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Grimes, Loraine Wyman – Obituary

Loraine W. Grimes, 87, Grants Pass, died today, Friday, Dec. 1, 1995, at Royale Gardens Health Care Facility. Services are pending with Hull & Hull Funeral Directors. [Loraine’s parents were George Milton Grimes and Maude May Fleming. He was married to Josephine Pirzer who died November 27, 1957 in Marion Co. He was buried in Pleasant Valley Cemetery] The Courier, December 1, 1995 Contributed by Shelli...

Campbell, Inez Shelton – Obituary

Services for Mrs. Inez Campbell, 85, 1599 Market St. NE, who died Monday [March 17, 1969] at a Salem hospital, will be 2:30 p.m. Friday in Howell-Edwards Mortuary. Rev. W. Harold Lyman and Rev. Robert Hayes Mulkey officiating. Interment will be in Belcrest Memorial Park Cemetery. Statesman, March 19, 1969 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Heman J. Gerr

The name of Geer is so well known in our state that the following account of the father of T.T. Geer of the Waldo hills will be of interest to all. This now venerable pioneer was born in Ohio in 1828, removing with his parents to Illinois in 1840. In 1847 he crossed the plains to Oregon with General Palmer’s train. The large company forestalled trouble with the Indians. Peter Hall, who stopped with Whitman at Walla Walla was the only one who experienced any disaster. The crossing of the Cascade Mountains by the Barlow Road proved the worst of their trials. After reaching Oregon, Heman stopped at Oregon City, and engaged in the boot and shoe business; while the father located at Butteville, Marion County. In 1848 he young man abandoned “city” life and located a claim in the Waldo hills, marrying Miss Cynthia Eoff. In 1849 he was prevented from completing the journey to California, by men returning with the report that the mines were “worked out.” From 1854 to 1861 he was in the nursery business at Silverton, and the next year in business at Salem, going thence to the Caribou mines in 1862, thence to Auburn, Oregon, and from this point with his goods to Bannack City. In 1864 he mined on the John Day river. Having separated from his first wife he made Union county his home, serving as deputy sheriff under his brother Isaiah Geer, of the newly organized Union county. In 1867 he located a fruit farm at the Cove, and formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Annie E. Duncan. He...

Biography of James N. McClure

JAMES N. McCLURE. – In the person of the gentleman of whom who now write, we have one of those men, who have passed almost their entire life in this county, and hence are familiar with its resources and advantages in every department. James N. McClure was born on January 2, 1858, in Eugene, Marion county, Oregon, whence six years later he came with his parents, Charles M. and Laura V. (Pierce) McClure, to this county and here he has received his education and grown to his present prominent position in the county, having manifested, in the long years in which he has moved in the business and social circles of this realm, an uprightness, born of sound principles, and integrity and worth coupled with sagacity, that have given him a very enviable prestige throughout the county and stamped him as one of its most substantial and worthy citizens. When he came to this county he made his home with his parents until 1887 and then launched out into the world in independent action. In 1886, he purchased his present home of one hundred and sixty acres, which is situated eight miles south from Lagrande. The farm is well improved and every where hears testimony to thrift and industry. He has one of the finest orchards in the county and is skillful in the production of the fruits of the soil, and in raising stock. On January 2, 1887, the marriage of Mr. McClure and Miss Helen D., daughter of Mary A. Earl, was solemnized. They have been blessed with the advent of the following children. Harley E., Lucy,...

Biography of Cornelius G. Morehead

A native of the Web foot State, the son of about the earliest pioneers of this state, raised amid its environments, both eastern and western Oregon, the subject of this article is thoroughly an Oregonian and a typical representative of its energetic and progressive citizens. Cornelius G. was born in Linn County, Oregon, on June 26, 1865, being the son of Robert M. and Martha (Curl) Morehead. The parents came with ox teams to Oregon in 1848 and settled in the Willamette valley and the father being a millwright, built the first mill of the state. It was located at Salem and was built in 1849. In 1869, the family removed to Jackson County; Oregon, and in 1872, they came to Prairie City, Grant County, this state. There the father erected the Strawberry flour mills and in 1879 sold out and Went to Weiser, Idaho. He built a mill there and in 1887 he returned to the Willamette valley, where he died in 1890. Mrs. Morehead is still living in Douglas County, this state. Our subject was educated in the schools of the various places where lie lived and in 1884 he started for himself. He raised stock in Idaho until 1888, then sold out and came to Malheur County and engaged with the Oregon Horse and Land Company, where he wrought for a number of years. During this time he made several trips to different markets with stock. In 1901 he purchased his present place, a farm of eighty acres, one and one-fourth miles west from Nyssa. His farm is well improved and produces abundance of alfalfa hay...

Biographical Sketch of Isadore L. Poujade

This prominent citizen and leading stockman of Harney county is one of the men who deserves to be accorded space in the history of the county because of his worth, because of his uprightness, integrity and probity, and because of the excellent work that he has accomplished in the upbuilding and progress of the county. Mr. Poujade was born in Marion county, Oregon, on December 8, 1857, being the son of Andrew and Matilda (Clinger) Poujade. At the age of fifteen he went to Jackson county with his parents, with whom he resided until 1880. He gained his education in these places and also a wealth of excellent training in the practical walks of life and in raising stock and in farming. In 1880 he came to Harney valley and engaged as foreman for Todhunter & Devine. Six years were spent in this responsible position, and then he engaged in partnership with Charles W. Jones, in the stock business. They purchased what is known as the Cow creek ranch. This estate consists of eight hundred acres of fine meadow land, six miles east from Harney, and is improved with a fine dwelling of twelve rooms, good shop, barns, corralls, fences and all implements for handling a first-class stock and hay ranch. After the death of Mr. Jones Mr. Poujade purchased all the stock, but owns the ranch in partnership with Mrs. Jones, the widow of his late partner. Mr. Poujade is one of the prosperous stockmen of the county, and has demonstrated his ability to so conduct the affairs of business that a crowning success is his to enjoy....

