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Biography of Isaac Newton Hoag

Isaac Newton Hoag, a prominent citizen of Redlands, was born in Macedon, Wayne County, New York, March 3, 1822. His paternal ancestors belonged to the Society of Friends for generations back, and had uniformly been farmers. He lived and worked on a farm until he was eighteen years of age and had the advantages of a very primitive common school education. His father died when he was eighteen years of age, and one year later the Macedon Academy was organized, and Isaac was one of the first students at this institution. From this time until 1849 he taught school winters and attended the academy and studied law summers. January 1, 1849, he graduated in law, having previously graduated at the academy, and received a diploma to practice law in all of the courts of New York, and the same day he determined to seek his fortune in the gold fields of California. He landed in San Francisco on the last day of June, following, having crossed the Isthmus and having been ninety-nine days in the passage from Panama to San Francisco, on the British barque Colony. This barque carried 100 passengers, who paid $100 each for their passage and board. They were becalmed about thirty days and were for that length of time on the short allowance of one small cracker and a pint of water a day. After landing at San Francisco Mr. Hoag and his friends went directly to the mines, and July 4, 1849, he dug his first gold from Horse Shoe Bar on the American river. In about three months he returned from the mines...

Biography of Clark Forster

Clark Forster, whose family has been closely identified with the agricultural interests of Ontario county, New York, for many years, is considered one of the most successful fruit growers of the district, making a specialty of apple culture. William Forster, father of Clark Forster, was born in England in 1792, and came to this country in 1817. For somewhat more than a year he lived in Massachusetts, then, for a period of two years, made his home in Clyde, New York, and finally decided upon Seneca, Ontario county, New York, as his permanent home. He obtained employment on the farm of Edward Hull, whose farm he managed for ten years, and then purchased one hundred and thirty. acres of land a half mile east of this farm, and occupied it until his death. He was very successful in its cultivation and left it in a fine condition to his sons. Mr. Forster married, September, 1823, Mary, daughter of George and Mary (Wilson) Caward, both English, the former born October 2, 1775, died June 8, 1867, the latter born August 14, 1778, died April 15, 1834. Mr. and Mrs. Forster had children: i. George, born November 24, 1826; died April 16, 1843. 2. Mary Jane, born July 26, 1828; died July 17, 1888. 3. William D., born March 29, 1830;; married, May i, 1867, Matilda J. Britt, and resides at Stanley. 4. Edward H., born February 28, 1832; died June 13, 1905. 5. John, born September 27, 1833 died February 18, 1911. 6. Ursula A., born September 15, 1835; died July 14, 1860. 7. Thomas W., born January 7, 1838;...

Biographical Sketch of De Witt C. Lapham

(II) De Witt C., son of Nathan Lapham, was born in Macedon, Wayne county, New York, in 1846, and died on the family homestead in 1909. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits during the active years of his life, and was prominent in the public affairs of the community, having filled with ability a number of local offices. He was a staunch supporter of the Republican party, and his religious affiliations were with the Methodist church. He married Amelia J. Finley, born in 1847, now (1911) residing in the village of Macedon, daughter of David Finley, of the same...

Biography of Nathan D. Lapham

(III) Nathan D., son of De Witt C. and Amelia J. (Finley) Lapham, was born in Macedon, Wayne county, New York, November 14, 1871. From his earliest years he was of a studious nature and made the best possible use of the educational advantages afforded by the Macedon Academy, of which he was a graduate. Subsequently he was a student in the Cornell Law School, from which he was graduated in the class of 1895, this institution awarding him a post-graduate scholarship. He was admitted to the bar December 26, 1895, and he established himself in the practice of his profession in the spring of 1896, at Lyons, New York, in association with Clyde W. Knapp, who is at present the county judge of Wayne county, the firm being known as Knapp & Lapham, and being dissolved after a period of two years. During 1899-98 Mr. Lapham served as clerk of the board of supervisors, and after the dissolution of his partnership with Mr. Knapp he practiced independently at Lyons until 1902, when he sold his interests to B. S. Rude. On November 13, 1904, he removed to Geneva, New York, where he commenced practicing his profession and won almost immediate recognition for the excellence of his methods. During his six years practice in Geneva he has been called upon to serve as the counsel in seven murder trials, in three of which he gained acquittals for the prisoner; of the other four cases one was sentenced to the electric chair, but is now (1910) tinder sentence, pending application for a new trial, one was sentenced to a term...

Biography of Mark Ashdown

Mark Ashdown, deceased, for many years a resident of Port Byron and Coe Townships, was, during his lifetime, one of the best known and respected of the many long time residents of this county. He was born in County Kent, in England. on the third day of June, 1851, and died May 31, 1907. He came to America early and in late years became prominent in local public life as an ardent Prohibitionist and the holder of various public offices in this county at various times. Not until early in 1907 did death finally claim Mr. Ashdown, after he had suffered for six years with paralysis. The late citizen of Rock Island County, here mentioned, was the son of Edward and Ann Bakurst Ashdown, both of County Sussex, England. Edward Ashdown, father of Mark, came to America in 1842, accompanied by his two sons, Henry and Mark, and after spending thirteen months in Macedon, Wayne County, New York, they returned to England, where the elder Mr. Ashdown died soon afterward. In the fall of 1850 Mark and his brother returned to New York State and again located in Wayne County. Until 1855 Mark remained there and in that year emigrated to Illinois, spending one Summer in Port Byron. Then going to Canoe Creek Township of Rock Island County, he remained until 1863, engaging in agricultural pursuits. Going into Coe Township in 1863, he remained until 1881, at which time he again moved to Port Byron, engaging in the manufacture of lumber and acting as local dealer in agricultural implements. Not until 1895 did he permanently retire from active business...

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