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Legend of the Separation of the Comanche and Ute Tribes

The large spring referred to by Dr. James, Sage, Fremont, Ruxton, and the other writers whom I have quoted, is the one now enclosed and used by the bottling works at Manitou. Ruxton says the two springs were intimately connected with the separation of the Comanche and the Snake, or Ute tribes, and he gives the following legend concerning the beginning of the trouble: Many hundreds of winters ago, when the cottonwoods on the Big River were no higher than an arrow, and the red men, who hunted the buffalo on the plains, all spoke the same language, and the pipe of peace breathed its social cloud of kinnikinnik whenever two parties of hunters met on the boundless plains – when, with hunting grounds and game of every kind in the greatest abundance, no nation dug up the hatchet with another because one of its hunters followed the game into their bounds, but, on the contrary, loaded for him his back with choice and fattest meat, and ever proffered the soothing pipe before the stranger, with well-filled belly, left the village, it happened that two hunters of different nations met one day on a small rivulet, where both had repaired to quench their thirst. A little stream of water, rising from a spring on a rock within a few feet of the bank, trickled over it and fell splashing into the river. To this the hunters repaired; and while one sought the spring itself, where the water, cold and clear, reflected on its surface the image of the surrounding scenery, the other, tired by his exertions in the chase,...

Biographical Sketch of Louis Smithnight

Smithnight, Louis; retired; born, Saxony, Germany, Dec. 16, 1834; son of Frederick and Auralia (Woolford) Smithnight; public school education in Germany; came to the United States at 15; married, 1866, Nettie Kingsley of Cleveland; surviving issue, one daughter; after a brief period in Columbus, O., came to Cleveland for A. J. Wenham, dry goods, for seven years; in 1858, went to Pike’s Peak, Col., to search for gold; being unsuccessful, returned to Cleveland, and opened a drug store, which conducted business until 1892; still own store at 2511 E. 9th St.; enlisted in 1861 as a private in the Cleveland Light Artillery; became corporal, took part in many engagements, and captured the first Confederate cannon (now in the Public Square of Cleveland); after three months, returned to Cleveland; reenlisted in 1862, in the Army of the Cumberland, under Gen. Rosecrans; served until 1863, retiring as captain, account disability; in 1873, reorganized the Cleveland Light Artillery, as commander; later organization was known as Battery A; organized the Ottawa Shooting Club, near Sandusky, 0.; member Chamber of Commerce, Concordia Lodge, F. & A. M., Grand Army of the Republic; Revenue Inspector of the U. S. two years for Ohio, Michigan and Indiana; three years State Inspector of oil; always held a prominent place in Military...

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