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Will of Nancy Austin

WILL-Nancy Austin: In the name of God, Amen. I, Nancy Austin of sound mind and disposing memory, but weak in body, do make and publish this as my last will and Testament. In the first place I give to my Grandsons, Fielding Jones and Isaac Vanmeter Jones, a negro girl of the name of Margaritte, and negro boy by the name of Solomon to be equally divided between them when the arrive at the age of 21 years or without lawful issue, then and in that case my will and desire is that the survivor have the aforesaid negroes with their increase and should both die without lawful issue, then and that case my will and desire is that the aforesaid negroes and their increase go to my three children and their lawful heirs. Secondly, I give to my daughter, Harriet Lapham, a negro girl of the name of Mahala, and a boy of the name of Washington, and girl of the name Julian. Thirdly, I give to my son, Daniel Vanmeter, a negro boy of the name of Alexander, and a negro woman of the name of Teresa, and the horses he claims being 3 in number, and 3 steers, and the hogs he claims, and one bed and furniture. Fourthly: I give to my daughter, Helen Jones, a negro girl of the name of Sarah, and a boy of the name of John, and a girl of the name of Amanda, and two of the choice of my cows, and one bed a furniture. Fifthly: My will and desire is that the house and lot I now...

Slave Narrative of George Morrison

Interviewer: Iris Cook Person Interviewed: George Morrison Location: New Albany, Indiana Place of Residence: 25 East 5t., New Albany, Indiana Place of Birth: Union County, Kentucky Iris Cook District 4 Floyd County STORY OF GEORGE MORRISON 25 East 5th St., New Albany, Ind. Observation of the writer (This old negro, known as “Uncle George” by the neighbors, is very particular about propriety. He allows no woman in his house unless accompanied by a man. He says “It jest a’nt the proper thing to do”, but he came to a neighbors for a little talk.) “I was bawn in Union County, Kentucky, near Morganfield. My master was Mr. Ray, he made me call him Mr. Ray, wouldent let me call him Master. He said I was his little free negro.” When asked if there were many slaves on Mr. Ray’s farm, he said, “Yes’m, they was seven cabin of us. I was the oldes’ child in our family. Mr. Ray said “He didn’t want me in the tobacco”, so I stayed at the house and waited on the women folk and went after the cows when I was big enough. I carried my stick over my shoulder for I wus afraid of snakes.” “Mr. Ray was always very good to me, he liked to play with me, cause I was so full of tricks an’ so mischuvus. He give me a pair of boots with brass toes. I shined them up ever day, til you could see your face in ’em.” “There wuz two ladies at the house, the Missus and her daughter, who was old enough to keep company...

Biography of Hon. Peter G. Stewart

HON. PETER G. STEWART. – Peter Grant Stewart was born on the 6th of September, 1809, in Stanford, Delaware County, New York. When eight years of age he moved to Jefferson, Scohane County, where he received a common-school education, and learned the trade of a watchmaker. He followed the occupation of watchmaker and jeweler in Middlebury until the spring of 1838, when, with a selected stock of watches, jewelry, etc., he started for the West, going by way of Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Toledo and Fort Wayne to Mount Vernon, Indiana, and from there to Morganfield, Union County, Kentucky, where he located, working at his trade until fall. From Morganfield he traveled down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, stopping at the principal points for the purpose of trade, arriving in due time at New Orleans. From there his route took him to Mobile, Mariawa, Jackson County, Florida, Columbus, Georgia, Clarksville and Pendleton, South Carolina. There he was taken sick, and returned to New York. Having recovered his health, in January, 1840, he went to Kentucky, and in the spring to Springfield, Missouri. On the 1st of September, 1842, he was married to Miss Rebecca R. Cason. During the year 1842 he was appointed brigade paymaster by General Smith. Having made the necessary preparations during the winter, on or about the 17th of April, 1843, he left Springfield, Missouri, in company with others and bidding adieu to friends and home started to cross the trackless desert on his way to his future home in Oregon. At Spanish encampment, near Independence, a committee of three, J.W. Nesmith, Peter G. Stewart and another...

1850 Slave Bill of Sale

UNION CO. (Ruby J. Girten) A Bill of Sale: This indenture, made and entered into this 5th day of June 1850, by and between Joseph W. Cromwell and Martha Cromwell, his wife, of the first part, and Wm. C. Hamner of the second part, all of the County of Union and State of Kentucky, Witnesseth: That the said Joseph W. Cromwell and Martha his wife, for, and in consideration of the sum of $550.00, in hand paid, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, have given, granted, bargained and sold and by these present to grant bargain, sell and deliver unto the said Wm. C. Hamner a certain negro woman called Milly, about 29 years old, and her child, called James, about 18 months old which negroes together with their increase, and the said Joseph W. Cromwell and Martha Cromwell for themselves, their heirs and assigns, will, warrant, and defend unto the said Wm. C. Hamner, his heirs and assigns forever, against the claims of themselves, their heirs, and against the claims of all and every person or persons whatever. Said Cromwell and wife further warrant said negro woman, Milly, to be sound and healthy, and slaves for life. In testimony whereof, the said Joseph W. Cromwell and Martha Cromwell, his wife, have hereunto set the hands and affixed their seals, the day and date first written. Joseph W. Cromwell Martha L. Cromwell (Recorded in Deed Book on Page 155 at Morganfield,...

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