Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his mapsĀ and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Biography of Robert Morier

Diplomatist. Diplomacy as a profession is a product of modern history. As Europe emerged from the Middle Ages, the dividing walls between State and State were broken down, and Governments found it necessary to have trained agents resident at foreign courts to conduct the questions of growing importance which arose between them. Churchmen were at first best qualified to undertake such duties, and Nicholas Wotton, Dean of Canterbury, who enjoyed the confidence of four Tudor sovereigns, came to be as much at home in France or in the Netherlands as he was in his own Deanery. It was his great nephew Sir Henry (who began his days as a scholar at Winchester, and ended them as Provost at Eton) who did his profession a notable disservice by indulging his humor at Augsburg when acting as envoy for James I, defining the diplomatist as ‘one who was sent to lie abroad for his country’. Since then many a politician and writer has let fly his shafts at diplomacy, and fervent democrats have come to regard diplomats as veritable children of the devil. But this prejudice is chiefly due to ignorance, and can easily be cured by a patient study of history. In the nineteenth century, in particular, English diplomacy can point to a noble roll of ambassadors, who worked for European peace as well as for the triumph of liberal causes, and none has a higher claim to such praise than Sir Robert Morier, the subject of this sketch. The traditions of his family marked out his path in life. We can trace their origin to connexions in the Consular...

Jacobsen, Maria Helena Riggs Mrs. – Obituary

Maria Riggs Jacobsen, 80, of Portland, a former Baker City resident, died Dec. 25, 2004, at Portland. Friends gathered to honor her life on Jan. 9 at the Tualatin Elks Lodge. Maria Helena Riggs was born on June 2, 1924, at Lisbon, Portugal. She moved to Baker City as a child and graduated from Baker High School in 1942. She later moved to the Portland area where she had lived for 50 years. Maria was a homemaker and volunteered at the Meridian Park Hospital for more than 23 years. She will be remembered for her ready smile and jovial countenance. She returned to Baker City intermittently over the years for class reunions. In 1956, she married Elvin Jacobsen, who survives her. She also is survived by her daughter, Diana Gerba, and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of one’s choice. Cornwall Colonial Mortuary was in charge of arrangements. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, February 3, 2005 Transcribed by: Belva...

Pin It on Pinterest