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Biographical Sketch of David Howard

David Howard, of Mount Sterling, Ky., married first to Margaret Fourt, and settled on Charrette creek, in Warren County, 1819. His children were James, Peter, Thomas, Polly, John, and Jackson. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Howard married the widow McCutchen, whose maiden name was Rebecca Caton. By her he had Elizabeth, George, and Naoma. Mr. Howard was a great hunter and sugar maker, and made the best maple sugar in the country. He was also a zealous Methodist, and his name is prominently identified with the early history of that church in his county. His son, John Howard, is at present Sheriff and Collector of Warren...

Biography of Col. John Colgate Bell

COL. JOHN COLGATE BELL. – Colonel Bell, enjoying a wide reputation from Southern Oregon to Idaho, and back again to the Pacific seashore throughout the state in which he has successively lived and made a multitude of personal acquaintances, merits a special recognition on account of his public services in official relations and in the early Indian wars of Southern Oregon. He was born at Sterling, Kentucky, February 24, 1814. His parents were from Virginia; and among his ancestors were those distinguished in the early history of the nation, his father having served with General Harrison in the war of 1812. The young man received his education at the Mount Sterling Academy, and began business at his native town in the dry-goods store of David Herren. In 1834, he began his western career by removing with his father to Missouri, engaging with him in mercantile business at Clarksville, Pike county. Eight years later he entered into business on his own account at Weston, and in 1845 was married to Miss Sarah E., daughter of General Thompson Ward, of honorable fame in the Mexican war. In 1847 he was engaged with the General in organizing the regiments of Donovan and Price and the battalion of Major Powell sent to new Fort Kearney on the plains for the protection of emigrants. It was in these operations that he received his military rank. In 1849 he gratified his desire for a life wider than that of the east by setting forth with Doctor Belt, a brother-in-law, for the El Dorado of the Pacific. The journey was accomplished amid the usual difficulties of...

Biography of Hon. William R. Downey

HON. WILLIAM R. DOWNEY. – There are few men who are more familiarly and favorably known to the old pioneers of Puget Sound than the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. His father was a Revolutionary hero, having followed General Washington in the battles waged by the colonists for freedom from the oppression of Great Britain. Mr. Downey was born in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, March 6, 1808. At the age of three years he accompanied his parents to Hopkins county, and while living there received his education. On February 12, 1829, he was united in marriage to Miss Emily S. Wetzel. Twelve children were born to them, four of whom now survive. In 1850 he, with his family, removed to Dade county, Missouri. In the spring of 1853 they started to the far-off West, and arrived on Puget Sound October 15th of that year, locating a home on the Nisqually Plains. On the breaking out of the Indian war of 1855-56, he was obliged with other settlers to abandon his home and seek protection for his family in the fort erected at Steilacoom, where they remained until the cessation of hostilities. In common with his neighbors, he shouldered his gun and enlisted for the campaign, serving in all the engagements until 1857, when the Indians were subjugated and peace restored. On the return of the settlers to their homes, school districts were organized; and Mr. Downey was chosen as one of the directors of the district in which he resided. He has also been county commissioner of Pierce county, and in 1864 was elected by her citizens as their...

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