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Slave Narrative of James Southall

Person Interviewed: James Southall Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Clarksville, Tennessee Age: 82 I was born in Clarksville, Tenn. My father was Wesley and my mother was Hagar Southall. Our owner was Dr. John Southall, an old man. Father always belonged to him but he bought my mother when she was a young girl and raised her. She never knew anything ’bout her people but my father’s mother lived with us in de quarter’s at Master Southall’s. Master John never sold any of his slaves. We was known as “Free niggers.” Master said he didn’t believe it was right to own human beings just because dey was black, and he freed all his slaves long before de war. He give ‘en all freedom papers and told dem dat dey was as free as he was and could go anywhere dey wanted. Dey didn’t have no where to go so we all stayed on wid him. It was nice though to know we could go where we pleased ‘thout having to get a pass and could come back when we pleased even if we didn’t take advantage of it. He told his slaves dat dey could stay on at his farm but dey would have to work and make a living for deyselves and families. Old Master managed de farm and bought all de food and clothes for us all. Everybody had to work, but dey had a good time. We had good clothes, plenty of food and good cabins. We had what was known as Georgia bedsteads. Dey was wooden bedsteads wid holes bored in de side...

Montgomery County, Tennessee Cemetery Transcriptions

Tennessee Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Tennessee county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Montgomery County, Tennessee Tombstone Transcription Project) John Allen Cemetery Baggett Cemetery Batson Cemetery Benevolent Lodge (Port Royal), Cemetery Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery Black Cemetery Blanton Cemetery Blooming Grove Baptist Church Cemetery Bridgers Cemetery Broome Cemetery Cage Cemetery Casey Cemetery Channell Cemetery Chapel Hill Methodist Church Cemetery Clark Cemetery Cuthbertson Cemetery Dotsonville Church Of Christ Cemetery Dotsonville Baptist Church Cemetery Ferrell Cemetery #1 aka Hodges Cemetery First Baptist Church Of Woodlawn Cemetery Gaines-Sullivan Cemetery Gordon Cemetery Grace Chapel Episcopal Church Cemetery Hampton Cemetery Harrison Cemetery Harvey Cemetery Hawkins Cemetery Haynes Cemetery Head Cemetery Hunter Cemetery I.O.O.F. Cemetery Keesee Cemetery Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery Little Hope Church Cemetery Marable Cemetery John McCauley Cemetery Mc Gee Cemetery Mt. Carmel Cemetery Mt. Herman Cemetery Church Cemetery Neblett Cemetery No Name Cemetery Olivet Free Will Baptist Church Cemetery Pardue Cemetery Pinnacle Point Cemetery Roberts Cemetery Robinson Cemetery Rye Cemetery Salem Methodist Church Cemetery Saint Paul Cemetery Sango Cemetery Shady Grove Cemetery Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery Smith Cemetery Smith Cemetery Smith Cemetery Southside Tennessee Cemetery Stack-Baggett Cemetery Swift Cemetery Trotter Cemetery Unnamed Cemetery Weems Cemetery Wylies Chapel Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Folkfinders ) Baggett’s Chapel Cemetery Bridgers Cemetery Canaan Cemetery Corban Cemetery Dabney-Manson Cemetery Dunbar Cemetery Ellis Cemetery Groves Cemetery Hopewell Cemetery Jackson Cemetery Macedonia Cemetery Martha Chapel Cemetery Martin Chapel Cemetery...

Biography of Daniel M. Sechler

Daniel M. Sechler, founder of the D. M. Sechler Carriage Company, of Moline, Illinois, was born March 4, 1818, at Danville, Pennsylvania, and died at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 27, 1903. Mr. Sechler’s forefathers, in the days of the persecution of John Huss, were obliged to flee for refuge from Austria, taking up their abode in Holland, from which country, in 1685, Mr. Sechler’s great great grandfather emigrated to America, locating near William Penn’s town of Philadelphia. His grandson, John Sechler, a revolutionary soldier, founded the town of Danville, the birthplace not only of the subject of this sketch, but also of his father, Rudolph Sechler, and his mother, Susannah (nee Douty). His wife’s parents were Thomas and Catharine (nee Angstadt) Mackey. Mr. and Mrs. Sechler had but one son, Thomas M:, whose biographical sketch follows this one. Daniel M. Sechler’s early education was acquired in the public schools, of his native town, supplemented by several terms in the local academy. At seventeen years of age he began his apprenticeship at the carriage maker’s trade, in the City of Port Deposit, Maryland. Four years later he entered into a copartnership with a Mr. Ball, under the firm name of Ball & Sechler, Carriage Manufacturers, at Milton, Pennsylvania. During this period Mr. Ball died. Mr. Sechler continued the business for three years thereafter, producing from fifty to seventy-five carriages per year, and then disposing of his establishment, removed to Wooster, Ohio, where he lived in retirement for a time. Later he operated a foundry in Adams County, Ohio, and in 1852 he took the management of the pattern...

Biography of Thomas M. Sechler

Moline is a city of manufacturers, one of the most prominent of whom is the subject of this sketch, Thomas M. Sechler. He was born October 25, 1841, in Milton, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, at which place his father, D. M. Sechler, at that time conducted a carriage factory. His father, Daniel Montgomery Sechler, was born at Danville, Pennsylvania, March 4, 1818, and his mother, Pamela (Mackey) Sechler, was born in Rutland Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1819. She is still living at her home in Cincinnati, Ohio. T. M. Sechler’s paternal great-great-great grandfather came from Holland in 1685, together with a brother, and settled in William Penn’s territory near Philadelphia. The brother settled in North Carolina, and one hundred and seventy-eight years later the descendants of these two brothers were to be found in the ranks of the opposing armies in the war of the Rebellion. The great-grandfather, John Sechler, born March 20, 1739, died December 21, 1831, was a soldier in the American army during the Revolution, from 1776 to 1778. He was born in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, and after the close of the Revolutionary war he moved to Columbia County in the same State, where he founded the town of Danville, now the county seat of Montour County. Mr. Sechler’s maternal grandmother, Susannah (Douty) Sechler, was born April 27, 1781, and died September 8, 1871. She was descended on her mother’s side from John Cooper, one of the early settlers in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, where he came in 1628. Her father, John Douty, was also a Revolutionary soldier, and was taken prisoner by the British at...

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