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Choctaw Traditions – The Council Fire, The Nahullo

The faces of the Choctaw and Chickasaw men of sixty years ago were as smooth as a woman’s, in fact they had no beard. Sometimes there might be seen a few tine hairs (if hairs they might be called) here and there upon the face, but they were few and far between, and extracted with a pair of small tweezers whenever discovered. Oft have I seen a Choctaw warrior standing before a mirror seeking with untiring perseverance and unwearied eyes, as he turned his face at different angles to the glass, if by chance a hair could be found lurking there, which, if discovered, was instantly removed as an unwelcome intruder. Even today, a full blood Choctaw or Chickasaw with a heavy beard is never seen. I have seen a few, here and there, with a little patch of beard upon their chins, but it was thin and short, and with good reasons to suspect that white blood flowed in their veins. It is a truth but little known among the whites, that the┬áNorth American Indians of untarnished blood have no hair upon any part of the body except the head. My knowledge of this peculiarity was confined, however, to the Choctaws and Chickasaws alone. But in conversation with an aged Choctaw friend upon this subject, and inquiring” if this peculiarity extended to all Indians, he replied; “To all, I believe. I have been among the Comanche’s, Kiowa’s and other western Indians, and have often seen them bathing, men and women, promiscuously together, in the rivers of their country, and found it was the same with them, their heads...

Biography of Simon P. Kramer

Simon P. Kramer. During the greater part of the years since 1880, Simon P. Kramer had been a resident of Kansas and had been identified with the milling industry. He is one of the oldest flour millers in the state and had operated in many different towns. In 1915 he removed to Topeka, where he bought and reorganized the Topeka Flour Mills Company, of which he is now president. He had now one of the finest mills in equipment and service in this section of the state. It is equipped throughout with Allis-Chalmers machinery and only recently he gave an order for an oil burning engine to replace the old engine. Mr. Kramer is a thoroughly progressive and alert business man, and under his administration he intends to make the Topeka mills one of the finest plants of the kind in the Middle West. His business interests have taken him to many states, and he had been more or less on the move ever since early manhood. But contrary to the old proverb he had accumnlated a generous share of material prosperity while going from place to place, He was born in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, February 15, 1858, one of the twelve children of Jacob and Mary (Miller) Kramer. His father was also a miller by trade, and spent his lifetime in that occupation. He conducted a water power mill on his own farm back in Ohio, and died there in December, 1883. With an early education asquired in the common schools of Wayne County, Ohio, Simon P. Kramer at the same time acquired more or less of...

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