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Biographical Sketch of Ebenezer E. Cunningham

Ebenezer E. Cunningham was born April 6, 1839 in Marion County, Missouri. He received his education in the public schools of Iowa. At the age of 18 years he emigrated to the Territory of Nebraska. He enlisted in the Civil War and served as 2nd Duty Sergeant in Co. C, 2nd Nebraska Cavalry and in the 48th Missouri Infantry as 1st Lieutenant of Co. K. In 1868 Mr. Cunningham was elected to the Nebraska State Senate from the first district (Richardson County) and re-elected in 1870, was elected President of the State Senate and presided at the impeachment trial of Governor David Butler, session of 1870 and 1871. In March 1871 Ebenezer was appointed U. S. Surveyor General for Nebraska and Iowa. which position he held until the spring of 1876 when he resigned to take up the work of U. S. Surveys in the field. Judge Cunningham followed mining for 15 years and in 1886 came to San Francisco. In 1892 he removed to South San Francisco, and in April of that year was appointed postmaster, a position he has held continuously to the present time. For fourteen years he was also Justice of the Peace for the First Township of San Mateo County, which latter office he gave up when the post office was raised to the third...

Biography of Charles A. Leavy, M. D.

Dr. Charles A. Leavy, who in the practice of medicine is specializing on diseases of the ear, nose and throat in St. Louis, was born in Palmyra, Missouri, September 25, 1873. His father, the late James Leavy, was a native of St. Louis, where his father, who was of Irish descent, settled at a very early day. James Leavy was a sculptor who won professional prominence and he was also a Civil war veteran who served with the rank of corporal in Company G, Thirtieth Missouri Volunteer Infantry for three and a half years, being wounded in the battle of Vicksburg. He died in Louisiana, Missouri, in 1911, when at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Saunders, was a native of Palmyra, Missouri, and died in 1880 at the age of thirty-eight years. In the family were three children, two of whom were daughters. Dr. Leavy, the second in order of birth, acquired a district school education in Ralls county and then attended the high school at New London, Missouri, and the Chillicothe (Mo.) Normal School, spending three years as a pupil in the latter institution. At length he determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work and was graduated from the Marion Sims Beaumont Medical College of St. Louis in 1903 with the M I. D. degree. He took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in Ralls county for three years prior to beginning the study of medicine and following his graduation from the Medical College he became clinical instructor in the St. Louis University, a...

Biography of Rev. Patrick Joseph Kane

Rev. Patrick Joseph Kane, who for a third of a century has been pastor of the Church of Our Holy Redeemer at Webster Groves, is a native of Ireland but during his childhood days was brought by his parents to the United States and became a pupil in the public schools of Bloomington, Illinois, where the family home was established. He afterward attended a local business college and later became a student in the Christian Brothers College at St. Louis. Having determined to enter the priesthood he subsequently pursued his theological studies in St. Mary’s Seminary at Baltimore, Maryland, and there received his ordination on the 22d of December, 1882. Father Kane began his active work as a priest at Hannibal, Missouri, where he was assigned to the duty of assistant, remaining there until the 1st of May following, when he was transferred to St. John’s church in St. Louis, at which he officiated as assistant pastor while the regular pastor was making a tour in Europe. In the fall of 1883 Rev. Fr. Kane was appointed pastor of the church of the Immaculate Conception at St. Mary’s, Missouri, and his three and one-half years’ ministry there was remarkably successful. Under his guidance the work of the church and its various societies was thoroughly organized and during the period of his labors there thirty-five or more new members were received into the church, the parish numbering about two hundred families. He spent much time in traveling through the country districts, visiting the members living there and stimulating an interest in the church and its work. His labors resulted in...

Biography of Judge John W. McElhinney

For the fourth term Judge John W. McElhinney has been called to the bench of the thirteenth circuit court of Missouri having entered upon the duties of this position in 1901. His course has at all times reflected credit and honor upon tile state that has honored him and he is today numbered among the ablest of Missouri’s jurists, for film decisions have at all times been strictly fair and impartial, and moreover have been the expression of a comprehensive knowledge of tile principles of jurisprudence, combined with ability to apply accurately his principles to tile points in litigation. Judge McElhinney was born February 4, 1851, on the Mason road in Bonhomme township, between Manchester and Creve Coeur, his parents being Alexander and Martha J. (Hibler) McElhinney. It was about the year 1845 that his father removed to St. Louis county, Missouri, from Butler county, Pennsylvania, and here took up the profession of school teaching and also followed carpentering at an early day. Later, however, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and subsequently prepared for the bar, devoting his time and attention to law practice in St. Louis and adjoining counties from 1860 until his demise, which occurred July 3. 1985. For almost two years he had survived his wife, who spent leer entire life in St. Louis county and who passed away in December, 1893. The youthful experiences of Judge McElhinney were those of the farm bred boy. It was four miles from the old homestead to the nearest town and his youthful days were largely passed in attendance at the district school and in tile work...

