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Biography of Walter L. McVey

Walter L. McVey is one of the able young members of the Independence bar, and had enjoyed extensive relations with the profession in Montgomery County for the past eight years. Though a native of Illinois, his life had been spent largely in this part of Southern Kansas. He was born at Marshall, Illinois, September 11, 1880. His father, William H. McVey, was born in the same state in 1833, and died in Independence, Kansas, in 1891. He was reared and married in Illinois and in 1883 moved to Montgomery County, Kansas. He devoted his life to the service of the Methodist Episcopal Church as a minister, and on being superannuated retired to his farm in Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1883. He was a republican. The maiden name of his wife was Samantha J. Flemming, who was born in Shelbyville, Illinois, in 1840 and now resided at Independence, Kansas. Their children were: Emma, deceased wife of J. L. Kuhl, who is a merchant at Beardstown, Illinois; Mary F., a teacher of music and living at home with her mother; June, now deceased, whose husband, R. L. Webb, as a farmer in Jasper County, Missouri; George W., a railway mail clerk, who died at Independence, Kansas; Stella, wife of A. C. Sewell, employed by the Baden Mercantile Company at Independence; and Walter L. A cousin of the Independence attorney is Dr. R. Ed MeVey of Topeka. Reared on a farm in Montgomery County and attending the country schools there, Walter L. McVey was graduated from the county high school in 1902, following which he took two years of collegiate work in...

Biographical Sketch of V. R. Bridges, M. D.

V. R. Bridges, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mattoon; was born in Rockingham Co., Va., June 4, 1832; his father settled in Ross Co., Ohio, near Chillicothe, in 1836; in 1841, he came to Illinois and settled in Newton, Jasper Co.; he was engaged in contracting on public works, both in Ohio and Illinois. Dr. Bridges acquired a good academic education, mainly through his own exertions, and at the age of 14, began life for himself. At the age of 17, he taught his first school; in 1851, he was employed in the drug store of Dr. H. H. Hayes, at Lawrenceville, Ill., and began the study of medicine under him. He next came to Marshall, and completed his studies under Drs. Payne and Duncan. In the spring of 1854, he located in Salisbury, Coles Co., and began the practice of his profession. In 1860, he came to Mattoon, his present residence. He entered the U. S. service as Assistant Surgeon of the 62d Regiment, I. V. I; in 1863, he was promoted to be Surgeon of the 126th Regiment, and was mustered out in 1865, after the close of the war; soon after his discharge from the service, he was appointed Examining Surgeon for the Pension Bureau-a position he still holds. In 1876, he attended Rush Medical College, from which he graduated Feb. 27, 1877. He was married Jan. 8, 1856, to Mary E. Boyd, a native of Indiana; four children have been the fruits of the union-Flora J. and Charles M., living, Edward L. and Emma, deceased. Has been a member of the City Council a number...

Biography of James M. Drake

James M. Drake is one of Riverside’s representative and well-known businessmen, and has for years been the treasurer of the city, which responsible and important office he fills with honor and credit to himself and the municipality whose interests he so ably guards. Although not a pioneer of Riverside, her history would be incomplete without a fitting mention of Mr. Drake’s eight or ten years’ association with her interests. He is a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and dates his birth April 12, 1837. His parents were Charles and Mahala J. (Jeter) Drake. His father was a native of Virginia, a descendant of one of the old colonial families. Mr. Drake was reared in Louisville until the age of twelve years. At that time the death of his mother occurred and his father then moved to Marshall, Clark County, Illinois. After a residence of four years in that place the family moved to Nashville, Tennessee. Mr. Drake terminated his school days in the public schools of that city and then returned to Louisville and started in life by learning the trade of au upholsterer and house-furnisher. He then established himself in Shelbyville, Kentucky, where he remained until early in 1858, when he established au upholstering and house-furnishing business in Huntsville, Alabama. He was successfully conducting his enterprise when the secession movement and the formation of the Confederate government plunged his State into the civil war. Mr. Drake was not a secessionist, nor did he believe that success would ever crown the efforts of the Southern leaders in disrupting the Union of the States, but he was a Southern man by...

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