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Descendants of Chauncey Sears of Fall River, MA

As will be seen in what follows the Fall River family of Sears here considered – to which belongs Chauncey Howe Sears, an extensive mason contractor and builder and one of Fall River’s well-known citizens and substantial men – is one of some two hundred and sixty and more years’ standing in this Commonwealth. The family history and genealogy of the Fall River family follow in chronological order from the immigrant settler.

Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become one of the best known in its line in the country. Mr. Packard was born Dec. 11, 1836, in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), son of the late Josiah and Betsey D. (Bolton) Packard, and was descended from old and sturdy New England ancestry. The following history of his branch of the Packard family is given in chronological order from the American progenitor. Samuel Packard came from Windham, near Hingham, England, with his wife and child in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, in 1638, John Martin, master, there being 133 passengers on board. Samuel Packard settled first in Hingham, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1638. Later he removed to the West parish of Bridgewater, where the first interior settlement in the State was made. He was constable in 1644, and licensed to keep a tavern in 1670. His will was probated March 3, 1684-85, from which it appears that the Christian name of his wife was Elizabeth. His children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Jr., Zaccheus, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Mary, Hannah, Israel, Jael, Deborah and Deliverance. Zaccheus Packard, son of Samuel, married Sarah Howard,...

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

The Descendants of Thomas White of Marblehead

Thomas White is the first generation. His descendants who bear the family name stand in numerical order from himself to NO. 79. Small figures at the end of a name, thus, “THOMAS2″ indicate the generation to which the individual belongs. Figures in parentheses placed before a name, forming the subject of a distinct notice, thus, (2) THOMAS,” denote time numerical order in which he stands, and will be found by turning back to that number. Names in the family group, printed in large capitals, thus, “2. THOMAS2” i.e., number 2, Thomas, second generation, will be understood as subjects of future treatment, and may be found forward, under that generation, with the same number enclosed in parentheses before the name. This manuscript is currently undergoing a transformation. Give us a couple of days and it’ll be completely back. In the mean time you can read the digital book here: Descendants of Thomas White of Marblehead List of Article’s for The Descendants of Thomas White Michael and Joanna White Michael and Ruth (Rhoades) White There’s additional information still to come. Haskell Descendants The Haskell Family Will Of Roger Haskell, Of Beverly Mark Haskell Burial Expense of Mark Haskell Mark Haskell, Second Generation Mark Haskell, Third Generation Mark Haskell Fourth Generation Mark Haskell Fifth Generation Sixth Generation of Mark Haskell William Haskell Notice Of William Haskell Coombs Descendants Henry Coombs of Marblehead Marbelehead Massachusetts History and Records First and Second Churches in Marblehead Massachusetts Names of Rectors of St. Michael’s Protestant Episcopal Church, Marblehead,...

First and Second Churches in Marblehead Massachusetts

The first church in Marblehead was built in 1649. “From the earliest records of this town, it appears that as early as 1648, when ‘the Planta­tion,’ as it was called, contained forty-four families, there was preaching among them by Mr. Walton.” “Mr. Walton continued to officiate as a public teacher, though without ordination, about twenty years, till he was removed by death, in August or September, 1668, but a few weeks before the commencement of Mr. Cleever’s labors.’’ May 24, 1684. The brethren at Marblehead, finding a great incon­veniency in going to Salem, with the unanimous concurrence of the con­gregation, applied themselves to Mr. Samuel Cleever, who had been the minister among them for fifteen years and a half past, that he would take the office of a pastor, and themselves might be congregated into a particular society, for the enjoyment of all the ordinances in this place orderly, as in other towns and places in the country.’’ ‘The church was gathered Aug. 13, 1684, having fifty-four members. [Charity Pitman was one of the number.] SAMUEL CLEEVER, who had preached in Marblehead sixteen years, was ordained Aug. 13, 1684. Mr. Cleever was born at New haven, Conn., Sept. 22, 16:19, graduated at Harvard College in 1659, and died in the ministry at Marblehead, May 29, 1724, in the 85th year of his age, and of his ministry the fiftieth. ‘‘It is said that for forty-eight years he was never hindered from performing the duties of his office a single Sabbath.” JOHN BARNARD was ordained colleague of Mr. Cleever, July 18, 1716. Mr. Barnard was born at Boston, Nov. 6,...

Genealogy of the Adams Family

Jonas Adams married Sarah Jefferds (both of Salem) (published July 5, 1729), and lived in Salem. His will was made Dec. 22, 1756; and proved May 16, 1757. He was a mariner, and after his death his widow conducted an inn. Her will was made March 20, 1780; and proved July 12, 1786. Children: Elizabeth Adams, baptized in First church Jan. 30, 1731-2 ; married Caleb Griffith of Salem April 24, 1755; and died before 1780. Sarah Adams, baptized in First church Jan. 30, 1731-2; d. young. Samuel Adams, baptized in First church March l0, 1733-4; and probably died before 1756. Sarah Adams, baptized in First church March 21, 1735-6; married Jacob Bacon Sept. 16, 1790. Jonas Adams, baptized in First church March 26, 17378; was living in 1756 ; and died before 1780. William Adams, baptized in First church May 18, 1740; married Mary Flynt of Salem March 24, 1763; and had children living in 1780, when he was probably deceased. Daniel Adams, baptized in First church May 16, 1742; married Hepzibah Batchelder of Beverly March 14, 1773; and lived in Beverly. He was a master mariner; and from 1777 to 1781 he owned the Joseph Symonds place in Boxford. Children, born in Beverly: Josiah Batchelder Adams, born Oct. 27, 1774; died at sea. Daniel Adams, born Oct. 5, 1776; Mary Leach Adams, born Oct. 10, 1778; married Benjamin Blanchard; Hephzibah Adams, born Nov. 11, 1780; m. Freeland; Samuel Adams, born Oct. 10, 1782; married Sally Sugden Feb. 2, 1806; John Adams, born April 11, 1787; died at sea; Emily Adams, born Oct. 3, 1789 ; married Ebenezer...

