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Biography of Herbert Miller

Herbert Miller, president of the State Bank of Admire, and one of the very successful and influential farmers, bankers and business men of Lyon County, is one of the comparatively few men who have passed their sixtieth birthday and who can claim nativity in the commonwealth of Kansas. Of good English stock, of people who settled in America before the American Revolution, he was born in Osage County, Kansas, February 26, 1856. His ancestors located in the Province of New Brunswick, Canada, and it was there that his father Richard Miller was born in 1829. Shortly after his marriage he came to the United States in 1849, and after living five years in Wisconsin moved to Osage County, Kansas, in 1855 and in 1856, the year Herbert Miller was born, established a home on the frontier in what is now Lyon County, but was then Breckenridge County. He died there, after some years of activity as a farmer and stockman, in 1864. After becoming a citizen of the United States he voted the whig party until the organization of the republican party, and was a loyal adherent of that political faith. He was a strong temperance advocate before that cause was so popular as it is now, and was an active member of the Methodist Church. Though past the age for military service, he was a member of the Kansas State Militia during the Civil war, and was once called out during Price’s raid into Missouri. Richard Miller married Esther Schrivner, who was born in New Brunswick in 1830 and died in Lyon County, Kansas, in 1888. A brief...

Biography of George Pierson Morehouse

George Pierson Morehouse has a place among the prominent and well known public men of Kansas due to an exceptional range of interests and activities. His life had touched agricultural and business affairs, and had bad its influence in the political, legal and literary life of the West. For many years he lived at Diamond Springs or Council Grove in Morris County, but at present resided in Topeka, though he still spends considerable time upon the large stock farm known as the old “Morehouse Ranche” at Diamond Springs, which he owned and upon which the family settled nearly fifty years ago. At that time, the Kansa or Kaw Indians were on their reservation nearby, and going back and forth to the great buffalo ranges only two days drive to the westward. Large herds of long-horned cattle were driven along the old Santa Fe trial and the Kaw Indian trail, guarded by the then simon-pure festive cow-boy; the only settlers were few, scattered and located along the watered and wooded streams; and the vast sea of luxuriant prairie grass between the water courses died unused and became the dangerous food for the conflagrations which annually swept over that region. Game also was very plentiful. Inured to the many rigors of frontier life of that period, George P. Morehonse grew to manhood and became expert as a hunter and horseman. Money procured from the sale of furs, skins and wolf pelts bought clothes, school books and other luxuries. The terms of the district school on Diamond Valley at that time were short and primitive, but with the required preparation, principally by...

Biography of Charles S. Walker

The Farmers Union of Kansas is a branch of the great national organization known as The Farmers Educational and Co-operative Union, with business headquarters at Atlanta, Georgia. C. S. Barrett is president of the national organization. This organization had a membership of 2,500,000, located in thirty-one different states. The head office of the Kansas organization is at Salina, and the president of The State Farmers Union is Maurice McAuliffe, while the manager, with headquarters at Kansas City, Kansas, is Mr. Charles S. Walker. The Kansas Union had 50,000 members, and had undoubtedly been the greatest single factor in creating a stability of values, an equalization of opportunities, and a general strengthening of the agricultural interests in competition with so many other organizations which now dominate the field of industry and commerce. The Farmers Union of Kansas had its birth about 1907. Out of this had grown the Kansas Jobbing Association, organized about 1912. This association operates 200 elevators and had fifty-seven co-operative stores and about fifty produce stations, and through this association direct benefits of higher prices and better marketing conditions are brought to Kansas farmers, as similar organizations in the Far West have benefitted the orange growers and other producers. In 1916 the total volume of business transacted through the Jobbing Association amounted to a hundred million dollars. The organization is made up of progressive farmers and through its work the agricultural interests are rapidly learning the principle that in union there is strength. Mr. Charles S. Walker, manager of the union, is himself a practical and successful Kansas farmer. He was born on a farm in Morris...

