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Biographical Sketch of Charles M. Jones

It is gratifying to be privileged to put in print an epitome of one of the brave men who fought, as did the subject of this sketch for the honor of the stars and stripes and the safety of our free institutions when the foul hand of treason sought to deface all and destroy the homes of freedom. In addition Mr. Jones has always shown himself in the walks of life to be upright and capable and has done a noble part in the advancement and development of the resources of the country. Speaking more particularly of his personal history, we note that his birth occurred in Hickman County, Tennessee on August 13, 1836, being the son of Stephen and Jane Jones. He was reared amid the environments of a farm and gained his education from the schools held in the log cabins of the clay. Our subject remained at home until he had reached manhood’s estate, and in October, 1857, he was married to Miss Emily M. Downey in Searcy County, Arkansas, and soon thereafter went to Marion County, in Arkansas. And there, when the war broke out, he offered his services for freedom’s cause. The date of his actual enlistment was August 6, 1862, at which time he was mustered into Company C, First Arkansas Cavalry, in the volunteer army. He was under Colonel Harrison and was soon detailed as musician in the regimental band. He participated in many skirmishes and did his share of hard service until August 23, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. He is now a member of the A. P. Hovey Post,...

Biography of William C. McEntire

WILLIAM C. MCENTIRE. This substantial citizen owes his nativity to the Old North State, where he was born February 5, 1838, a son of Champion and Sarah (Waters) McEntire, both of whom were born in North Carolina in 1806, and on January 10, 1846, landed in Yellville, Arkansas, in which place they lived for one year prior to moving to Bruno. They purchased a claim near this place, and here made their home until the father’s death, March 2, 1879. He was a Union sympathizer during the war, and at that time was a resident in Greene County, Missouri After the war he returned to Arkansas, and prior to his death became the owner of an excellent farm of 238 acres, and was well and favorably known throughout northern Arkansas. He was a public-spirited citizen, and was a member of the Baptist Church, as was his wife who died May 2, 1888. Their children were as follows: John, who died at Salt Lake City many years ago; James was killed while with Price on his Missouri raid; Lawson was killed in the Mountain Meadow Massacre; William C., the subject of this sketch; Joseph, who died in 1873, was a farmer of this county and was a soldier in the Union Army; Rachel D. is the wife of Dr. Elam; and Arch, who is living in this county. The maternal grandfather, John Waters, was a Revolutionary soldier. William C. McEntire came from North Carolina to Arkansas, with his parents, in a wagon, the journey thither occupying about three months. He received a fair education in the common schools, and at...

Biography of Col. Eli Dodson

COL. ELI DODSON. This gentleman is the intelligent, trustworthy and efficient county and probate judge of Boone County, Arkansas, and in his official capacity has comported himself with dignity, good sound judgment and judicial fairness. He has resided in the county since 1881, but has been a resident of northwest Arkansas since 1852, whither he came from Madison County, Arkansas, in 1834. He was born on his father’s farm in White County, Tennessee, May 22, 1828, the only child of Eli and Mary (Goad) Dodson, the former of whom was born in Virginia in 1798, a son of William Dodson, who helped free this country from British rule by serving in the Revolutionary War. Eli Dodson, the father, died before his son was born and he was also left motherless when two and a half years old. He was reared by his uncle, Alexander Goad, and came with him to this State. His boyhood days were characterized by farm labor, for he unfortunately received no educational advantages until he reached manhood and after his marriage, which event took place in 1847, and was to Miss Rhoda C. Cantrell, daughter of Abner Cantrell, to which marriage twelve children were given: William Y., Mary, Margaret, James A., Elizabeth, Martha D., Rhoda A., Virginia, Eli S., Alice, Melvina R., and Leota B., all of whom are living except the last mentioned. The mother of these children was called from this life April 14, 1870, and Mr. Dodson took for his second wife Mrs. Mary E. Hastings, who lived only a few months after her marriage, dying in February, 1871. Mr. Dodson’s present...