Biography of W. L. Stowers

W. L. STOWERS. A popular resort for the traveling public and people of this city is the West Plains Hotel, which was first opened in 1883, and is conducted by W. L. Stowers, one of the prominent business men in the city. Mr. Stowers, who is a most genial and obliging host, was born in Marion County, Missouri, August 2, 1843, son of Samuel and America (Whaley) Stowers. Samuel Stowers was born in Virginia in 18O5 to the union of Colman and Nancy (Conway) Stowers, natives of the Old Dominion. The grandfather came to Ralls County, Missouri, as early as 1825 and followed farming, but he was a manufacturer of machinery while residing in Virginia. He was one among the early pioneers of Missouri, and made his home in Ralls County until his death in 1853. He was with the old Whig party and was a prominent man in the county. His wife died in Ralls County about 1851 or 1852, and they were members of the old Ironside Baptist Church. Three daughters and two sons were born to them: Anna, Susan, Nellie, Thomas and Samuel. None of these are living. Samuel Stowers, father of subject, was a young man when he came to this State, this being a year or so before his father came, and he settled in Ralls County and married Miss Whaley. From there they moved to Marion County, and there Mrs. Stowers died in 1847. Two years later Mr. Stowers emigrated overland to California and took his oldest son, Thomas Coleman Stowers, with him. He made the trip in about nine months, and he...

Biography of J. P. Pigg

J. P. PIGG. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch possesses those qualities of industry and energy so necessary to success in any calling, and as a tiller of the soil he is ranked among the most successful in the county. He owes his nativity to Warren County, Tennessee, where he was born November 25, 1844, a son of John and Melvina (Newby) Pigg, the former of whom came to this county about 1851 or 1852, but was a resident of Marshall, Webster County, Missouri, at the time of his death, his wife having passed from life in Tennessee. To their union the following children have been born: Richard, of Christian County, Missouri; Thomas M., of Polk County, Missouri; J. P.; Susan (Mrs. Clark), lives in California, and Melvina (Stonesephen), who lives in this county. Six children are deceased. John Pigg was residing in Taney County, Missouri, when the war opened; he was taken as a prisoner to Springfield, but after being released made his home in Illinois until after the war closed. He then located in Webster County, Missouri, and there died in 1882. J. P. Pigg and his brother Richard were Confederate soldiers under Gen. Price, and afterward under Pemberton. After the surrender of Vicksburg they came to Boone County, Arkansas, and joined Jackman’s army and was with Price on his Missouri raid. He was at Devall’s Bluff, Baker’s Creek and Newtonia, besides numerous sharp skirmishes and minor engagements. While in the infantry he was a private, but became a sergeant after he joined the cavalry. After the war ended he settled in Marion County, and has...

Biography of George W. Pennell

George W. Pennell. It is given to few men to win the prizes of life, and George W. Pennell, of Atchison, belongs to that much favored class. In the building of the great West Mr. Pennell had played a major part. As a young man he had the instinct and the vision uncommon in the average man, which led him away from a comfortable home in a settled community out into the Mississippi Valley, the wonder land of the world. From an inconspicnous youth of vigorous Revolutionary stock, raised on a New York farm, he had become one of the great lumber merchants of the West. Mr. Pennell’s great-grandfather fought as a soldler in the Revolutionary was and his progenitors were substantial New Englanders. His grandfather, John Pennell, was born in Massachusetts in 1774. John Pennell as a young man settled with his family in Ontarlo County, New York, and as one of the pioneers cleared the wildernees in that section, where he lived until his death in Honeoye, that county, in 1859. The father of George W. Pennell was John Pennell, Jr., who was born in Massachusetts in 1798. He married Sally Green, who was born in Vermont in 1817 and died at Honeoye, New York, in 1902, at the ripe old age of eighty-five. Like his father, John Pennell followed the plow. He was a staunch Presbyterian, a whig and later a republican and as such held the office of justice of the peace in his county for many years. He died at his home in Honeoye in 1884. John Pennell and his wife, Sally Green, were...

