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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew Jackson, who witnessed a similar one that of Tecumseh in council assembled with the Muskogee’s, shortly afterwards of which I will speak in the history of that once powerful and war-like race of people. Colonel John Pitchlynn was adopted in early manhood by the Choctaws, and marrying among them, he at once became as one of their people; and was named by them “Chahtah It-ti-ka-na,” The Choctaws Friend; and long and well he proved himself worthy the title Conferred upon, and the trust confided in him. He had five sons by his Choctaw wife, Peter, Silas, Thomas, Jack and James, all of who prove to be men of talent, and exerted a moral influence among their people, except Jack, who was ruined by the white man s whiskey and his demoralizing examples and influences. I was personally acquainted with Peter. Silas and Jack, the former held, during a long and useful life, the highest positions in the political history of his Nation, well deserving the title given him by the...

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the end of the second week since leaving home, our feelings were warm and our hearts beat high for those that are dear and behind us. Tuesday, Oct. 20.–Left Adairs at 6 o’clock a. m. The country extremely hilly and not...

Biography of Abraham Snethen

Abraham Snethen and his wife, Elizabeth Stewart, were natives of Germany. They emigrated to America and settled in New Jersey, where they had eleven children, of whom the names of only seven are now remembered. They were William, John, Reuben, Polly, Lydia, Elizabeth, and Margaret. William married and settled in Kentucky in 1792, and in 1810 he removed to Ohio, where he lost his wife. He then started to return to New Jersey, but died of cholera, at Hagerstown, Md. John was born in March, 1789, and when he was eight years old his mother died. He was then bound out to a man in Elizabethtown, N. J., to learn the trade of wheel-wright. He remained with the man seven years, and then having had a misunderstanding with his landlady, he ran away and went to Philadelphia, where he embarked on board a ship as a sailor He followed the sea seven years, and during the latter part of that period, while the ship was returning from the West India Islands, with a cargo of sugar and coffee, the yellow fever broke out among the crew and all of them died except Snethen, the cook, and one sailor. They succeeded, however, in bringing the vessel safely into port, and delivering her to the owners, whose admiration of Snethen’s bravery and skill was so great that they proposed to educate him and give him command of a ship. He accepted their offer, but in the meantime paid a visit to his friends in New Jersey, who persuaded him to abandon the sea. He then went to Kentucky, and arrived at...

Slave Narrative of Joe Robinson

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Joe Robinson Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Mason County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1854 Place of Residence: 1132 Cornell Avenue Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE JOE ROBINSON-EX-SLAVE 1132 Cornell Avenue Joe Robinson was born in Mason County, Kentucky in 1854. His master, Gus Hargill, was very kind to him and all his slaves. He owned a large farm and raised every kind of vegetation. He always gave his slaves plenty to eat. They never had to steal food. He said his slaves had worked hard to permit him to have plenty, therefore they should have their share. Joe, his mother, a brother, and a sister were all on the same plantation. They were never sold, lived with the same master until they were set free. Joe’s father was owned by Rube Black, who was very cruel to his slaves, beat them severely for the least offense. One day he tried to beat Joe’s father, who was a large strong man; he resisted his master and tried to kill him. After that he never tried to whip him again. However, at the first opportunity, Rube sold him. The Robinson family learned the father had been sold to someone down in Louisiana. They never heard from, or of him, again. Interviewer’s Comment Mr. Robinson lives with his wife; he receives a pension, which he said was barely enough for them to live on, and hoped it would be increased. He attends one of the W.P.A. classes, trying to learn to read and write. They have...

Biography of J. B. Thomas

J. B. THOMAS. There is no enterprise of equal importance in Howell County, Missouri, than that of insurance. Among those engaged in this business is our subject, J. B. Thomas, one of the representative men of Willow Springs and abstracter and notary public of that city. Mr. Thomas came from southern Iowa and has made his home in Willow Springs for the past five years. He is a native Kentuckian, born in Mason County August 27, 1859, and his father, James C. Thomas, is farming in that county at the present time. The latter is also a native of that State, and a son of one of the early pioneers. J. B. Thomas passed his school days in Kentucky and Ohio, where he attended college at Yellow Springs. In 1886 he went to Iowa and embarked in merchandising, which he continued until he came to this city. After locating in Willow Springs he followed merchandising about a year, and in 1890 engaged in the insurance business. The same year he was elected notary public. Subsequently he was elected to the office of alderman of Willow Springs and police judge, and he is also coal oil inspector of the city, appointed by Gov. Francis. Mr. Thomas is engaged in loaning money and is agent for the Missouri Guarantee Savings and Building Association. He is one of the directors in the Citizens’ Bank at Willow Springs, and an energetic, enterprising and public-spirited citizen. Mr. Thomas has shown his appreciation of secret organizations by becoming an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias. Of the former he is a charter member of...

