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Biography of James H. Wright

James H. Wright, one of the oldest grain buyers in the County, residing at Arthur, was born near the town of Poland, Trumbull (now Mahoning) County, Ohio, February 6,1827 ,and is a son of James and Mary (Kidd) Wright, who were born near Poland, Trumbull (now Mahoning) County, Ohio, of Scotch-Irish origin. Rev. James Wright (father) received his education for the Presbyterian ministry at the Canonsburg College, and spent most of his life in preaching the gospel, first at Poland, and later at Westfield, Pennsylvania. He died in 1843 at the age of fifty-nine years. His father was Alexander Wright, who was an early settler from the north of Ireland, to Washing-ton County. He married a Scotch girl by the name of Esther Silcox. Robert Kidd (grand-father) was also a native of Ireland, was an early settler in Trumbull County, Ohio, and in religious affairs he was known as a Seceder in that day, now known as a United Presbyterian. James H. Wright was reared in his native County, acid in Pennsylvania, receiving the advantages of an ordinary education. In 1857 he came west and located at Arcola, which at that time contained but three houses, and was for several years engaged in farming in that vicinity. In 1873 he commenced buying grain at Hindsboro, where he continued successfully in business until 1886, when he removed to Arthur, where he has since resided, engaged in buying grain for the firm of Bartlett, Kuhn & Co. In 1848 Mr. Wright was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Rogers, who was a daughter of Samuel and Sarah Waugh Rogers. She...

Slave Narrative of Melissa (Lowe) Barden

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Melissa (Lowe) Barden Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Birth: Chattooga County, Georgia Age: 80-90 Place of Residence: 1671 Jacobs Road Ex-Slaves Mahoning County, District #5 Youngstown, Ohio The Story of MRS. MELISSA (LOWE) BARDEN, Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Melissa (Lowe) Barden of 1671 Jacobs Road, was “bred and born” on the plantation of David Lowe, near Summersville, Georgia, Chattooga County, and when asked how old she was said “I’s way up yonder somewheres maybe 80 or 90 years.” Melissa assumed her master’s name Lowe, and says he was very good to her and that she loved him. Only once did she feel ill towards him and that was when he sold her mother. She and her sister were left alone. Later he gave her sister and several other slaves to his newly married daughter as a wedding present. This sister was sold and re-sold and when the slaves were given their freedom her mother came to claim her children, but Melissa was the only one of the four she could find. Her mother took her to a plantation in Newton County, where they worked until coming north. The mother died here and Melissa married a man named Barden. Melissa says she was very happy on the plantation where they danced and sang folk songs of the South, such as “Sho’ Fly Go ‘Way From Me”, and others after their days work was done. When asked if she objected to having her picture taken she said, “all right, but don’t you-all poke fun at me because I am just as God made me.” Melissa lives...

Biography of Paul J. McBride

Every one who had had any relations with the Department of Labor in the state government during the last year realizes that Governor Capper could not have made a better ehoice for the office of State Labor Commission than when he selected Paul J. McBride for these important responsibilities. To his official duties Mr. McBride brought a long and varied experience, most of it obtained in the ranks of organized labor. He is in close touch with the men who toil and he also had that breadth of mind and sympathies which are the fruit of association with people and affairs in more than one field of work and in more than one locality. He had been a farmer, a machinist, both a worker and an employer, and for many years was active in railroad service. He was born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, June 8, 1860, one of four children, all of whom are still living, and whose parents were David N. and Jane (Clarke) McBride. His father was born in Lawrence County and his mother in Washington County, Pennsylvania. When a young man David N. McBride learned the tailor’s trade, but most of his career was spent as a farmer. When the news of the discovery of gold on the Pacific coast reached his part of the county, he was one of those who eagerly accepted the opportunity to become an argonaut, and joined a company of men at Pittsburg in 1849. They proceeded by boat as far as St. Joseph, Missouri, where they outfitted, and their party combined with others to the number of about 250. This...