Biography of James S. Adam

James S. Adam has been a prominent factor in business affairs at Dunlap for the past fifteen years, and is regarded as the banker of the village. He was born in Kirkentelloch, Scotland, March 12, 1870, a son of William and Mary Adam. The father was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1832, and brought his family to America in 1880, settling in White City, Kansas. From there he removed to Parkerville, in 1894, and lived there until his death, in 1896. He was a farmer and stockman. Ten years old when brought to this country, James S. Adam had his early training in the schools of Scotland, and then grew up on his father’s farm in Kansas until he was about eighteen. His first ambition was for railroad work, and becoming an operator he was stationed at various points along the line of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway, both in Oklahoma and Kansas. Since 1902 his home had been at Dunlap, where at first he was active as a merchant and is still largely interested in the leading general store. In 1905 he took the executive post of cashier in the Dunlap Farmers Bank and had since successfully managed the affairs of this institution. Mr. Adam is a democrat and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and belongs to the Kansas State Bankers’ Associations and the American Bankers’ Association. He is a trustee and steward in the Methodist Church. In 1894, In Council Grove, Kansas, Mr. Adam married Miss Annie...

Biography of William Eugene Peddycord

William Eugene Peddycord. No individual in a community wields a greater influence in the molding and shaping of character than does the educator, and the capable, conscientious instructor often stands nearer to the hearts of the people than does their spiritual guide. On entering the schoolroom the child’s mind is as plastic clay and is as readily made to take shape in the skilled hands of the educator. It is for this reason that the individuals who have charge of the education of the children of a community should be chosen with the greatest care; their responsibilities are grave and important–their acquirements and characters should be beyond reproach. In the person of William Eugene Peddycord, the people of Elk Falls have a superintendent of schools who possesses the necessary qualifications for the proper instruction of the young. He is the possessor of an excellent education; and as a young man of exemplary habits his influence and example should prove beneficial to the youths placed in his charge. Mr. Peddycord was born at Wilsey, Morris County, Kansas, September 29, 1892, and is a son of L. M. and Mary (Schenck) Peddycord. He is of Scotch-Irish descent, and on the paternal side the family traces its ancestry back to colonial Pennsylvania. His grandfather, the Rev. Nathan T. Peddycord, was born in 1834, in Ohio, and the fact that he was a minister of the gospel did not prevent him from participation in the Civil war as a soldier of the Union army. As a young man he had joined the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and when his military duties...

Yeakley, Ralph P. – Obituary

Funeral services for Ralph P. Yeakley, a senior citizen at St. Elizabeth hospital, 80 years of age will be conducted at 2 p.m. Tuesday, September 19 at West and Co. Memorial Chapel. The Rev. Joe Jewett of the First Christian Church will officiate. Interment will follow at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mr. Yeakley was born April 8, 1887 at Dunlap, Kansas, the son of Isaac and Rosa Druman Yeakley. With his family, he came across the plains from Kansas to Oregon in a covered wagon when only a small child. He has lived in Baker and Baker County for the past 72 years. Hs mother and father died when he was a young boy and he was reared by Abe and Lulu Sullivan. He was a long time rancher in the Bridgeport area and was married to his wife, Gladys Coyle Yeakley in Baker on November 7, 1907. He is survived by his daughter, Grace Hurse of Baker, five granddaughter, Virginia Wright, Theora Hambleton, Helen Alexander, all of Baker and Evelyn Greenwood of Union; a grandson Leslie Hurse of Pendleton; a brother, Clifford Yeakley and a sister, Gladys Hardesty both of Baker; and ten great grandchildren. Source: Baker Democrat Herald, Baker City, Oregon, September 18, 1967, page...

Kansa Tribe

Kansa Indians. A southwestern Siouan tribe; one of the five, according to Dorsey’s arrangement, of the Dhegiha group. Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated therefrom, the main body divided at the month of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca crossing Missouri River and proceeding northward, while the Kansa ascended the Missouri on the south side to the mouth of Kansas River. Here a brief halt was made, after which they ascended the Missouri on the south side until they reached the present north boundary of Kansas, where they were attacked by the Cheyenne and compelled to retrace their steps. They settled again at the month of Kansas River, where the Big Knives, as they called the whites, came with gifts and induced them to go farther west. The native narrators of this tradition give an account of about 20 villages occupied successively along Kansas River before the settlement at Council Grove, Kansas, whence they were finally removed to their reservation in Indian Territory. Marquette’s autograph map, drawn probably as early as 1674, places the Kansa a considerable distance directly west of the Osage and some distance south of the Omaha, indicating that they were then out Kansas River. The earliest recorded notice of the Kansa was by Juan de Oflate, who went from San Gabriel, N. Mexico, in 1601, till he met the “Escansaques,” who lived 100 leagues to the N. E., near the “Panana,” or Pawnee. It is known that...

