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West Virginia Naturalization Records

Naturalization to become a U.S. citizen was a two-part process: the Declaration of Intent to Naturalize, or First Papers, and the Naturalization Record (including the Naturalization Petition), or Final Papers. The First Papers were normally filed five years before the Final Papers because of the five-year residency requirement to become a citizen. No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). These naturalization records can be found on two different websites, one paid and one free. There is no difference between the indices at either location, it really depends on what software you may be using to record your family tree, as you will want to use Ancestry’s database if you’re using either their online tree or FTM and have a membership. Ancestry – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – $$$ Family Search – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – Free Barbour County WV Naturalization Law Orders, 1903-1904 Berkeley County WV Declarations of Intention, 1908-1922, v. 1 Declarations of Intention, 1922-1929, v. 2 Declarations of Intention, 1930-1978, v. 3 Naturalization Certificates, 1911-1916 Naturalization Certificates, 1917-1924 Naturalization Certificates, 1924-1929 Naturalization Lists, 1840-1991, v. 1 Naturalization Loose Papers, 1840-1905 Naturalization Petitions, 1930-1946 Naturalization Petitions, 1946-1958 Naturalization Records, 1904-1906, v. 1 Naturalization Records, 1930-1953 Naturalization Records, 1953-1991 Petition Records, 1908-1920, v. 1 Petition Records, 1921-1929, v. 2 Brooke County WV Applications for Oath of Allegiance, 1937 Declarations of Intention,...

Biography of Hon. William M. Duffy

Hon. William M. Duffy, attorney at law in Checotah and now serving his first term as justice of the peace, was born in Callaway County, Missouri, on the 21st of August, 1866, a son of Mathew and Caroline (Ellis) Duffy. The father was born in Ireland and came to America when a young man, locating in Missouri, where he engaged in farming. He followed agricultural pursuits the remainder of his life and died in 1874, one of the prominent and representative citizens of the community in which he resided. Mrs. Duffy was born in Missouri and her death occurred in 1872. In the acquirement of an education William M. Duffy attended the common schools of Callaway County, Missouri, and later enrolled in Westminster College at Fulton, where he remained for two years. He then taught school for four years in Kansas and served as County clerk of Harper County, that state, in 1891, being reelected in 1893. During that time he studied law and in 1896 was admitted to the bar. In the same year he located in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, for the practice of his chosen profession and he resided there until 1906, in which year he came to Checotah. In the intervening years he has built up a large and lucrative practice, handling much important litigation before the courts and he has taken an active part in public life. From 1911 to 1914 he was deputy County clerk of McIntosh County and he was a member of the state legislature in 1915 and again in 1919. He has served on the town council and is now...

Biographical Sketch of James M. Beale

James M. Beale, farmer and stock-dealer; P. O. Arcola; was born in Mason Co., W. Va., Jan. 1, 1825. He married Miss Jane R. Wylie in the fall of 1852; she was born in Brooke Co., W. Va.; they had six children – three living, viz., Ida M., J. Edwin and Florence; he lived in West Virginia until 1826, when, with his parents, he went to Kentucky, where he lived until 1833, when he went to Virginia, where he lived until 1857, when he came to Illinois and settled on his farm in Humbolt Tp., in Coles Co., where he lived until 1870, when he moved to the village of Humbolt and lived there until 1876, when he moved to Arcola; and, though his residence is in Arcola, he spends the most of his time on his farm in Humbolt. He is no office-seeker, and has taken no part in township affairs, except connected with the schools. He owns 280 acres in Humbolt Tp., which he has earned by his own labor and management; his parents, Richard and Hannah Willson Beale, were natives of Virginia; she died in Kentucky, and he died in Natchez,...

Biography of Edward C. Fisher M. D.

Edward C. Fisher, M. D. While Rice County was organized more than thirty-five years ago and even before that was the home of a considerable number of people, none of the real pioneer physicians are still living there or in practice. The honor of being the oldest active physician and surgeon in continuous practice belongs to Doctor Edward C. Fisher, who located at Lyons thirty-three years ago. Doctor Fisher is a man of notable attainments in his profession, and brought to Rice County the ability and value of service which would have made him as successful in the larger centers of population as he had been in this country community. Doctor Fisher was born at Newcastle, England, April 25, 1844, but had lived in the United States since early childhood. His father, John Fisher, also born at Newcastle in 1822, grew up and married in that city and was superintendent of the mine at that great coal center. In 1847, when Doctor Fisher was three years of age, the father brought his family to the United States and became identified with the ownership and operation of coal works in Southern Ohio. He finally retired from business and lived in Boston, Massachusetts, until his death in 1908, at the venerable age of eighty-six. After coming to America he identified himself in a strenuous manner with the republican party, and regularly gave it support from the time of its organization until the party elected its last presidential candidate. He was equally zealous in church affairs as a Methodist, and fraternally was identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. John Fisher...

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