Slave Narrative of Arnold Gragston

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Arnold Gragston Location: Eatonville, Florida Age: 97 (Verbatim interview with Arnold Gragston, 97-year old ex-slave whose early life was spent helping slaves to freedom across the Ohio River, while he, himself, remained in bondage. As he put it, he guessed he could be called a ‘conductor’ on the underground railway, only we didn’t call it that then. I don’t know as we called it anything – we just knew there was a lot of slaves always a-wantin’ to get free, and I had to help ’em.”) “Most of the slaves didn’t know when they was born, but I did. You see, I was born on a Christmas mornin’ – it was in 1840; I was a full grown man when I finally got my freedom.” “Before I got it, though, I helped a lot of others get theirs. Lawd only knows how many; might have been as much as two-three hundred. It was ‘way more than a hundred, I know. “But that all came after I was a young man – ‘grown’ enough to know a pretty girl when I saw one, and to go chasing after her, too. I was born on a plantation that b’long to Mr. Jack Tabb in Mason County, just across the river in Kentucky.” “Mr. Tabb was a pretty good man. He used to beat us, sure; but not nearly so much as others did, some of his own kin people, even. But he was kinda funny sometimes; he used to have a special slave who didn’t have nothin’ to do but teach the rest of us –...

Biographical Sketch of Richard Perry Tolle

Tolle, Richard Perry; merchant; born, Maysville, Ky., Oct. 20, 1883; son of William A. and Sarah Frances Fowler Tolle; educated, public schools, Maysville; married, Indianapolis, Ind., May 19, 1904, Annabel Day; issue, three children; manager the S. S. Kresge Co., Cleveland store; 32nd degree Mason, A. A. 0. N. M. Shrine; member Country Club. Recreations: Baseball and...

Biography of E. T. Currens

E. T. Currens, farmer and fruit-grower; P. O. Mattoon; was born in Bracken Co., Ky., in 1816; his father was a farmer and tanner, and for fifty-five years conducted the two interests jointly, at Germantown, Ky.; E. T.’s early life was spent upon his father’s farm and in learning the tanning business; he entered Augusta College, Ky., in 1832, and graduated there from in 1836; he then engaged in mercantile life and farming till 1854, when he moved to Iowa and established the Kentucky settlement in Marshall Co.; in 1861, he returned to Maysville, Ky., and engaged in the hardware trade, in the firm of Currens & Owens; in 1864, he came to Mattoon, where he has since resided. Mr. Currens has thrice plighted himself at the nuptial altar; his first marriage occurred in 1839, his second in 1849, and his last in 1859, each time choosing for his helpmeet one of Kentucky’s fair daughters. His life has been one of marked activity; he has been an enterprising and liberal business man, and has always taken an active and leading part in introducing and rearing fine stock, in agricultural and horticultural exhibitions; he was the first merchant to build a tobacco warehouse outside of the river towns, and to buy, price and ship the farmers’ crops of Mason and Bracken Cos.; he founded the Union Agricultural Company of these counties, and gave his woodlands for their first exhibitions, in 1854-55; he was a member of the Board of Directors and Treasurer of the Company so long as he remained a citizen of the State; he was also a member...

Mason County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Mason County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Census Substitute from Tax List Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Mason County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Transcription Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Mason County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Mason County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at RootsWeb Census Transcription Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Mason County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Mason County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Mason County, Kentucky Census Images $ 1850 Mason County, Kentucky Slave Schedule $ Hosted at Mason County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Households #52-58 Hosted at Mason County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Abstracted...

Mason County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Mason County Mason County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Mason County USGenWeb Archives Project Chiles Cemetery Stonelick Cemetery Coburn Cemetery Downing Cemetery Mason County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Mason County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Beasley Church Cemetery Cemetery Junction Cemetery Craig/Worthington Cemetery Enders Cemetery Farrow Family Cemetery Fleming Family Cemetery Gault-Wells Cemetery Goddard Cemetery Haughey Cemetery Hughes Cemetery Kerr Cemetery Lewisburg Church Cemetery McCarthey-Masterson Cemetery Mitchell Cemetery Mt. Gilead Cemetery Norris Family Cemetery Osborne-Lewis Cemetery Owens Family Cemetery Pepper/Thompson Cemetery Plumville Church Cemetery Rust Cemetery Slack Cemetery Stubblefield Cemetery Sub. Downing Cemetery Wilson Cemetery...
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