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Biography of Edwin Carlos Lane

Edwin Carlos Lane, editor of one of the leading county-seat newspapers of Iowa, was born August 11, 1855, on the home farm of his maternal grandfather situated midway between Plano and Bristol Station near the main line of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, in Little Rock township, Kendall county, Illinois. He was one of a family of three sons and one daughter whose parents were Levi Hart and Emily Jane (Kendrick) Lane. The father was born in Lewis county, New York, in 1830, and was a son of Lyman Lane, a native of Suffield, Connecticut, who was born in 1799. Our subject’s great-great-great-grandfather, L. Lane, came from Scotland to New England and was the founder of the family in the new world. Lyman Lane continued a resident of New England through the period of his early life and married Miss Nancy Hart, a daughter of the Hon. Levi Hart, who was born in Wallingford, Connecticut, in 1773, and removed to Lewis county, New York in 1798. He was an extensive farmer and figured prominently in the public life of the community in which he lived, serving his county in the New York assembly in 1818 and was for many years county judge of Lewis county. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Lane removed from Lewis county, New York, to Kendall county, Illinois, in 1837 and the former acquired the ownership of a farm two miles from what is now Yorkville. He was one of the successful pioneer farmers of Kendall county, prominent in the progress of the community along agricultural lines. There he died at the age of ninety-seven years....

Biography of Col. James Montgomery

Col. James Montgomery, one of the free-state leaders in Kansas and an officer in the Civil war, was a native of Ashtabula County, where he was born in 1814, and was a cousin of the hero of Quebec. In 1837 he went to Kentucky, where he taught school. He moved to Pike County, Missouri, with his family, in 1852, and a year later located in Jackson County in order to be ready to enter Kansas as soon as the territory was organized and the lands opened to settlement. Some of his friends, among whom was Doctor Thornton, knowing him to be opposed to slavery, persuaded him to go to Bates County, Mo., by telling him that he could obtain as good land there as he could in Kansas. He accepted their advice, but quickly became dissatisfied and, returning to Kansas in 1854, purchased a claim from a proslavery settler about five miles from the present town of Mound City. It was not long until he was recognized as a leader by the free-state men of that locality. In 1857 he organized and commanded the “Self-Protective Company,” which had been formed to defend the rights of the anti-slavery settlers, and backed by this company Montgomery ordered some of the most rabid pro-slavery citizens to leave the territory. After their departure, he settled down to improve his claim, but later in the year some of the free-state men of Bourbon County, who had been expelled by George W. Clarke in 1856, returned to take possession of their homes along the Little Osage River. They met with opposition, and called upon Montgomery...

Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil war. Mr. Blue was wounded in the Battle of Rocky Gap, in Southwestern Virginia, promoted to second lieutenant for gallantry in action, and within a short time was commissioned captain. In one of the engagements he was captured and held as a prisoner of war at Libby prison and also at Danville, Va. The regiment was mounted and after the Salem raid was changed, by order of the secretary of war, to the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. Its final service was in a campaign on the plains against the Indians at the close of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, so that Mr. Blue was in Kansas during the early ’60s. After his discharge from the army he returned to Virginia, taught school, read law and was admitted to the bar of that state in 1870. In 1871 he settled in Linn County, Kansas, but in 1898 he moved to Labette County, and finally located in Cherokee County. There he became a leading lawyer, serving...

Biography of Charles R. Jennison, Dr.

