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North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their evidences upon the western (in dependent of all written history) that they have likewise possessed this continent during unknown ages of the past. The artificial mounds, fortifications, lakes and ponds with their original names and those of rivers, creeks, mountains,...

Choctaw Nation and the Greer County Dispute

The Dispute In The Right Of Ownership Of Greer County Between The United States And Texas. The petition of the Attorney General of the United States affirms that according to the treaty of Feb. 22, 1819 made by the United States and the King of Spain, which was ratified two years later, and so proclaimed by both the United States and Spain, and that by the third article of the treaty it was provided and agreed that the boundary line between the two countries west of the Mississippi River shall begin on the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of the Sabine River, in the sea, continuing north along the, western bank of that river to the thirty-second degree of latitude; thence by a line due north to the degree of latitude where it strikes the Rio Roxo of Natchitoches or Red River; then following” the course of the Rio Roxo westward to the degree of longitude 100 west from London and 23 from Washington; then crossing the said Red River and running thence by a line due north to the river Arkansas: thence following the course of the southern bank of the Arkansas to its source in latitude 42 north, and thence by that parallel of latitude to the South Sea. The whole being as laid down in Melish’s map of the United States, published at Philadelphia, improved to January 1, 1818. “The two high contracting parties agreeing to cede and renounce all their rights, claims and pretensions to the territories described by the said line. That is to say, the United States hereby cede to his Catholic...

The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew Jackson, who witnessed a similar one that of Tecumseh in council assembled with the Muskogee’s, shortly afterwards of which I will speak in the history of that once powerful and war-like race of people. Colonel John Pitchlynn was adopted in early manhood by the Choctaws, and marrying among them, he at once became as one of their people; and was named by them “Chahtah It-ti-ka-na,” The Choctaws Friend; and long and well he proved himself worthy the title Conferred upon, and the trust confided in him. He had five sons by his Choctaw wife, Peter, Silas, Thomas, Jack and James, all of who prove to be men of talent, and exerted a moral influence among their people, except Jack, who was ruined by the white man s whiskey and his demoralizing examples and influences. I was personally acquainted with Peter. Silas and Jack, the former held, during a long and useful life, the highest positions in the political history of his Nation, well deserving the title given him by the...

Slave Narrative of Anna Baker

Interviewer: Mrs. Richard Kolb Person Interviewed: Anna Baker Location: Aberdeen, Mississippi Age: 80 Anna Baker, 80-year old ex-slave, is tall and well built. She is what the Negroes term a “high brown.” Her high forehead and prominent cheek bones indicate that there is a strain of other than the pure African in her blood. She is in fair health. “Lemme see how old I is. Well, I tells you jus’ lak I tol’ dat Home Loan man what was here las’ week. I ‘members a pow’ful lot ’bout slavery times an’ ’bout ‘fore surrender. I know I was a right smart size den, so’s ‘cording to dat I mus’ be ‘roun’ ’bout eighty year old. I aint sho’ ’bout dat an’ I don’t want to tell no untruth. I know I was right smart size ‘fore de surrender, as I was a-sayin’, ’cause I ‘members Marster comin’ down de road past de house. When I’d see ‘im ‘way off I’d run to de gate an’ start singin’ dis song to ‘im: ‘Here come de marster, root toot too! Here come Marster, comin’ my way! Howdy, Marster, howdy do! What you gwine a-bring from town today?’ Dat would mos’ nigh tickle him to death an’ he’d say, ‘Loosahna (dat was his pet name for me) what you want today? I’d say, ‘Bring me some goobers, or a doll, or some stick candy, or anything. An’ you can bet yo’ bottom doller he’d always bring me somp’n’. “One reason Marse Morgan thought so much o’ me, dey say I was a right peart young’n’ an’ caught on to anything pretty quick....

