Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Boyd Elias Pollom

The men who came to Shawnee County in 1871 were of necessity patient plodders, content to await the rewards of a developing civilization. There were no short cuts to fortune such as fired the zeal of the argonauts of ’49, but there existed sane and practical opportunities for the man to whom labor was a beneflcent and necessary festure of his existence. To such a class belonged William Pollom, father of Boyd Elias Pollom, the latter one of the successful agrienlturists and substantial citizens of the vicinity of North Topeka. William Pollom was born in Ohio, in 1838, a son of Joseph Pollom, of Pennsylvania-Dutch antecedents who was a pioneer of both Ohio and Indiana. William Pollom grew up as a farmer, a vocation which he followed throughout his life, with short periods of participation in sawmilling, as timber in his community was very plentiful during his young manhood. He was married in 1856 to Ann Boyd, of Muskingum County, Ohio, and not long thereafter moved to Clay County, Indiana, and then to Putnam County, in the same state. A loyal Union man, never afrald to express his views, he enlisted in the Fifty-first Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war and fought with that organization until wounded in battle, when he returned to Putnam County and thereafter did duty as a home guard as long as the war lasted. While he was greatly interested in local political affairs, he never sought office. Mr. Pollom was an upright citizen, of high moral character, who never used intoxicating liquor, and a devout member of the Methodist Church. In 1871,...

Biography of Harry G. Lambert

Harry G. Lambert has been a resident of Pottawatomie County since 1879, and for many years had been a successful farmer and business man in and around Belvue. He still owned and looks after a farm and is manager of J. Thomas & Son Lumber Yard. Mr. Lambert is of an old Ohio family. He was born in Morgan County at what was then called Seeleyville, now Woodville, October 10, 1868, son of George W. and Elizabeth (Maxwell) Lambert. The Lamberts were of German stock and were pioneers in Pennsylvania. The Maxwells were English people and were Colonial settlers in Pennsylvania. The grandfather was John Lambert, who died in Ohio before his grandson Harry was born. The maternal grandfather, John Maxwell, was born in Ohio in 1796, spent his life as a farmer and died in Morgan County of that state in 1878. George W. Lambert was born in Ohio in 1830, grew up and married there, and in 1852 crossed the plains to California. He spent three years in the far West, part of the time as a miner and part of the time as a school teacher. On returning to Ohio he engaged in merchandising at Seeleyville and was also a farmer. In 1879 he brought his family to Louisville in Pottawatomie County and the next spring he bought a farm five miles north of Belvue. He was engaged in farming in that community for fifteen years and in 1895 retired and moved into Belvue, where he died in 1906. He was a republican and a member of the Methodist Protestant Church and joined the Masonic fraternity...

Biography of Thomas M. Walker

Thomas M. Walker became a resident of Kansas in 1879. He was one of the pioneer merchants at Alton in Osborne County, but from that county his range of interests had become widely extended in recent years. He is now a resident of Atchison, where he had lived since 1901, and is one of the leading business men and bankers in the eastern part of the state. Mr. Walker was born on a farm in Owen County, Kentucky, August 15, 1846. His family became identified with Kentucky when it was a new western state. His grandfather, William B. Walker, was born in England and came to this country with an older brother. In Kentucky he located at Lexington, and became superintendent of the cloth manufacturing plant in which Henry Clay was financially interested. He had learned the trade of weaver at Manchester, England. Thomas M. Walker was the fifth in a family of seven children born to Delville and Lucinda (Sparks) Walker, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. Delville Walker was a prosperous farmer. In the issues which grew out of slavery he took a firm stand on the side of abolition and became one of the early members of the republican party. His son, James, fought in the Union army with the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry and at one time was provost marshal of one of Kentucky’s districts. Delville Walker died while the Civil war was in progress, but his wife survived until about 1905. The boyhood of Thomas M. Walker was spent on a Kentucky farm until he was fourteen, and he had only the advantages of...

Pin It on Pinterest