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Biography of Hon. Eugene D. Smith

HON. EUGENE D. SMITH. – This pioneer of the logging business of the Snohomish river, a portrait of whom is placed in this history, is a representative man of the Puget Sound country, and almost a typical American. Of large and fine proportions physically, self-reliant, capable of taking a hand at any business, even at politics or war, or, with a little brushing up, at almost any profession, he at present contents himself with being proprietor and patron of the handsome town of Lowell, Washington, and conducting large logging operations, on his own estate of four thousand acres in Snohomish county. He was born in Maine on April 30, 1837. While but a child of eight he suffered the loss of his father at Marshfield, Maine, and two years later began the battle of life for himself. Six years a sailor on the high seas, at the age of twenty-one he was commander of a brig. In 1858 he left that situation and came via the Isthmus to San Francisco, sailing on the well-known old steamer Oriflamme and Golden Gate; and by the autumn of that year he had drifted up to the haven of all Maine men, Puget Sound. At Port Gamble he found employment in a logging camp, but in 1862 tried his luck in the Caribou mines. This venture was quickly found non-productive; and in 1863 he began logging on the Snohomish. His original claim was on the site of Lowell. There he has since remained with but few breaks, such as going to Idaho for a time to repair his health in the sixties, and...

Conner, Lela Maude Ingersoll Cooke – Obituary

Lela M. Conner, 87, a resident of McCleary for 18 years and a previous resident of O’Brien, Oregon, died February 13 [1975] at a local hospital. She was born December 2, 1887, at Lowell, Washington, and was a member of the McCleary Grange and the American Legion Auxiliary at Kerby, Oregon. Her husband, Clyde L. Conner died August 20, 1974. Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Gladys Fattig of McCleary; four sons, Edwin Cooke of Cave Junction, Ore., Gordon Cooke of Port Angeles, Ellsworth Cooke of Grants Pass, Ore., and Jim Cooke of O’Brien; three sisters, Mary Atkenson, Gladys Carter and Grace Bernard, all of Elma; a brother, Ellsworth Ingersoll of Wenatchee, 20 grandchildren, numerous great grandchildren and great great grandchildren. Services were held at 2 p.m. Saturday from the Whiteside Chapel, Elma with the Rev. William Kennedy officiating. Additional services were held at 1 p.m. Monday from the Methodist Church in Cave Junction, Oregon. Burial followed in the Laurel Cemetery, Kerby, Oregon. Contributed by: Shelli...

Vanishing Towns and Old Settlements of Washington

Of towns that once had the promise of a great future, Whatcom is one. It was named after a chief of the Nooksack, whose grave is a mile above the Bellingham Bay coal mine. For a short time during the Fraser River furore it had 10,000 people, and a fleet of vessels coming and going. The order of Douglas, turning traffic to Victoria, caused all the better portion of the buildings to be taken clown and removed thither. The single brick house erected by John Alexander remained, and was converted to the use of the county. Eldridge’s Sketch, MS., 31-2; Coleman, in Harper’s Magazine, xxxix. 796; Waddington, 8-9; Rossi’s Souvenirs, 156-7. After this turn in the fortunes of Whatcom it remained uninhabited, except by its owners and the coal company, for several years, or until about 1870, when the N. P. R. Co. turned attention to Bellingham Bay as a possible terminus of their road, and all the available land fronting on the bay was bought up. In 1882 the agent of a Kansas colony, looking for a location, fixed on Whatcom County and town, and made arrangements for settling there 600 immigrants. The owners of the town site agreed to donate a half-interest in the town site to the colonists, but refused after the latter had complied with the stipulations. New Whatcom was thereupon laid off on the opposite side of the creek, and also a town called Fairhaven west of that, while other colonists settled at Sehome, named after a chief of the Samish tribe, and laid off by E. C. Fitzhugh, James Tilton, and C. Vail,...

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