the age of twenty-six he rose to the position of partner in the firm of Hollandbush & Burbank, which did a heavy business in the town of Naples, Illinois. At the age of twenty-eight, on May 1, 1845,...

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