George Emmett Todd of Clayton MI

George Emmett Todd7, (Caleb6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born July 1, 1834, in Chautauqua, N. Y., died Sept. 5, 1908, in Clayton, Mich., married Dec., 1854, Elizabeth Morrish, who was born Oct. 30, 1836, in Davenshire, England. He was a carpenter. Children: *1733. Anna, b. Oct. 16, 1856. *1734. Cora, b. Aug. 16, 1866.



George F. Todd of Morrisville NY

George F. Todd9, (Zerah A.8, Zerah7, Jehiel6, Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 3, 1860, married Feb. 15, 1893, Effie Knickerbocker, who died in Feb., 1905. He married second, Minnie Cole, who died in 1910; third, Jan. 2, 1912, Clara Hatch. In 1913, they were living in Morrisville, N. Y. Children by Effie Knickerbocker:



Biographical Sketch of Reuben J. Anderson

Reuben J. Anderson was born in Smithfield, Madison County, New York; he passed his youth and early manhood like most boys, and in the spring of 1853 came by water to California. He landed at San Francisco May 5, 1853, and followed mining for three years. He subsequently purchased 160 acres of land five miles



Biography of Melvil Dewey

MELVIL DEWEY AMONG the noted librarians of our country who have shown great efficiency, untiring devotion and unusual progressiveness in their calling, stands in the front rank Melvil Dewey, director of the state library and secretary of the University of the State of New York. Born December 10, 1851, in the rural village of Adams



Tuscarora Tribe

Tuscarora Indians, Tuscarora Nation (Skurū’rěn’, ‘hemp gatherers,’ the Apocynum cunnabinum, or Indian hemp, being a plant of many uses among the Carolina Tuscarora; the native form of this appellative is impersonal, there being no expressed pronominal affix to indicate person, number, or gender). Formerly an important confederation of tribes, speaking languages cognate with those of the Iroquoian linguistic group, and dwelling, when first encountered, on the Roanoke, Neuse, Taw (Torhunta or Narhontes), and Pamlico Rivers., North Carolina.



Stockbridge Tribe

Stockbridge Indians. A tribe of the Mahican confederacy, first known under the name Housatonic. They occupied part of the valley of Housatonic river, in south Berkshire county, Mass. Their principal village, Westenhuck, was for a long time the capital of the Mahican after the removal of the council fire from Schodac. They had another village



The Location of the Fort Ticonderoga

It is utterly impossible, from the Champlain text and map, aided by the best modern charts, and an accurate knowledge of the country, to establish, with any certainty, the exact position of the Iroquois fort. The location which I suggested was on or near Onondaga Lake, 4 leagues or 10 miles from the great Iroquois



Downfall of the Iroquois Confederacy

“The Pawnees, following the buffalo in his migrations, and having always plenty of animal food to subsist upon, are a much better fed and a larger race than those who find a precarious subsistence in the forest chase, while the woodland tribes, who, though not so plump in form, are of a more wiry and,



Oneida and Cayuga join the Iroquois Confederacy

“The Oneida and Cayuga,” says Gallatin, “are said to have been compelled to join [the confederacy.] Those two tribes were the younger and the three others the older members.” Zinzendorf, speaking of the Iroquois, says “the Oneidas and Cayuga are their children.”–Indian tribes of North America. “By the early French writers, the Mohawks and Oneidas



Onondaga Council Fire

All business between other nations and the Iroquois was brought to the council fire of Onondaga,(*) and the conclusion there reached carried with it all the weight of a kingly edict. The deliberations of the sachems were conducted with the utmost decorum, and a rigid adherence to their notions of parliamentary usage which challenged the



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