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Biographical Sketch of John H. Taylor

John H. Taylor was born in Oglethorpe County, Georgia, February 26, 1801, and, is the only living member of a family of seven children of Woody B. and Nancy (Seay) Taylor, who were born and married in the “Palmetto State,” and moved to Georgia, and in 1809 to Tennessee. At that time the country was covered with canebrake, and Lynchburg contained only two log cabins. Woody B. Taylor died in 1840, and the mother in 1846. John H. resided with his parents until July 18, 1826, when he wedded Elizabeth Ford, who was born in South Carolina and has since lived in the vicinity of Lynchburg. To this venerable couple ten children were born, seven of whom are living. Politically Mr. Taylor is a stanch democrat, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church. W. B. Taylor is the second of John H. Taylor’s children. He was born near his present residence March 15, 1829, and resided with his parents on the farm until his marriage, March 2, 1869, to Susan T. Keller, a daughter of Dr. J. A. Keller, a native of the county. He moved to Illinois in 1842, and there enlisted in the Mexican War as first lieutenant, and died from the effects of the service in 1847. The family then came to Lynchburg, where the mother, whose maiden name was Lauriette Walker, now lives. Mrs. Taylor was born September 23, 1840, and is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Taylor served in the late war in Company E, Turney’s First Tennessee, and October 1, 1864, lost an arm at Petersburg, Virginia. He...

Biographical Sketch of Alexander Forester

Alexander Forester, farmer, was born in Moore County (then Lincoln County)in 1820, and is one of eleven surviving members of a family of fourteen children born to Isaac and Matilda (Hodges) Forester. The father was born in South Carolina in 1790, and came to Moore County previous to the war of 1812, in which he participated under General Coffee, and afterward under General Jackson. At the close of the Indian war he returned to Moore (Lincoln) County, and soon after was married. The parents are both still living, having now enjoyed the companionship of each other about seventy years. The youngest child is now forty three years old, and the oldest is our subject. The parents have had eighty nine grandchildren, sixty nine of whom are still living. They have over sixty great-grandchildren, all still living but three or four. They also have two great-great-grandchildren, both living. Our subject at the age of twenty three left his home, and in 1843 was united in marriage to Minerva Eaton, a native of Moore (Lincoln) County. Eight children blessed this union, seven of whom are still living, and live are married and have children. In 1862 Mr. Forester enlisted in the Confederate Army, in a Kentucky regiment of infantry, but afterward, just before the battle of Murfreesboro, was transferred to Newman’s battalion. In 1863 he was discharged, owing to advanced age, after having participated in the battles of Shiloh and Baton Rouge. March 20, 1863, he returned home, and has since followed farming on the place where he now resides, a good farm of 270 acres. The whole Forester family is...

Biographical Sketch of James C. Tipps

James C. Tipps, a popular citizen of Moore County, and one of six surviving members of a family of twelve children born to Michael and Leah (Seivalley) Tipps, was born August 6, 1839, on the farm he now owns, near Marble Hill, Moore County. The father of James C. was a native of North Carolina, born 1809, and came to Moore County (Franklin) when four years of age. He was a tiller of the soil and magistrate for several years. He died in 1883. The mother, a native of Moore (Lincoln) County, was born January 24, 1810, and is still living. At the age of nineteen our subject left home, and September 2, 1858, was married to Mary Stoball, native of Coffee County, Tennessee. Eleven children were the results of this union, all of whom are living. At the time of his marriage he began farming for himself and continued this occupation till the commencement of the late war, when he enlisted in the Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, with which he remained till the close of the war. He then returned home, and in partnership with John Seivalley was engaged in merchandising from 1875 to 1880. He was constable for four years, beginning 1866, and deputy sheriff for two years. He was appointed postmaster of his village in 1875, and still holds that position. Mr. Tipps has in his possession a deed written by Gen. Jackson, conveying land to our subject’s grandfather. Mr. Tipps and family are members of the Lutheran...

Biographical Sketch of Hon. R.A. Parks

Hon. R. A. Parks, editor of the Lynchburg Falcon and attorney at law, was born October 21, 1849, in Lynchburg. His father is Rufus B. Parks, whose sketch appears next above. His early life was spent with his parents and in school. He engaged in teaching school and studying law when a young man. In June 1872, he obtained license to practice law, and has ever since continued to do so, in the firm of Holman & Parks, from 1872 to 1884, and since then in the firm of Holman, Holman & Parks. He was united in marriage, November 14, 1872, to Miss Susan A. Holt, of Moore County. This union has been blessed in the birth of six children, four of whom are now living: Roy H., Pearl, Harry R. and Margaret. Mr. Parks is a democrat in politics and takes an active interest in political affairs. He has held the office of recorder of Lynchburg, and is now filling his second term of office as mayor of the town. He represented Lincoln and Moore Counties in the lower house of the Legislature from 1882 to 1884. He is a member of I. O. O. F., having joined that fraternity in December 1884. Since February 1884, he has been editor and proprietor of the Lynchburg Falcon, and has made it a good...

Biographical Sketch of S.E.H. Dance, M.D.