Biographical Sketch of Mary A. Miller

Mary A. Miller, familiarly know by all as “Grandma Miller”, is one of the loveable elderly ladies of our county and it is especially gratifying to have the opportunity to append an epitome of her career in this the abiding chronicles of Harney county. She is a woman of many virtues and graces and has done a noble part in the life of the pioneer and she has many friends who admire her real worth of character, her faithful life, and her own rare qualities of intrinsic worth. She is now making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Jane Poujade, who is the wife of one of the leading stockmen of Harney county and whose comfortable and commodious residence is six miles east from Harney, on what is known as Cow creek ranch. Mrs. Miller was born in Richland county, Ohio, on September 29, 1827, and at the age of eleven went with her parents to Henry county, Iowa. There she married Mr. Isaac H. Jones, on October 26, 1845. They removed to Boone county, Iowa, where Mr. Jones died on June 27, 1860. In 1862 Mr. Jones married William Miller and in 1863, with five children, they started across the plains with ox teams for the Pacific coast. The arduous and trying journey was completed when they landed in Salem. There Mr. Miller engaged in raising stock for three years and then removed to the Rogue river valley, where he continued in raising stock and farming until the time of his death, which sad event occurred on June 6, 1886. Since that time, Mrs. Miller sold the property...

Biography of Hon. Peter G. Stewart

HON. PETER G. STEWART. – Peter Grant Stewart was born on the 6th of September, 1809, in Stanford, Delaware County, New York. When eight years of age he moved to Jefferson, Scohane County, where he received a common-school education, and learned the trade of a watchmaker. He followed the occupation of watchmaker and jeweler in Middlebury until the spring of 1838, when, with a selected stock of watches, jewelry, etc., he started for the West, going by way of Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Toledo and Fort Wayne to Mount Vernon, Indiana, and from there to Morganfield, Union County, Kentucky, where he located, working at his trade until fall. From Morganfield he traveled down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, stopping at the principal points for the purpose of trade, arriving in due time at New Orleans. From there his route took him to Mobile, Mariawa, Jackson County, Florida, Columbus, Georgia, Clarksville and Pendleton, South Carolina. There he was taken sick, and returned to New York. Having recovered his health, in January, 1840, he went to Kentucky, and in the spring to Springfield, Missouri. On the 1st of September, 1842, he was married to Miss Rebecca R. Cason. During the year 1842 he was appointed brigade paymaster by General Smith. Having made the necessary preparations during the winter, on or about the 17th of April, 1843, he left Springfield, Missouri, in company with others and bidding adieu to friends and home started to cross the trackless desert on his way to his future home in Oregon. At Spanish encampment, near Independence, a committee of three, J.W. Nesmith, Peter G. Stewart and another...

Biography of Gen. John H. Stevens

GEN. JOHN H. STEVENS. – This hero of a hundred Western adventures, and a pioneer of the great Inland Empire, was born on a town line in Windham County, Vermont. The son of Asa Stevens, a miller and farmer, he learned to use his hands and brain in practical affairs, and at the village school obtained a good working education. In his youth he followed business in Boston, and was engaged in lumbering in Pennsylvania. In 1832 he came west to Michigan, and at Coldwater, Branch County, kept a hotel, advancing his business also by taking mail contracts, and in such early ventures as the conditions of life in the Wolverine state afforded at that early day. He became a colonel in the state militia, and succeeded also to a generalship. Eight years he served as sheriff of Branch county, and during that time made many notable arrests. In 1852 he prepared for the journey to Oregon, rigging up a large team of mules and horses, and with his daughter Mary C., who subsequently became the wife of the famous lawyer of Eugene, Oregon, Stukeley Ellsworth, and with thirteen young men, among whom was Green Arnold, now of LaGrande, made the journey across the plains. Although in the midst of the pestilential cholera, he lost but one man. He made a speedy trip, covering the distance from the Missouri to the Willamette in four months. In our virgin territory of thirty-seven years ago he undertook business as hotel-keeper in company with Green Arnold, and as successor of W.H. Rees at Champoeg. He dug gold in the early days at...

Biography of John H. Moores

J.H. MOORES. – Among the immigrants who came to the Sate of Oregon in 1852 was Honorable John H. Moores, the subject of this sketch, who deserves more than passing mention for the service rendered by him to the commonwealth during an active business career in the state extending over a period of twenty-eight years. Among the older residents who played a prominent part in the earlier development of the state was his father, the late Colonel I.B. Moores, Sr., whose love of novelty and adventure brought him as one of the first pioneers to Oregon, where he located in Lane county. He was a man of great energy and activity, and had seen considerable military service, having served in the Seminole Indian war in two campaigns with Jackson in Florida. He also commanded a regiment in the Black Hawk war in 1831, and afterwards in 1846 enlisted for the Mexican war. He came to the Sate of Oregon in 1852, locating near Eugene. He represented Lane county in the legislative assembly, and afterwards in 1857 in the state constitutional convention. He was afterwards, a Republican candidate for state senator from the county. He died in 1861, and is buried in the Odd Fellows Rural Cemetery near Salem. John H. Moores was born on the 21st of June, 1821, near Huntsville, in Lawrence county, Alabama, where he remained until 1825, when his father, owing to his intense aversion to the system of slavery, and prompted by the pioneer spirit which characterized his whole life, removed from the State of Alabama to Danville, Illinois, where was spent the boyhood and...
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