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Edward Horatio Foster

Dr. Edward Horatio Foster, formerly a well-known medical practitioner of Concord, was born October 13, 1839, in Canterbury, N.H., son of David M. and Sarah (Bradley) Foster. He is a direct descendant of Reginald Foster, who settled in Ipswich, Mass., in 1635. His grandfather, Asa Foster, served in the French and Indian War, and under General Pepperell was at the capture of Louisburg. During the Revolutionary War Asa was one of General Arnold’s body-guard at the time of the General’s desertion. When he died in Canterbury in 1862, he was ninety-six years old. His son, David M. Foster, a native of Canterbury, followed the occupation of school teacher in his earlier days, and was greatly interested in politics. David’s wife, Sarah, was born in Brunswick, Me. Edward H. Foster attended public and private schools in his native town, and then entered Pittsfield, Mass. He graduated from Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1866. Dr. Foster first located in Bradford, Vt., remaining one year. For three years thereafter he was located in Marblehead, Mass. In July, 1872, after spending a year on the Pacific Coast, he came to Concord, where he practised for the remainder of his life. In politics Dr. Foster voted independently. He was President of Pass Creek Ranch Company, of Wyoming, and also of the Eureka Headache Cure Company, of this city. Dr. Foster was twice married. His first wife, whose maiden name was Ella M. Merrill, was a native of Marblehead. She had one child-Edward L. Foster, of Concord. On September 16, 1879, he was married to Clara B. Smith, of Lowell, Mass. By this marriage there are...

Mark Haskell, Third Generation

(5) AMBROSE3 (Mark,2 Mark1), b. in Marble­head, Dec. 5, 1698. Administration granted his widow Prudence, March 10, 1739. Fisherman. Dec. 21, 1725, he bought of Joseph Pitman, all his right in the mansion house, with the land, for­merly belonging to John Pitman, deceased, and now in possession of Mark Haskell, fronting on Main Street. He m. first, Jan. 9, 17124, Anna, dau. of Francis and Susannah Richardson, b. Jan. 22, 1699; m. second, Nov. 28, 1’728, Prudence, dau. of Matthew, Mary Farrington, of Lynn, b. Aug. 28, 1700. Three children by Anna: 11. AMBROSE4 bapt. July 4, 1725. 12. HUBBARD4 13. MARK4 bapt. Sept. 10, 1727. Three children by Prudence 14. WILLIAM4 bapt. Dec. 28, 1729 ; m. Oct. 21, 1758, Deliverance, dau. of John and Lydia Breed, of Lynn, b. Oct. 17, 1736. 15. MARY4 bapt. Oct. 24, 1731. 16. FARRINGTON4 bapt. Sept. 30, 1733. (6) MARK3 (Mark2 Mark1), b. Aug. 24, 1100. Administration granted his widow Susannah, who gave bonds with Philip Hubbard and John Merritt, June 5,1736. Fisherman. Married Dec. 28, 1724, Susannah, dau. of Philip Hubbard. After the de­cease of Mr. Hubbard she was appointed adminis­tratrix of his estate, and gave bonds with Peter Jayne, schoolmaster of Marblehead, and John Le Favour, of Topsfield, May 19, 1755. Four children— 17. CHARITY4 bapt. March 13, 1726; m. Nov. 11, 1753, George Wilson. Six children— CHARITY5 bapt. July 27, 1755; d. young. MEHITABLE JAYNE5 bapt. Dec. 18 1757. JANE5 bapt. Nov. 9,1760. SUSANNA5 bapt. July 28, 1763. CHARITY5 bapt. Oct. 6,1765. RUTH5 bapt. Nov. 8,1767. 18. MARK4 bapt. March 16, 1729 ; d. Aug. 29, 1811. 19....

Mark Haskell, Second Generation

(3) MARK2 (Mark1), born in Beverly; removed to Marblehead, 1696—7, where he died May, 1734. He was a coaster, and also a proprietor in the so ­called Plain Farm, which farm first and last had elicited much controversy and litigation between the several proprietors respecting the boundaries of their farms. This farm consisted of six hundred acres, and was originally owned by John Humphrey, to whom it was granted by General Court, March 12, 1637, and partly bounded on Hugh Peters’s farm and Coy Pond, which lies near, and on the western side of Legg’s bill, Salem. Sept. 5,1710, “Mark Haskell, and his wife Cha­rity, dau. of Ambrose Gale, dec’d,” bought of Benjamin Gale and Benjamin James, children, and joint administrators of the estate of their late father Am­brose Gale, “a parcel of land in the Coy pond land, lying in the township of Salem.” Feb. 9, 1731, he and his wife Charity sold to their son Ambrose, a part of a certain garden formerly in the possession of Dea. Ambrose Gale, deceased, containing 80 ft. front anti rear, and 54 ft. deep, bounded on land of Elizabeth Girdler, the street, and on Gale’s meadow. The same day he sold the remainder to his son Mark. June 25, 1717, he bought of his son-in-law, Abiel Pitman (son of John Pitman, deceased, first husband to Charity), for £17, all his right in the house of his father, “in which my said father-in-law now lives,” with a parcel of land at the west end of it. July 24, 1735, Charity Haskell, widow of Mark, sold to Hannah Goodwin, her daughter, 8...

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