Biography of J. W. Brady

J. W. BRADY. This successful tiller of the soil is a Georgian by birth, and first saw the light of day June 19, 1843, his parents being Hiram J. and Charity (Cook) Brady, a notice of whom is given in the sketch of James P. Brady. J. W. Brady was given the advantages of the common schools of his native State, and on his father’s farm obtained a practical knowledge of agriculture. In April, 1861, he enlisted in the Second Georgia Infantry, in which he held the office of sergeant, and with which he served until the surrender, being with Gen. Longstreet. He was at Wilderness, Richmond, Gettysburg, Spottsylvania and all the engagements in Virginia, and was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg by a gunshot in the right shoulder, and was on the sick list for about two months. He was almost constantly under fire for eleven months, but at all times showed the utmost courage and faithfulness to the Southern cause. At the time he was wounded he was captured by the enemy, but he soon managed to effect his escape and returned to his command at Staunton, Virginia He was in the second battle of Bull Run and in most all the other engagements of Virginia, with the exception of the first Bull Run fight. At the close of the war he returned to his home in Georgia on horseback. He commenced farming there, which occupation he followed up to 1870, when he came to Marion County, Arkansas, and took up a homestead claim on Sugar Orchard Creek, later purchased property and is now the owner...

Biography of W. C. McBee

There are lines of business in which good management is everything, and to this essential merit, coupled with large experience and accurate judgment, is due the success which has attended the mercantile business of W. C. McBee, of McBee’s Landing, Marion County, Arkansas This wide-awake man of affairs is a native of Mississippi County, Missouri, where he was born August 25, 1848, to S. E. and Lucy (Blackburn) McBee, both of whom were born on Kentucky soil, the former being of Irish lineage, and descended from one who fought for the Colonial cause in the Revolutionary War. S. E. McBee removed to Missouri during the early history of that State, but in 1857 became a resident of Marion County, Ark:, and took up his abode at what was known as Talbert’s Ferry, where he made his home for many years, dying in the neighborhood in 1875, after having spent a useful and honorable life as a farmer and stockman. In antebellum days he was a Whig in politics, during the war was a stanch Union man, but after the close of hostilities he gave his support to the Democrat party, and supported its men and measures up to the time of his death. He was a member of Yellville Lodge of the A. F. & A. M., and became well and favorably known throughout Marion County. His wife died in 1873, after having borne him two sons: W. C., and Vardrey, a resident of Baxter County, Arkansas The early life of W. C. McBee was spent in attending the common schools of this county, and being a young man...

Biography of George W. Stone

GEORGE W. STONE. This gentleman who resides in James Creek Township, is the owner of a fine farm, which attests by its value and productiveness the excellent qualities of thoroughness and system which mark the owner. He is a native of Ozark County, Missouri, where he was born in 1848, a son of John and Maria (Bayless) Stone, natives of Tennessee, where they were reared and married. From that State they removed to Greene County, Missouri, and later to Ozark County, of the same State, where Mr. Stone died when the subject of this sketch was very small. In 1862 the family removed to Marion County, Arkansas, where Mrs. Stone breathed her last about 1882, having long been a member in good standing of the Christian Church. Her father was a farmer of Tennessee and died in that State. The paternal grandfather was also a Tennessean and reared four sons: John, Edward, William and David, all of whom died in Missouri. The subject of this sketch was the youngest save one of the following family: Sarah, who died in Marion County, the wife of James Cain; Louisa, who also died here, the wife of Robert Long; Mary Jane, who became the wife of Andrew Benton, and died in Marion County; Adaline, who died in Marion County, the wife of A. C. Musick; Julia Ann, who became the wife of William Lance, also died in this county; Edward Marion, died in this county in 1863; Amanda, became the wife of Joel A. Presley and died in Marion County; George W. and Serepta, who died young. George W. Stone remained with...

Biography of Lewis R. Pumphrey

LEWIS R. PUMPHREY, of the well-known firm of Pumphrey & Cantrell, general merchants and cotton dealers, of Lead Hill, Arkansas, was born in Cannon County, Tennessee, in 1839, to the marriage of Thomas and Margaret (Holt) Pumphrey, also natives of Tennessee. The parents were reared and married in their native State, and about 1839 moved by wagon to Ozark County, Missouri, where they were among the first settlers. There they resided for six or seven years and then moved to Fulton County, Arkansas, where Mr. Pumphrey died soon after. Mrs. Pumphrey then moved to what is now Boone County, Arkansas, where she died about 1859. Mr. Pumphrey was a successful and enterprising farmer and a man of conservative views and habits. He was one of seven or eight sons and daughters born to the marriage of Lewis Pumphrey, who also came to Missouri in 1839, but subsequently settled in Fulton County, Arkansas, where he died when quite aged. He was also a farmer. The maternal grand-father, William Holt, was a native Tennessean, but in 1838 he came to Ozark County, Missouri, subsequently settling in what is now Boone County, Arkansas, where he followed farming and stockraising successfully until his death in 1859. He was a pioneer of the Ozark Region and a man universally respected. His wife died at Lead Hill about 1888. They were the parents of thirteen children, three of whom served in the Confederate Army: R. S., William and James. After the death of her husband the mother of Lewis R. married William Coker, by whom she had six children. Three children were born to her...