Biographical Sketch of Minot Judson Savage

Savage, Minot Judson; Clergyman; born, Norridgewock, Me., June, 10, 1841; son of Joseph L. and Ann S. (Stinson) Savage; fitted for college, but did not take course, because of poor health; graduate Bangor Theological Seminary, 1864; (D. D., Harvard, 1896); married Ella A. Dodge, of Harvard, Mass., 1864; Congregational home missionary in California, 1864-1867; pastor, Framingham Mass., 1867-1869, Hannibal, Mo., 1869-1873; became Unitarian; pastor Third Unitarian Church, Chicago, 1873-1874, Church of the Unity, Boston, 1874-1896; minister Church of the Messiah, New York, 1896-1906; retired. Author: Christianity, the Science of Manhood, 1873; The Religion of Evolution, 1876; Light on the Cloud, 1876; Bluffton, a Story of Today, 1878; Life Questions, 18-79; The Morals of Evolution, 1880; Talk About Jesus, 1881; Poems, 1882; Belief in Good, 1881; Beliefs About Man, 1882; Beliefs About the Bible, 1883; The Modern Sphinx, 1883; Man, Woman and Child, 1884; The Religious Life, 1885; Social Problems, 1886; These Degenerate Days, 1887; My Creed, 1887; Religious Reconstruction, 1888; Signs of the Times, 1889; Helps for Daily Living, 1889; Life, 1890; Four Great Questions Concerning God, 1891; The Irrepressible Conflict Between Two World-Theories, 1891; The Evolution of Christianity, 1892: Is this a Good World? 1893; Jesus and Modern Life, 1893; A Ma, 1895; Religion for Today, 1897; Our Unitarian Gospel, 1898; Hymns, 1898; The Minister’s Handbook; Psychics. Facts and Theories; Life’s Dark Problems, 1905; Life Beyond Death, 1901; The Passing and the Permanent in Religion, 1901; Living by the Day, 1901; Men and Women, 1902; Can Telepathy Explain? 1902; Poems, 1905. Editor: Sacred Songs for public Worship (with Howard M. Dow); Unitarian...

Biography of A. O. Harrison

A. O. Harrison, a member of an old and honored family that has figured prominently on the pages of American history, is a leading representative of the Bartlesville bar and is now capably filling the office of city attorney. A native of Missouri, he was born in Callaway County, September 25, 1871, his parents being Jilson Payne and Catherine (Bernard) Harrison, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in Virginia. In the paternal line the ancestry is traced back to General William Henry Harrison, known as “Tippecanoe,” who won fame in the Indian wars of 1812. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this review, Micajah Volney Harrison, represented his district in the Missouri state legislature in the late ’40s and was prominent in public life. He died in 1853 and the state subsequently erected a monument to his memory. His brother, Albert Gallatin Harrison, went from Kentucky to Missouri about 1830 and he also took a leading part in public affairs, being elected congressman from Missouri at a time when that state comprised but two districts. Both Harrisonville and Harrison County were named in his honor and he died in 1836, while serving his second term in congress. The maternal grandfather, Thomas Bernard, traveled in a prairie schooner from Virginia to Missouri in 1836 and in that state he engaged in farming, up to the time of his death. In 1847 M. V. Harrison, the paternal grandfather, took up his residence on adjoining land, subsequently purchasing Mr. Bernard’s farm, which is still in possession of the family. The mother of the subject of this...

Harrison, Hazel – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Hazel Harrison, 93, of Yuma, Ariz., and formerly of La Grande and Island City, died July 6. The funeral will begin at 11 a.m. Friday July 14 at Calvary Lutheran Church in Yuma. Mrs. Harrison was born June 19, 1913, to Henry and Flora Herrmann in Hester, Mo. She was raised in Island City, and graduated from La Grande High School. She married Howard Bousquet, and after his death, Albert Harrison. He also died earlier. She worked at the Umatilla Ordnance Depot in the early 1940s, and at the Yuma Proving Grounds from 1963 until her retirement in 1972. She enjoyed traveling, reading, working crossword puzzles and sending cards to remember special dates for family and friends. Survivors include a son and daughter-in-law, Jim and Connie Bousquet of Mexico, Mo., and a daughter-in-law, Mary Bousquet of Hermiston; six grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and other relatives. A daughter, Glenna Schnase; a son, Bill Bousquet; an infant great-grandson; three sisters, Gertrude Lentz, Erleen Burchfield and Dee Holland; and three brothers, Cecil Herrmann, Earl Herrmann and Harold Herrmann, all died earlier. Memorials may be made to the March of Dimes and Special Olympics. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending July 15, 2006, Published: July 13,...
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