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Biographical Sketch of Frank M. Harris

Frank M. Harris was born in Marshall county, West Virginia, January 7, 1843, and is a son, of John and Drusilla Harris, both natives of Virginia. Our subject received a common school education in his native State, and learned the carpenter’s trade with his father, but has given his attention, almost entirely to farming. He came to this county in 1877. Mr. Harris was united in marriage, November 30, 1865, to Miss Eliza A. Wilson, who was born May 29, 1844. By this union they have had four children: John A., born October 30, 1866-is dead; Hanson, born May 5, 1869; Lionel, born February 7, 1871; Lydia A., born July 23, 1873- is...

Captain James Harrod’s Company Of Kentucky Pioneers

A List Of Captain James Harrod’s Company Of Kentucky Pioneers In The Flncastle County Battalion In the spring of 1774, Captain James Harrod, a Pennsylvanian by birth, collected at the mouth of Grave Creek, now Moundsvllle, Marshall County, West Virginia, a party of thirty-one young men, for the purpose of making a settlement in Kentucky. Descending the Ohio to the mouth of the Kentucky river, they thence Journeyed through the wilderness to the Big Spring, now in Mercer county. Here they were engaged in founding Harrodsburg, the oldest town in Kentucky, when they were discovered by Daniel Boone and Michael Stoner who had been sent by Lord Dunmore to warn John Floyd, Deputy Surveyor of Flncastle county, Virginia, which then included all of Kentucky, together with his assistants, then at the Falls of the Ohio, that an Indian War was begun. Harrod and party abandoned their settlement, and proceeded to the Holston Valley, where he and twenty-seven of his men Joined the Fincastle Battalion, and with Christian, arrived at Point Pleasant the evening after the battle. Officers James Harrod Captain Privates James Blair James Brown Abraham Chapline James Harlan James Harrod Thomas Harrod John Clark Evan Hinton John Crawford Isaac Kite Jared Cowan James Knox John Cowan James McCulloch John Crow Alexander Petrey Azariah Davis Azarlah Reece William Fields Jacob Sandusky Robert Gilbert Jonn Shelp David Glenn James Sodousky Thomas Glenn Benjamin Tutt James Hamilton James Wiley Silas Harlan David Williams John Wilson – Total...

Biography of Dallas Sprague

Dallas Sprague has for many years been a resident of Champaign County, and his fine farm and home are located in Compromise Township, in section 8. He is one of’ the best known citizens of northeastern Champaign County and his own record and that of the family deserves a prominent position in this publication. Mr. Sprague is a native of West Virginia, born at Moundsville, on the Ohio River, in Marshall County, twelve miles below the city of Wheeling. His parents, John J. and Jane (Hull) Sprague, were also natives of the same state. When Dallas Sprague was about twenty-seven years of age, having acquired his education in his native state, he came to Illinois to seek better opportunities and began farming in Grundy County. Soon afterward he met and married Suzan Severson. Mrs. Sprague has the industrious capability characteristic of her ancestry. She was born at Bergen, Norway, a daughter of Seward and Suzan Severson. She was reared and educated in her native country and at the age of twenty-six came with a number of young friends to America to find and utilize the splendid opportunities of this country. From New York she traveled by railroad to Chicago and from there to Morris, Illinois. Being an industrious young woman, she readily found employment and while thus engaged made the acquaintance of Mr. Dallas Sprague. This acquaintance ripened into an affection which brought about their marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Sprague continued to live in Grundy County for three years and then removed to Champaign County, which has been their home now for many years. They first rented a farm...

Grave Creek Mound Tablet

The Grave Creek Mound tablet has been an object of debate since it’s purported discovery in 1838 – it is considered one of America’s great hoaxes. Henry Schoolcraft in his Archives Of Aboriginal Knowledge discusses the history of the mounds and the tablet up to 1860.

Grave Creek Mound

Grave Creek mound РA noted prehistoric Indian mound, situated near Moundsville, Marshall County, West Virginia, at the point where Grave Creek unites with Ohio River. It was visited as early as 1734, as appears from this date cut on a tree growing from its summit, but was first described by Hart in 17971 , since which time it has been repeatedly described and figured, attention of scholars having been called to it chiefly by an inscription on a small stone which was reputed to have been found in the mound during its excavation. The mound is conical inform, being probably the largest example of this type in the United States, having a diameter at the base of about 320 ft, a height of 70 ft, and 1,870,000 cu. ft of solid contents. It is symmetrical in form and has a dish-shaped depression in the top. It was excavated in 1838 by the proprietor, who first carried a horizontal drift at the base to the center and a shaft from the top to connect with the drift. Two burial vaults were discovered, one at the base and an other 30 ft above, each constructed of logs and covered with stones, which had sunk as the wood decayed, leaving the depression in the summit. Squier and Davis2 assert that under the center of the mound there was a slight natural elevation into which the lower vault had been sunk. This vault contained two human skeletons, the upper vault but one. Accompanying the skeletons were 3,000 to 4,000 shell beads, ornaments of mica, several copper bracelets, and various articles of stone, including...

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