S. E. H. Dance, M. D., the leading physician of Lynchburg, Tennessee, was born March 30, 1834, son of Stephen M. and Sarah (Smith) Dance, born in Virginia and North Carolina, and died in 1853 and 1862, respectively, they came to Lincoln County about 1826. The father was a farmer of ordinary means and a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject spent his boyhood days on a farm and at the time of his father’s death was attending Emory and Henry College, Virginia. He returned home and began the study of medicine and attended one course of lectures, in 1854-55 in the University of Tennessee. He graduated from the Louisville (Kentucky) Medical College in 1856 and began practicing his profession in Lynchburg. During the war he was assistant surgeon of Turney’s First Tennessee, and in 1862 was promoted to surgeon of the Eighth Tennessee, continuing until near the close of the conflict, when he was made medical director for the reserves of Tennessee. After his return from the battle field he resumed his profession in Lynchburg, in which he has met with good success. September 16, 1856, he married Miami A. Berry, and eight children blessed their union; Edward M., William H., Charles H., Frank P., Fannie, Robert R., Harry H. and Clifford C. In 1883 Dr. Dance and his son, William H., opened a drugstore in Lynchburg. He is one of the stockholders of the cotton mills, and also owns an interest in the grist mills of Dance & Waggoner, at...

Biographical Sketch of Thomas H. Parks

Thomas H. Parks, of the firm of Parks, Taylor & Co., of Lynchburg, Tennessee, is a son of Ambrose Lee and Eleanor E. (Watts) Parks. The father was born in North Carolina. After his marriage he moved to Missouri, where he resided until 1846, and then came to Lynchburg, Tennessee, where he was engaged the wheelwright and wagon making business. Both parents died in 1850. Thomas H. was born in Missouri October 19, 1840, being but nine years old when his parents died. He made his home with an uncle in Alexander County, North Carolina, until seventeen years old. In 1858 he came to Lynchburg, Tennessee, and engaged in the carpenter’s trade, relying upon his own exertions for support. He joined the Confederate Army, Turney’s First Tennessee, Company E, and served until the close of the war, with the exception of nearly two years spent in prison. He began dealing in livestock after the war, and about 1870 began selling goods in Lynchburg, but on a very limited scale. He has increased his business from time to time, and is now doing well financially and is one of the leading business men of Lynchburg. He was married in 1869 to E. A. M. Taylor, daughter of Squire J.H. Taylor, and their union has been blessed with six children: Minnie M., John L., Willie K., Emma P., Thomas H. and Nellie H. Mr. Parks are democrats, and own about 200 acres of land. He and wife and eldest daughter are members of the Christian...

Forrest’s Escort

Killed in the service F. G. Motley, S. J. Green and W. T. K. Green Wounded W. F. Taylor, received seven wounds Served to the end of the war without being wounded Lieutenant John Eaton Privates J. N. Taylor, T. J. Eaton, D. R. Bedford, D. H. Call, E. Clark, T. M. Dance, M. A. L. Enochs, C. W. Lucas, and Orderly Sergeant M. L. Parks This command served under General Forrest during the war, and surrendered May 10, 1865, at Gainesville,...

Biographical Sketch of Jack Daniel

Jack Daniel, proprietor of the distillery at Lynchburg, Tennessee, was born in Moore County, in 1848. His father, Gallaway Daniel, came from North Carolina to Moore County when eight years of age and in later years followed tilling the soil as an occupation. Our subject has always been a farmer, and in 1876 erected his distillery, which he began operating two years later, under the firm name of Daniel & Call, continuing thus five years. It has a capacity of fifty bushels per day and turns out some of the finest brands of “Lincoln County” whisky. Mr. Daniel is the owner of a large and productive farm, which he manages in connection with his distillery, and on which he raises large numbers of...

Biographical Sketch of Parks, Rufus B.

Rufus B. Parks, clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Moore County, Tennessee, is one of four children born to Allen W. and Fannie (Miller) Parks, natives of North Carolina, born in 1797 and 1802, respectively. They took up their abode permanently in Tennessee in 1826. The father was a farmer, merchant, and in latter days kept hotel, and was magistrate a number of years. He died November 18, 1884, and the mother January 6, 1877. Rufus B. was born May 5, 1827, near Lynchburg, and received a good practical education. For about four or five years after attaining the age of nineteen he clerked in merchandise stores and then engaged in the business for himself, continuing until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company E, Fifth Kentucky Infantry, and was afterward transferred to the Ninth Kentucky Infantry, in which he was lieutenant. On account of poor health he resigned and came home, but soon joined the Twenty-third Tennessee Battalion and served until the close of the conflict. After his return he farmed alone until 1883, when he engaged in merchandising also, which he followed until 1885. He owns 120 acres of land. In 1849 he was married to Emily J. Roundtree, who died November 30, 1884, having borne him four children: Rufus A., Alice A. (Mrs. Loderick Robertson), Edwin L. and May. Mr. Parks has been a member of the Christian Church, in which he is deacon, for forty years. Politically he is a democrat, and has been magistrate about six years. He was elected to his present position in 1883, and is...
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