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Biography of Gerald Francis Wilson

Gerald Francis Wilson. Among the contributing factors to progress and prosperity in Clay County are the newspapers, and in taking them into account the Leader, at Longford, should by no means be overlooked. It is a live, wide-awake, progressive journal becanse such are the characteristics of its able editor and manager, Gerald Francis Wilson, who had the advantage of being a practical printer and before assuming charge of the Leader had had editorial experience. Gerald Francis Wilson was born at Racine, Wisconsin, November 4, 1891. His parents were Fred Morgan and Miranda (Kennedy) Wilson, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania in 1870 and died at Detroit, Michigan, in March, 1909. The Wilson ancestry is Scotch-Irish and the family to which Editor Wilson belongs had been in the United States since colonial times. His father, Fred Morgan Wilson, was born in Michigan in 1860 and had practically spent his life thus far in his native state and had always been identified with railroad affairs. He is a republican in political affiliation, fraternally is a Knight of Pythias, and belongs to the Episcopal Church. His family numbers three sons: Chester, who is a miner in Montana, and Gerald Francis and Leonard. Gerald F. Wilson attended the public schools of Omaha, Nebraska, until he completed his second year in the high school and then passed two years in Creighton University at Omaha. After leaving the university in 1908 Mr. Wilson entered a printing office and learned the trade, subsequently worked as a journeyman printer in Nebraska, Illinois, Michigan, Colorado, Utah, California, Washington, North and South Dakota and Iowa, during this...

Biography of Flavius Ralls Smith, M. D.

Flavius Ralls Smith, M. D. Identified with one of the most important and exacting, as well as one of the most useful of professions, Doctor Smith had become widely known for his remarkable skill as a surgeon; and easily holds a place in the front rank of the surgeons of Kansas. Doctor Smith is one of the proprietors of the Winfield Hospital, an institution of more than local scope, since its patients come from several states and its reputation is largely due to the personal ability of Doctor Smith. He had spent most of his life in Kansas, and his experience as a physician and surgeon covers more than a quarter of a century. He was born near Peru, Madison County, Iowa, November 22, 1862, son of William and Ellen (Hollingshead) Smith. His father was born in Kentucky, and when about ten years of age his parents removed to Tennessee and two years later to Jacksonville, Illinois, and then to Sangamon County, Illinois, where William Smith married. William Smith was loyally and sincerely devoted to his nation in the struggle of the Civil war and served in Sherman’s army during many of its most noted campaigns, including the march to the sea. From Illinois he removed to Iowa, and in 1874 brought his family to Kansas, locating on a farm two miles west of Old Atlanta, in Rice County. A year later he bought a farm in Mitchell Township, two miles north and four miles west of Lyons. That farm was the scene of his activities until 1892, when he moved into the Village of Lyons and in 1897...

Biography of John Henry Seal

John Henry Seal, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Mitchell, is a native of Kansas, represents some of the pioneer families who came here in territorial times and his own career had been one of progressive industry as a teacher, business man and banker. Mr. Seal was born at Meriden, Shawnee County, Kansas, December 24, 1879, a son of John C. and Elizabeth (Rippetoe) Seal. The Seal family was established in America by his great-grandfather, who came probably from Germany and settled in the State of Pennsylvania. The grandfather, Henry Seal, was born in Pennsylvania in 1827, grew up and married there and spent his active life as a farmer. As a Kansas pioneer he arrived in 1857 and opened up one of the new homesteads at the Town of Meriden. He lived there until his death in 1897. Henry Seal married Miss Cunningham, a native of Missouri, who also died at Meriden. Altogether they had nine children, two sons and two daughters being now deceased. The five still living are: Daniel, a retired farmer at Arkansas City, Kansas; Siler, a farmer at Macksville, Kansas; Albert, a farmer near Beaver City in Beaver County, Oklahoma; Zed, also a farmer in Western Oklahoma; and David, a blacksmith living in the State of Washington. In the maternal line Mr. Seal is a grandson of John Rippetoe, who was born in Kentucky in 1831. He identified himself with Kansas even earlier than the Seal family, arriving in the territory in 1855 and homesteading 160 acres five miles northwest of Meriden. In the early days he did considerable trading with the Indians,...

Biography of Charles C. Shumway

Charles C. Shumway, who had been a resident of Rice County for over thirty years, was formerly a farmer and rancher and for the past five years had been a leading factor in the Little River State Bank, of which he is president. Mr. Shumway is of old colonial stock. His ancestry in the paternal line goes back to Peter Shumway, who was born in 1635 and came to America from France between 1660 and 1675. He was of Huguenot stock. He was on the roll of colonial soldiers of Massachusetts as early as 1675. He was called out for service in a number of Indian uprisings and was in the war against the Narragansett tribes and helped capture their stronghold in Rhode Island. He was often called “Peter the Soldier.” His military service took him in the ranks of the earliest of American minute men. Some interesting items are found in connection with his estate. This estate which he left was valued at 83 pounds, 16 shillings, 6 pence, and one of the papers bears the following notation: “Apprised by us this 10th of June, 1695.” His wife, Frances Shumway, and her sons managed this property successfully until about 1714, when by reason of increasing bodily infirmity she was admonished of providing for its distribution, and on April 3, 1714, she made her last will and testament. The estate of Peter Shumway consisted of swine, lambs, oxen, cattle, horses and all things pertaining to what a successful farmer of those days would require. Other items were his “gun, knapsack, powder and bullets, valued at one pound.” From the...

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