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Biography of Mrs. Mary E. Burbank

MRS. MARY E. BURBANK. – The wife of Honorable A.R. Burbank was born near Milford, Delaware, January 14, 1827, and is the daughter of Jesse E. and Ellen Eckles. While but a child of sixteen months, she was bereft of her mother by death, and was intrusted to the care of her sable nurse until three years old. At this date she moved with her father and his family of three daughters and two sons to the far West, crossing the Alleghany Mountains in wagons, and settling at Clarkesburgh, Ohio, in the fall of 1830, residing there five years. As the Eden of their expectations had not been reached, this place was left for amore distant seat in Illinois; and a settlement was made upon a farm near Naples. Here she was afflicted by the death of her father, which occurred June 17, 1837; and she was left to the care of her sisters. At the age of seventeen she was united in marriage to Augustus R. Burbank, the ceremony being celebrated May 1, 1845, at the town of Jacksonville, by the Reverend Chancey Hoberts, at the house of Hicholas and Ann Milburn, – parents of Reverend W.M. Milburn, “the blind man eloquent,” and so often chaplain in Congress. She resided six years of her married life in Naples, and spent two years at Bloomington, Illinois. With her husband she came via the Isthmus of Nicaragua to Oregon, arriving in Portland May 30,1853. The first home was made at Lafayette, but in 1857 a removal was made to Portland. Mrs. Burbank is still remembered as the first church organist...

Biography of Hon. A. R. Burbank

HON. A.R. BURBANK. – Mr. Burbank, a founder of society and business upon the Pacific coast, was born April 15, 1817, near Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the son of Major Daniel Burbank, an American officer in the war of 1812, who came with his family in an open boat down the Alleghany and Ohio rivers as early as 1814, and made a home on its northern shore near the present metropolis. The Major was from Williamstown, Massachusetts. His wife, Margeret Pinchen, was from Atica, New York. In 1818 a further move was made in the family boat down the Ohio to Shanetown, Illinois, thence to McLanesburgh, and in 1825 to Exeter, Morgan county, in the same state. Here, at the age of nine, A.R. Burbank, the subject of this sketch, who was the youngest of a family of six sons and five daughters, met with the loss of his mother by death, and six years later was called upon to bid his father the last farewell, and follow his body to its resting place in the grave. Having received very careful religions and moral training from his parents, and having acquired habits of thrift and industry, he began while still a boy to make a career and carve out for himself a fortune. As a clerk in a store he acquired an insight into and a grasp upon business affairs. At the age of twenty-six he rose to the position of partner in the firm of Hollandbush & Burbank, which did a heavy business in the town of Naples, Illinois. At the age of twenty-eight, on May 1, 1845,...

Biography of Miss Eva L. Burbank

MISS EVA L. BURBANK. – Miss Burbank, the only child of Honorable A.R. and Mary E. Burbank, whose memory is still cherished with regretful interest by the people of our state, was born in Monticello, Washington Territory, January 22, 1861, where her parents were at that time keeping the Monticello House. At the age of five and a half months she was christened (as an offering) in the Taylor Street Methodist Church, of Portland, by the Reverend T.H. Pearn. At the age of five years she began attendance upon school, and developed unusual quickness and ability of mind. In August, 1867, her home was transferred to Lafayette by the removal thither of her parents; and she received at this place still further educational advantages. In her tenth year she visited the Eastern states in company with her mother, and upon her return the following year entered the St. Helen’s Hall of Portland, Oregon, for the still further improvement of her natural ability, where she remained some three years. She was furnished all advantages for a thorough musical education; and her talent proved to be of such high character as to merit the encomium of her last musical instructor, Professor Hugh Gunn of California, that hers was the finest in Oregon. Her bright and hopeful career was, however, cut short by the accident in August, 1880, which threw a gloom over the whole state. On the second day of that month she left her home for Portland, Oregon, to join an excursion party from East Portland to spend a few weeks’ recreation at Long Beach. She became the life of...

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