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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty satisfaction to our broad and far extended landed possessions as indisputable evidence of our just claims to the resolution passed by our pilgrim ancestors, “We are the children of the Lord”; and to the little remnant of hapless, helpless and...

1894 Michigan State Census – Mackinac County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Brevort Township – Charles Cowden, John D. Rivard, George W. Jones. Cedar Township – A. Wheaton, William A. Cornwell, Frank Peck, Edward Ganvung. Garfield Township – Nicholas O’Donald, William Rogers, Thomas Scofield, Patrick Collins, John Mahar. Village of Naubinway – Tennis S. Harder, Robert Moore, George Williams, Henry Slack, Frank La Londe, Myron Bruce, Dean Williams, James Lull. Hendricks Township – Francis Mellan, William N. Caffey, Ronald M. Corey, Albert Randall, Warren Struble. Village of Mackinac – L. O. Holden, John B. Shoman, Andrew J. Chapman, John R. Bailey, William Marshall, Louis J. Metirer, William P. Preston, Benoni Lachance, Patrick McCormick, Patrick Kerriegan, George C. Ketchum, Theodore Hammond, Adulphus St. Andre. Marquette Township – George Rogers, Noah Bergy, William Stowell. Moran Township – Chauncy Clouse, Artis McAllister, Neal McCullough. Newton Township – John Blanchard, Joseph La Belle, George Marr, Charles St. Andrew, Eli May, Samuel Rivers. Portage Township – Jacob Snyder, John A. Whitcomb, Jacob Stevens, John Fawcett, John Riley, Jeremiah W. Smith, James Duston, Lyman Smith, Henry J. Burrows, [Thomas Duston]. St. Ignace Township – John H. Andrews. St. Ignace City, First Ward – James B. Tamblyn, Joseph A. Juillerette, [S. W. Spencer, Jos. St. Petre]. St. Ignace City, Second Ward – J. H. Warren, Michael Lennon, Louis J. Monteith, Byron E. Cubley, Louis Veeder, A. J. Gennell, [F. S. Walker]. St. Ignace City, Third Ward – Daniel Kunter, Hugh McLaughlin. John SaVaque, Radolph Burgess. Ariel W. Burrows. St. Ignace City, Fourth Ward – Chester A....

Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.


Michilimackinac Indians (Mǐshǐma‛kǐnung, ‘place of the big wounded person,’ or ‘place of the big lame person.’ – W. J). A name applied at various times to Mackinac Island in Mackinac County, Michigan; to the village on this island; to the village and fort at Pt St Ignace on the opposite mainland, and at an early period to a considerable extent of territory in the upper part of the lower peninsula of Michigan. It is derived from the name of a supposed extinct Algonquian tribe, the Mishinimaki or Mishinimakinagog. According to Indian tradition and the Jesuit Relations, the Mishinimaki formerly had their headquarters at Mackinac Island and occupied all the adjacent territory in Michigan. They are said to have been at one time numerous and to have had 30 villages, but in retaliation for an invasion of the Mohawk country they were destroyed by the Iroquois. This must have occurred previous to the occupancy of the country by the Chippewa on their first appearance in this region. A few were still there in 1671, but in Charlevoix’s time (1744) none of them remained. When the Chippewa appeared in this section they made Michilimackinac island one of their chief centers, and it retained its importance for a long period. In 1761 their village was said to contain 100 warriors. In 1827 the Catholic part of the inhabitants, to the number of 150, separated from the others and formed a new village near the old one. When the Hurons were driven west by the Iroquois they settled on Mackinac island. where they built a village some time after 1650. Soon thereafter they...

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