Slave Narrative of Jim Allen

Interviewer: Mrs. Ed Joiner Person Interviewed: Jim Allen Location: West Point, Mississippi Age: 87 Jim Allen, West Point, age 87, lives in a shack furnished by the city. With him lives his second wife, a much older woman. Both he and his wife have a reputation for being “queer” and do not welcome outside visitors. However, he readily gave an interview and seemed most willing to relate the story of his life. “Yas, ma’m, I ‘members lots about slav’ry time, ’cause I was old ‘nough. “I was born in Russell County, Alabamy, an’ can tell you ’bout my own mammy an’ pappy an’ sisters an’ brudders. “Mammy’s name was Darkis an’ her Marster was John Bussey, a reg’lar old drunkard, an’ my pappy’s name was John Robertson an’ b’longed to Dr. Robertson, a big farmer on Tombigbee river, five miles east of Columbus. De doctor hisself lived in Columbus. “My sister Harriett and brudder John was fine fiel’ hands an’ Marster kep’ ’em in de fiel’ most of de time, tryin’ to dodge other white folks. “Den dere was Sister Vice an’ brudder George. Befo’ I could ‘member much, I ‘members Lee King had a saloon close to Bob Allen’s store in Russell County, Alabama, and Marse John Bussey drunk my mammy up. I means by dat, Lee King tuk her an’ my brudder George fer a whiskey debt. Yes, old Marster drinked dem up. Den dey was car’ied to Florida by Sam Oneal, an’ George was jes a baby. You know, de white folks wouldn’t often sep’rate de mammy an’ baby. I ain’t seen’ em since. “Did I...

Biography of Daniel W. Feemster

DANIEL W. FEEMSTER. An active and progressive system in any profession or line of business, when based upon principles of honor, is sure to bring success, and an illustration of prominence gained through these means is seen in the record of Daniel W. Feemster, who is the proprietor of an excellent mercantile establishment and a dealer in produce at Noble, Missouri. He was born in Lowndes County, Miss., in 1853. His parents, Rev. Zenus E. and Margaret (Maloy) Feemster, were born in South Carolina in 1813 and Alabama in 1817, respectively. The former was taken to Mississippi by his parents in his youth, and until 1869 was a resident of Lowndes County, after which he came to Ozark County, Missouri, locating at the head of Turkey Creek where the rest of his life was spent. He was Independent Presbyterian minister for many years in Mississippi, but after locating in Missouri was a minister of the Congregational Church until his death. He was a man of varied and extended information, was strictly self-made, and although he never attended school over three months in his life he was an excellent Greek scholar. He was a great reader and student all his life and had a fine library of choice books. Owing to the fact that he was always a man of delicate health, he was not subject to military duty during the Civil War, and during the struggle between the North and South he resided in the North. His father, William Feemster, was a planter by occupation, and he and his wife spent their declining days in Lowndes County, Missouri. They...

Biography of Hiram W. Lewis, Col.

Col. Hiram W. Lewis. In many important ways the city of Wichita expresses the life, ideals, and activities of the late Col. Hiram W. Lewis. In his time he was undoubtedly one of the most forceful figures and one of the ablest business men and citizens in the State of Kansas. When he came to Wichita about 1875 he had already acquitted himself with credit both as a soldier in the Civil war and as a business man. Born near Warren, Ohio, he lived in Ohio during his youth and on May 25, 1863, enlisted in Company E of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry. He went out as a private, becoming corporal, and was in many of the important battles of the great campaigns by which the states of Tennessee and Georgia were wrested from the Confederacy. He was wounded in the arm at Chickamauga. After his honorable discharge on May 15, 1865, he identified himself with the South and bought a plantation near Columbus, Mississippi. He remained on that plantation for ten years, and also took a very active part in public affairs. He served as sheriff of his county, and for several years represented his district in the State Legislature. Colonel Lewis during his residence in Wichita was primarily a banker. When he came to Wichita he organized the Kansas National Bank, of which he became president. Later with M. W. Levy he organized the State Savings Bonk of which he was vice president and cashier. Still later was organized under his direction the Gold Savings State Bank. All these banks are still in operation...

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