Slave Narrative of Angeline Lester

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Angeline Lester Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Residence: 835 West Federal Street Story and Photo by Frank M. Smith Ex-Slaves Mahoning County, Dist. #5 Youngstown, Ohio The Story of MRS. ANGELINE LESTER, of Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Angeline Lester lives at 836 West Federal Street, on U.S. Route #422, in a very dilapidated one story structure, which once was a retail store room with an addition built on the rear at a different floor level. Angeline lives alone and keeps her several cats and chickens in the house with her. She was born on the plantation of Mr. Womble, near Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia about 1847, the exact date not known to her, where she lived until she was about four years old. Then her father was sold to a Dr. Sales, near Brooksville, Georgia, and her mother and a sister two years younger were sold to John Grimrs[HW:?], who in turn gave them to his newly married daughter, the bride of Henry Fagen, and was taken to their plantation, near Benevolence, Randolph County, Georgia. When the Civil War broke out, Angeline, her mother and sister were turned over to Robert Smith, who substituted for Henry Fagen, in the Confederate Army. Angeline remembers the soldiers coming to the plantation, but any news about the war was kept from them. After the war a celebration was held in Benevolence, Georgia, and Angeline says it was here she first tasted a roasted piece of meat. The following Sunday, the negroes were called to their master’s house where they were told they were free, and those who...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Melissa (Lowe) Barden

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Melissa (Lowe) Barden Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Residence: 1671 Jacobs Road Mrs. Melissa (Lowe) Barden of 1671 Jacobs Road, was “bred and born” on the plantation of David Lowe, near Summersville, Georgia, Chattooga County, and when asked how old she was said “I’s way up yonder somewheres maybe 80 or 90 years.” Melissa assumed her master’s name Lowe, and says he was very good to her and that she loved him. Only once did she feel ill towards him and that was when he sold her mother. She and her sister were left alone. Later he gave her sister and several other slaves to his newly married daughter as a wedding present. This sister was sold and re-sold and when the slaves were given their freedom her mother came to claim her children, but Melissa was the only one of the four she could find. Her mother took her to a plantation in Newton County, where they worked until coming north. The mother died here and Melissa married a man named Barden. Melissa says she was very happy on the plantation where they danced and sang folk songs of the South, such as “Sho’ Fly Go ‘Way From Me”, and others after their days work was done. When asked if she objected to having her picture taken she said, “all right, but don’t you-all poke fun at me because I am just as God made me.” Melissa lives with her daughter, Nany Hardie, in a neat bungalow on the Sharon Line, a Negro district. Melissa’s health is good with the exception of...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Phoebe Bost

Interviewer: Frank Smith Person Interviewed: Phoebe Bost Location: Campbell, Ohio Place of Birth: Louisiana Place of Residence: 3461 Wilson Avenue, Campbell, Ohio Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Phoebe Bost, was born on a plantation in Louisiana, near New Orleans. She does not know her exact age but says she was told, when given her freedom that she was about 15 years of age. Phoebe’s first master was a man named Simons, who took her to a slave auction in Baltimore, where she was sold to Vaul Mooney (this name is spelled as pronounced, the correct spelling not known.) When Phoebe was given her freedom she assummed the name of Mooney, and went to Stanley County, North Carolina, where she worked for wages until she came north and married to Peter Bost. Phoebe claims both her masters were very mean and would administer a whipping at the slightest provocation. Phoebe’s duties were that of a nurse maid. “I had to hol’ the baby all de time she slept” she said “and sometimes I got so sleepy myself I had to prop ma’ eyes open with pieces of whisks from a broom.” She claims there was not any recreation, such as singing and dancing permitted at this plantation. Phoebe, who is now widowed, lives with her daughter, in part of a double house, at 3461 Wilson Avenue, Campbell, Ohio. Their home is fairly well furnished and clean in appearance. Phoebe is of slender stature, and is quite active in spite of the fact that she is nearing her...

Biography of Amasa B. Campbell

The rapid development of all material resources during the closing years of the nineteenth century has brought business enterprises up from the day of small things to gigantic proportions, where millions of dollars take the place of hundreds and where men are required to handle millions as coolly, as carefully and as successfully as their grandfathers handled hundreds. All the history of the world shows that to grapple with all new conditions, to fill breaches in all great crises men have been developed and have stood ready to assume new and great responsibilities and have discharged them well and profitably. Many youths now taking their first lessons in practical business will work up gradually from one responsibility to one higher, and then to still higher ones, as did Amasa B. Campbell, Idaho’s great mining magnate, and will be, as he was, the right man for the place, when, in the march of advancement, the place is ready and they are needed in it. Amasa B. Campbell is a son of John and Rebecca (Snodgrass) Campbell, and was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, April 6, 1845. His father, a native of Pennsylvania, died in Illinois in 1845, aged forty-five years, and his mother, whose life began and ended in Ohio, died in 1892, at the age of eighty-six. Mr. Campbell’s boy-hood was passed in his native county, where he attended public school until he was seventeen years old. Then he went to Alliance, Ohio, where he entered the employ of the firm of Pettit & Nixon, commission merchants, as a clerk. There he remained five years, gaining a thorough and...