Biography of Judge William Keener

JUDGE WILLIAM KEENER. Success in professional life is cautiously bestowed upon people by the goddess, who, in a measure, guides and invariably decorates man’s efforts. And this success is more apt to come because of the pursuer’s genius or adaptability for his calling than from any other cause. This is particularly the case in law, a profession which Judge William Keener’s talents caused him to adopt when starting out for himself. He is now a prominent attorney at Lead Hill, Arkansas, and United States commissioner for the Western District of the State. Judge Keener came originally from the Keystone State; born in Slate Lick Armstrong County, November 30, 1833. The son of John and Sarah (Hetselgeser) Keener, also natives of that State, the father born in 1804 and the mother in 1821. The grandfather, John Keener, was also a Pennsylvanian by birth and passed his entire life as a farmer in that State. He served his country in the War of 1812. His father, Christian Keener, also a native of Pennsylvania, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The Keener family originated in Switzerland, eleven brothers of that name having emigrated to America at an early day and located in Pennsylvania. Our subject’s maternal grandfather, William Hetselgeser, was a Pennsylvania Dutchman and a wealthy and influential farmer and stockman. He reared a family of fourteen children. His wife’s parents, William and Sarah Beatty, were natives of the Emerald Isle, but came with their parents to America and settled with them in Pennsylvania. The six children born to our subject’s parents, two sons and four daughters, were named as follows:...

Biography of Thomas R. Cantrell

THOMAS R. CANTRELL. One of the famous lines of the great play, “The Old Homestead,” is “Young blood tells.” This expression applies not alone to a man’s social advancement, but in business life particularly, where the old men are dropping out and the younger generation stepping into their shoes. In Lead Hill, Arkansas, the younger generation is in the lead in every calling, especially in the mercantile business, a noted firm being Pumphrey & Cantrell, of which Mr. Cantrell is the junior member. Thomas R. Cantrell was born in Warren County, Tennessee, in 1858, son of Paris and Rosanna (Frier) Cantrell, natives of Tennessee and Missouri respectively. They were married in Tennessee, and just after the war removed to McLeansboro, Hamilton County, Illinois, where they resided for a few years and then removed to Greene County, Missouri, thence to Christian County, and about 1878 settled in Harrison, Arkansas Since then they made their homes in Boone and Marion Counties. For many years the father was engaged in the boot and shoe trade, but he is now engaged in agricultural pursuits. He was a Southern man during the war but took no part. Fraternally Mr. Cantrell is an Odd Fellow. He is a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Cantrell was a lady of education and more than ordinary ability. Her death occurred in Boone County, Arkansas Seven children were born to this estimable couple, as follows: Merrill J., a farmer of Boone County; Sabrina A., wife of William J. Patterson, of Greene County, Missouri; Thomas R.; Milton C., of Springfield, Missouri; Addie, wife of George F. McCleary, of Lead...

Biography of J. E. Wickersham

J. E. WICKERSHAM. The evolutions in the industrial world and the improved modes of manufacturing things have been marvelous in the past half century, and scarcely an industry exists that has been left untouched by the spirit of reform. The demand of the age is for labor-saving machinery, improved tools and appliances, and short cuts generally to desired ends. The general hardware store is an excellent means of supplying the demand. An excellent establishment of this kind is owned by J. E. Wickersham, of Yellville, of which city he is a native. His parents, James and Narcissus (Hamblet) Wickersham, have resided in the vicinity of Yellville for over fifty years, the birth of the former occurring in Marion County, Kentucky, November 1, 1824. His parents were Daniel and Susannah (Martin) Wickersham, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of Virginia. The great-grandfather, Samuel Wickersham, was born in the East, but removed to Kentucky at an early day. Daniel and Susannah Wickersham first moved from Kentucky to Indiana, thence to Arkansas in 1848, and engaged in milling and farming in the vicinity of Yellville, accumulating a goodly fortune. When he had reached the age of seventy-five years his house was attacked by robbers, and in order to make him tell where his money was concealed they took him from his home and hung him to a tree, but still he would not tell when let down. He was then left with a guard and the other robbers went to the house to force his wife to tell where the money was concealed, but Mr. Wickersham managed to make...
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