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Biography of Elder John G. Hook

Elder John G. Hook, of Concord, N.H., was born in Chichester, this State, February 13, 1820, the son of Jacob Hook. Elder Hook’s grandfather, Francis Hook, was born in Salisbury, Mass. He was a fisherman by occupation, and he also ran a horseback express from his native town to Newburyport. He finally bought a large tract of land in Chichester, and started all his five sons in life with a comfortable farm. Jacob Hook, father of Elder Hook, was the eldest of the family. He was educated in the Salisbury public schools, and was engaged in farming all his life. At the time of his death he was exactly ninety-two years and six months old. He married Hannah Griffin, of Northwood, N.H. Six children were born to him: Esther B.; Asa J.; Mary A.; Elvira, who died at the age of five; John G., the subject of this sketch; and William P. Elder Hook is the only survivor of this 1839 he started for the Far West. On the way he met some kinsfolk, among them an aunt and several cousins, and stayed with them in the town of Marcellus, N.Y., where he was providentially converted to the Christian religion, largely through the influence of his devoted aunt. Word reached his parents in the East that he had been murdered, and his mother was saved from dying of grief through the timely arrival of a letter from her son. After his return to Concord he attended some religious meetings conducted by Elder Joshua B. Hines, of Boston, who came here with a mammoth tent, the largest then made in...

Alfred Todd of St. Joseph County MI

Alfred Todd7, (Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Dec. 28, 1799, probably in Marcellus, N. Y., died April 17, 1877, married Feb. 19, 1828, Mary Ann, daughter of Oliver and Esther (Sayles) Hovey, who was born Jan. 15, 1809, in Marcellus, N. Y., died May 25, 1888. Mr. Todd lived in Marcellus, N. Y., until 1835, seven years after his marriage, when he moved to Michigan and purchased a farm near the village of Nottawa, St. Joseph County, as a pioneer. Shortly before moving to Michigan, he had bought eighty acres of land in the primeval forest, almost the entire State being then practically a wilderness with many Indians still to be found everywhere, but mostly of a peaceful nature. The State at that time was very sparsely settled, and the nearest railroad station was about sixty miles away, so that the products of the farm had to be drawn with horses that distance to market. Perhaps the most striking of the traits of Mr. Todd was his unusual high conception regarding absolute honesty and justice. His views and practice of honesty were so universally known and regarded that it was a matter of public comment, and his children thought proper accordingly to have inscribed on his tomb, “He was an honest man.” Mrs. Todd was one who combined a rare intellect and accomplishments with much executive ability, being also a poetess and a leader in the intellectual circle of the County. Both Mr. and Mrs. Todd were Presbyterians, and imbibed the rigid discipline of that church and times including the strictest views respecting temperance, which were thoroughly...

James Alfred Todd of North Dakota

James Alfred Todd8, (Alfred7, Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Jan. 1, 1838, in Marcellus, Anondaga County, N. Y., married Sept. 17, 1863, Marien W., daughter of Rev. Gabriel and Sarah Burdick (Grey) Smith, who was born July 12, 1841, in New York City. Mr. Todd, when less than year old was taken by his parents in Sept., 1838, to Nottawa Township, St. Joseph County, Mich., where he attended the county school and then two winters in High School in Sturgis, Mich. He has been a farmer most of his life, and at the present time (1913) has a ranch near Williston, North Dakota. He inherited from his mother, a college bred woman, a fondness for history and literature, and the ability to write and converse with interest. His father was a man of sterling integrity, universally admired for his honesty and justice. Both parents were great Bible students and brought up their family in strict religious observance. He is a Deacon in the Congregational Church in Williston, N. Dak. He has been a Prohibitionist the greater part of his life and neither he nor any of his children drink or smoke. He enlisted in Company A., 11th Michigan Volunteer Infantry, Aug. 24, 1861, and was mustered out of service, Feb. 24, 1863, at Murfreesboro, Tenn. He has always been loyal to the G. A. R. and for over thirty years was secretary of the 11th Michigan Infantry, which held reunions annually in Southern Michigan. He still retains an erect, soldierly carriage though growing slower in step. Mrs. Todd’s father was a M. E. minister and was born...

George Brainard Todd of Marcellus NY

George Brainard Todd8, (Caleb7, Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born April 30, 1834, in Marcellus, Onondaga County, N. Y., died Sept. 20, 1874, in Pensacola, Fla., he was twice married, first, Oct. 7, 1857, Eliza M., daughter of Timothy M. and Elizabeth Ann (Swain) Todd, who was born Oct. 7, 1831, died Nov. 1, 1864. For her ancestry, see No. 577. He married second, April 7, 1866, Ella S. Latsch, who was born March 6, 1839. Mr. Todd graduated from the Onondaga Valley Academy and the Albany Medical School, and was thereafter duly licensed as a physician. In 1861, he was commissioned in the 12th N. Y. Vol. Militia, as Assistant Surgeon. Later he was commissioned in the same capacity in the U. S. Navy and served through the war. Shortly after the war, he was again commissioned in the Navy, and died of yellow fever while attending the sick, during an epidemic at Pensacola Navy Yard, in 1874. He was then Acting Past Assistant Surgeon. For some years he practiced medicine while a civilian, in Onondaga County, N. Y., but the greater part of his professional life was devoted to the service. The following was taken from the Baltimore Sun: “Died in Pensacola, Fla., acting Surgeon, George Brainard Todd, M. D. He was born in Marcellus, Onondaga County, N. Y., and graduated at the University of New York, at Albany. He also received collegiate diplomas from other schools of medicine, the last from the University of Maryland, in which State he resumed practice after the termination of the war of the rebellion. In the early part of...

Henry Perine Todd of Rochester NY

Henry Perine Todd8, (Caleb7, Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 22, 1839, died June 14, 1911, married June 18, 1879, Mary Stone, daughter of Timothy Marther and Elizabeth Ann (Swain) Todd, who was born Dec. 9, 1844. She is now (1913) living in Rochester, N. Y. For her ancestry see No. 582. Mr. Todd was born in Marcellus, Onondaga County, N. Y., where his father was a farmer at one time. When he was about ten years of age, the family moved to Dewitt, Onondaga County, N. Y. He attended the Academy at Moravia, N. Y. In July, 1861, at the outbreak of the civil war, he enlisted at Syracuse, N. Y., and became a member of Company B., 3rd New York Cavalry, and saw much hard service until early in 1862, when he was discharged for physical disability. He survived the very severe illness incurred in the service, however, and after the war moved with his parents to Spencerport, Monroe County, N. Y., where they purchased a farm. There he lived until 1908, when he retired and moved to Rochester, N. Y. At the time of her marriage, Mrs. Todd was a teacher of music in a private academy in Haddonfield, Penn. Her home was in Fayetteville, N. Y. She was born in Manlius, Onondaga County, N. Y., her father owning and operating “Todd’s Mill” at that place. Child: 1983. Harry Swain, b. July 11, 1880, unmarried in 1913, he resides with his mother in Rochester, N. Y.; he attended the Spencerport Union School, and the Brockport State Normal School; graduated from the University of Rochester,...

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