Dr. Charles R. Jennison, of Leavenworth, a brigadier general during the Civil war and afterward a leader in the public affairs of the state, was born in Jefferson County, New York, June 6, 1834. When he was twelve years old he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, and at the age of nineteen years he began to study medicine. After completing his medical course he practiced for a short time in Wisconsin and then came to Kansas, settling at Osawatomie in 1857. Within a short time he moved to Mound City, where he remained for three years, and then went to Leavenworth. Doctor Jennison was one of John Brown’s stanch supporters. Governor Robinson commissioned him captain of the Mound City Guards on February 19, 1861, and on September 4th he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which became known as “Jennison’s Jayhawkers,” being assigned to the command of the western border of Missouri with headquarters at Kansas City. He determined to clear the border of guerrillas, and his a ccess in that military undertaking was such that General Hunter appointed him acting brigadier general, and he was placed in command of “all the troops in Kansas west of and on the Neosho.” At the time of the Lawrence massacre Governor Carney called upon Jennison to raise a regiment, of which he was made colonel on October 17, 1863, with headquarters at Leavenworth. Whils in command at Fort Leavenworth he was authorized on March 5, 1864, to raise and organize a post battery, and in the following July was placed in command of a regiment in the...

Biography of Ike N. Williams

One of the strong and growing political figures in Kansas during recent years had been Ike N. Williams. A natural leader of men and at the same time an able and industrious lawyer, it is but natural that his name should as it does appear frequently on the pages of political history. He had, since locating at Wichita, in 1910, always used his fine legal talents in the furtherance of what he had believed to be for the best interests of the city, merging the two characters of citizen and lawyer into a high personal combination. In his participation in various movements, he had stimulated discussion and had always insinuated his forceful personality in a manner that had redounded to the public good. Ike N. Williams was born April 12, 1877, at Big Rock. Kane County, Illinois, a son of David and Elizabeth (Nightingale) Williams. His father, a native of Wales, in his younger days followed the sea as a sailor, but after a few years decided upon a career as a landsman, and in 1849 made his way on a sailing vessel to America, where he was convinced he could make his fortune as a farmer. On first coming to this country he secured a property in New York State, on which he settled, and while residing there was married, in 1852, at Brooklyn, to Miss Elizabeth Nightingale, who was also born in Wales. When the family left New York for points farther to the west they journeved to Kane County, Illinois, there taking up their residence at Big Rock, in a small farming community of several hundred...

Biography of Dr. Leonidas Kirby

In performing the arduous labors of the general medical practitioner, Dr. Leonidas Kirby has been very conscientious in the discharge of his professional duties, is well up to the times in medical lore, and has the intelligence to properly apply his knowledge. As evidence of his skill and ability to adapt himself to circumstances, when he first commenced the practice of medicine, a child of G. J. Howells accidentally got a grain of corn in its windpipe and was in a dying condition from the same. Dr. Kirby met the father with his child in the street and performed the operation of cutting open the windpipe (tracheotomy), thus saving the child’s life. He has become one of the foremost practitioners of the State, and the people of Boone County, Arkansas, are fortunate in having him as a citizen of their section. The Doctor was born on the Greene and Polk County, Missouri, line December 1, 1850, the eldest child of B. F. and Serena (Bender) Kirby, the former of whom was born in Warren County, Kentucky, about 1828, a son of Tully C. and Nancy C. (Harrington) Kirby. The grandfather was also born in Warren County, November 11, 1802, his parents having been Jesse and Sophia (Choice) Kirby, the former being a Virginian and a son of David and Elizabeth (Torrent) Kirby, Virginians also. The founder of the family came from England and settled in Virginia long before the Revolution. He had three sons, David, Henry and Frank, the first mentioned of whom married in Virginia and became the head of the branch of the Kirby family to which the...

Biographical Sketch of Leslie A. and H. G. Breed

Leslie A. and H. G. Breed, farmers, P. O. Jewell City. Leslie A. was born in Erie County, Pa., December 11, 1855, removed to Johnson County, then to Linn County, thence to Missouri, and came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1873, and took a homestead and timber claim; and the father and son are now the owners of 320 acres of land, and they keep about 60 head of cattle and 120 fine head of hogs. Leslie A. held the office of Township Clerk for four years. He was married December 4, 1879, at McCabe Chapel, in Brown’s Creek Township, Jewell County, to Miss Elizabeth Morgan. They have one child –...