Biography of Frank J. Murray

Frank J. Murray. Among the important business houses of Scottsville, Kansas, is the Fitzgerald Lumber Company, the efficient manager of which is Frank J. Murray, a member of one of the old pioneer families of the state, one that still owned the homestead secured many years ago. Frank J. Murray was born in Cloud County, Kansas, not far from Jamestown. His parents were Patrick and Mary Murray, of Irish extraction. They came to Kansas in 1869 and were among the first settlers to locate near Parkerville. In 1872 they took up a homestead and through industry and perseverance Patrick Murray developed an excellent farm. As with other Kansas pioneers, hardships and discouragements were many for a time, but Mr. Murray was an industrious, thrifty man, one who attended strictly to business and he prospered under conditions that a less determined one might have found impossible. Mr. Murray died at his home in 1911, leaving many behind to mourn, a large family and numerous friends who remembered that he was ever willing to help a neighbor over a rough place in life if he could do so. He was a faithful member of the Roman Catholic Church. His widow still lives on the old homestead. They had twelve children born to them, ten after coming to Kansas, and nine are yet living. Frank J. Murray was reared on the home farm. He completed the common school course and later was graduated from the Jamestown High School. Although young for the responsible position he holds, Mr. Murray is capable and gives entire satisfaction. The Fitzgerald Lumber Company was organized as such...

Oliver, Arrena Brown Runft Karp Mrs. – Obituary

Arrena Runft Karp Oliver, 95, of Boise and former Baker City resident, died April 18, 2003 at her home. At Arrena’s request, no services will be held, but there will be a gathering to celebrate her life at the Hillcrest Country Club, 4610 Hillcrest Drive in Boise at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 2. Arrangements are by Summers Funeral Homes, Boise Chapel. Born on Oct. 9, 1907, she was the eldest of four children of John and Elisabeth “Bessie” McIlvain Brown of Council Grove, Kan. She grew up on the family farm homesteaded by her great-grandparents James and Mary McIlvain in the Big John area on the Neosho River in Morris County, Kan. She grew up in the bosom of an extended family of many generations of related homesteaders and particularly enjoyed the frequent gatherings and Christmas festivities, which often were centered at the home of her grandfather John McIlvain. Always a good student, she took the state teacher’s exam upon graduation from high school in 1925, qualified, attended summer school in Emporia State Teacher’s College, and started teaching grade school in a country school when she was 17 years old. She taught at various grade schools in Kansas and continued her education at Ottawa University and the University of Kansas. She remained a teacher throughout her life, whether teaching in school or requiring proper grammar of her children and grandchildren. Her teaching career included a fourth-grade class of 44 students at Tiedemann Elementary School in Baker City in 1946-1947. In 1926 she met Donald Runft of Herrington, Kan., and, despite the effects of the Great Depression, they were...

Biographical Sketch of A. A. Barrick

He was one of the representative business men of Battle Creek, Ida County, Ia., since 1881. In 1878, he married Hannah Gillmore of Jackson County, Iowa. They had two children: Roy and Archie. He is a native of Chicago, Illinois, born June 5, 1852, son of William and Elizabeth Barrick, natives of England. When A. A. was a year old, his father moved to Clinton County, Ia., and on a farm he grew to manhood. He served an apprenticeship to the blacksmith’s trade and was engaged in business on the Maquoketa road one year. He engaged in blacksmithing in Morris County, Ks., for 3 years. In 1881, he came to Battle Creek to do blacksmithing and in 1889 he opened up a stock of farming implements. He had Caultmen threshers and Goodhue and Globe windmills. He had been a member of the City Council 6...
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