Biography of Nathan Brobst

Nathan Brobst, who died May 3, 1910, was one of the sterling pioneer farmers of Shawnee County, Kansas. In a lifetime of nearly seventy years he had experiences that identified him closely with many of the interesting phases of the history of the Middle West. He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, on a farm November 13, 1840, one of ten children, two of whom died in infancy and two of whom still survive. Their parents, Henry and Susan (Fullwieler) Brobst, were born in Pennsylvania, but moved to Ohio and took their part in the activities of the wilderness, where they developed a farm and where they spent the rest of their days. Nathan Brobst grew up with only such advantages as were supplied by the common subscription sehools of the time, and in fact gained his best education by travel, observation and experience, and by much reading. He was a great reader, and was really a student all his years. He was not a soldier in the Civil war, but one of his cousins was killed during that struggle. Following his schooling Nathan Brobst became apprenticed to the stonemason’s trade, and followed that for a number of years in connection with farming. A number of years before becoming a permanent settler of Kansas, he drove a six-mule team to Salt Lake City, and saw and experienced nearly every phase of wild western life of that time. He was a prospector for gold, was in the mining regions of Montana, and from there came down the Missouri River in boats, and on returning east had many intereeting experiences to...

Biography of Thomas K. Tomson

Thomas K. Tomson. A life of more than ordinary fruitfulness and influence came to a close with the death of Thomas K. Tomson at his home in Dover, Shawnee County, November 2, 1910. He was one of the ante-bellum settlers of Kansas. In the fifty years of his residence in the state his name became widely known and respected and as a farmer and stockman he was one of the most successful in his section of the state. He was in his eighty-fifth year when death called him. He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, September 25, 1826. He grew up there and there married his first wife, who died soon afterward. Though he acquired the tinsmith’s trade, farming and the handling of stock constituted his major vocations. In the early ’50s, with his second wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth C. Davis, and a daughter, he came west and for a time lived near Fort Madison, Iowa. From there he removed to Tipton, Missouri. While his family lived at Tipton he spent most of his time on a boat plying the Mississippi River. His occupation was the making of tinware and the selling of the product to stores in the towns along the river. Those were years when the strife between the anti and pro-slavery people was reaching its final stage of bitterness. Around Tipton, Missouri, the pro-slavery element was dominant and Mr. Tomson being a strong Union sympathizer found the community very disagreeable. To find more eongenial surroundings he set out with a wagon for Kansas in 1860. For a number of years after coming to this...

Biographical Sketch of Cary Rudolph Alburn

Alburn, Cary Rudolph; lawyer; born, Youngstown, O., Oct. 22, 1883; son of Frederick and Cecelia Luebben Alburn; educated, grammar and Rayen High School, Youngstown, O., degree B. A. at Western Reserve University, studied law at W. R. U. Law School and three years at Oxford University, Eng., where he received the degree of Bachelor of Civil Law; married, Cleveland, May 22, 1912, Helen Alice Whitslar, daughter of W. H. Whitslar, M. D., D. D. S.; head master of Cleveland Boy’s Home at Hudson, O., 1910; chief sec’y to Senator T. E. Burton, 1910-11; sec ‘y of Business Men’s Taft Club, 1908-12, and Advisory Board of Ohio League of Republican Clubs, 1908-12; member Civic League, 1913; admitted to the Ohio Bar in 1908; 2nd Asst. United States Atty. for Northern Ohio District, 1911-12; 1st Asst. United States Atty., 1912-13; treas. The Lakewood Yacht Club Ass’n; member law firm of Price, Alburn, Daoust & Alburn, 1910-11; member Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity; member Athletic, Tippecanoe and Yacht Clubs of Cleveland, and the United Arts Club of London, Eng., and the American Club of Oxford Eng.; recreations, yachting and tennis; Cecil Rhodes scholar from Ohio at Ox-ford University, Eng., 1905-8; member Oxford Varsity La-Crosse Team, 1906-8; pres. of the American Club of Oxford, Eng., 1908; delegate for City of Cleveland to National Conference of Charities and Corrections at St. Louis,...
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