Biography of Camden L. Bloom

C. L. Bloom. One of the most picturesque careers in the mid-continent oil and gas fields has been that of Camden L. Bloom of Independence. By an unusual capacity for hard labor and by a foresight seasoned by long and active experience he made one large fortune, which was swept away in the panic of 1907. With a few dollars realized by mortgaging his home, he made a new start, and today his operations and holdings would constitute another modest fortune at least. His life began in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, March 14, 1868. His people, the Blooms, came from Germany to Pennsylvania about the time of the Revolution. His father was A. W. Bloom, who was long and prominently known in Kansas and died at Independence August 24, 1909. He was born in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, in 1837, and in that state he followed farming, though his chief business for a number of years centered in the rafting of extensive quantities of hemlock and white pine down the Susquehanna River. In 1877 he moved his family to Fulton County, Indiana, and three years later to Bollinger County, Missouri. In 1884 he made his next step toward the West, settling in Linn County, Kansas, and thereafter confining his attention entirely to farming. From Linn County he moved to Miami County, Kansas, and from there to Independence, where he lived retired until his death. He was a democrat in politics. A. W. Bloom married Rebecca MacCracken, who was born in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, in 1843, and is now living in Independence in the home her son has provided. Their children were:...

Biography of Abraham D. Berry

Abraham D. Berry, who now enjoys prosperity as a farmer and oil producer at Wayside, is one of the men who became acquainted with this part of Kansas when the Indians were reluctantly giving it up as a hunting ground. He has been a resident of Kansas almost continuously for forty-five years. As a pioneer he helped lay the foundation for the present magnificent prosperity of Kansas. Born in LaGrange County, Indiana, May 10, 1847, he went as a small boy with his parents to Livingston County, Illinois, received his education there, and spent the first twenty-one years of his life on his father’s farm. It was in 1870 that Mr. Berry first came to Kansas. His first location was at the old trading post in Linn County. He found employment in different lines for several years, but in 1872 returned to Illinois for a couple of years. He made his permanent settlement in 1874 and after his marriage at Trading Post in Linn County he moved in the same year to what is now Wayside. At that date, forty-two years ago, he located on his present farm. Mr. Berry owns 320 acres in Rutland Township in the suburbs of Wayside, besides a farm in Caney Township, and a Texas farm in the Rio Grande Valley. On his farms in Rutland and Caney townships there are now fifty-eight producing oil wells, and these would give him a fortune apart from his substantial interests as a farmer and stock man. His farms are thoroughly developed, and he has a complete equipment of buildings, modern machinery, and for years has carried...

Biography of Gilbert Leroy Jordan

Gilbert Leroy Jordan. Through persistent aspiration and unceasing labor, Gilbert LeRoy Jordan has won his way to the most satisfying and stable compensation of business life. Still a young man, with his best years before him, he is at the head of one of Topeka’s prominent business establishments, the College Hill Bakery, located at 1509 Lane Street, an enterprise which he has built up solely through his own efforts. Mr. Jordan commenced his business career without the aiding influences afforded by the possession of financial resources and has been the builder of his own fortune. He has kept persistently at what he started out to do, and has not allowed himself to be diverted from the attainment of his goal. Gilbert L. Jordan was born on a farm in the vicinity of Victor, Iowa County, Iowa, September 24, 1880, but has been a resident of Kansas since 1895. He is one of four children born to the marriage of R. W. and Caroline (Watson) Jordan, natives of Ohio. R. W. Jordan was reared and educated in his native state, and in 1875 removed to Iowa, where he was for some years engaged in farming at different points. This he continued until coming to Kansas, in 1895, since which time he has given up his agricultural activities and has engaged in various business ventures in different towns and cities. At the present time he is the proprietor of the Palisade Hotel, at Peabody, Kansas, and is one of that city’s prominent and influential citizens. Gilbert L. Jordan received his early education in the country schools of Iowa, dividing his boyhood...
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