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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Campbell Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Some time between 1766 and 1768, Alexander Campbell removed from Damariscotta to Steuben, and built a mill at Tunk, now called Smithville, on the east side of the river. It was the first mill there. In 1759, he married Betsey Nickels, who was born in Ireland and came to Lynn, Mass., with her parents when about six years old. From Lynn, she came with her brother, Capt. William. Nickels, to Damariscotta. Children of Alexander and Betsey Campbell were: James, Frances, Hannah, Peggy, Polly, William, Samuel, Alexander, and Betsey.

John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

Fort Frederick, Pemaquid, Maine

The English clenched hand, which answered the brandishing of the French mailed fist at Pentagoet, now Castine, was Fort Frederick at Pemaquid, that anciently known peninsula which marks the entrance to the Kennebec River. Parts of the walls of old Fort Frederick are still standing, its entire outlines are plainly to be discerned, and it is a favorite point of visit with the many people who make their homes in this part of the Maine coast during the summer months. Pemaquid, itself, is one of those long arms of rock, which are characteristic of the Maine coast. A good word picture of the locality has been painted by S. A. Drake, the chronicler of Maine coast history. “A belt of rusty red granite stretches around it above low water mark,” he writes, ” and out into the foaming breakers beyond. Pastures pallid from exhaustion and spotted with clumps of melancholy firs spread themselves out over this foundation. In the extreme corner of this threadbare robe there is a lighthouse. You look about you in vain for the evidences of long occupation which the historic vista has opened to you in advance.” While there have been many wild reports that the settlement on Pemaquid antedated that on Massachusetts Bay, itself, there is lacking weight of historical evidence to support this contention. Pemaquid was visited by Captain John Smith in 1614, but that doughty mariner makes no mention in his account of his visit of having seen any Europeans at the place, as he undoubtedly would have done had his vision encountered any such settlers. William Bradford, the conscientious chronicler of...

Biography of Sylvanus Sylvester Longley

Sylvanus Sylvester Longley, now living retired at Greenleaf, is one of Kansas’ interesting personalities. Few men have succeedad in compressing even within eighty-three years of life so many varied activities and achievements. Mr. Longley traveled practically over all the habitable globe before he came to Kansas. He was a pioneer in this state, and his business and civic relations in Washington County have rolled up a wealth of esteem which he now enjoys in his declining years. Mr. Longley is a native of the Pine Tree state, born at Foxcroft, Maine, September 15, 1834. He is of old English ancestry, the Longleys having identified themselves with the colony of Massachusetts. His grandfather, Zachariah Longley, was born at Groton, Massachusetts, helped the colomies fight for independence during the Revolution, and subsequently became a pioneer farmer in the State of Maine. He died at Foxcroft in this state before Sylvanus S. was born. Capt. Sylvanus Longley, father of the Greenleaf citizen, was born at Groton, Massachusetts, in 1797. He grew up and married in his native state, and then removed to Foxcroft, Maine, and located on land which his father had taken up some years previously. His active life was spĂ©nt as a farmer, partly in Foxcroft and partly in Dover. He identified himself with the whig party in politics, and at one time held the office of town trustee of Foxcroft and was also a captain in the Maine militia. Captain Longley married Miss Oreinda Garland, who was born in Massaschusetts in 1799 and spent her last days on the farm of her son Sylvanus near Greenleaf, Kansas, where she...

Biography of Charles L. Kaler

CHARLES L. KALER. – A real pioneer of the pioneers, who has wrought on the Pacific coast for forty years and more with display of energy and skill that have placed him among the leaders of the county in attaining its progress, the well-known gentleman, whose name is at the head of this article is deserving of representation in the volume of his county’s history. He is proprietor of the large green house in Lagrande and handles one of the largest nurseries of the state, having a full line of all varieties of both ornamental trees and rare shrubs and flowers. Mr. Kaler was born in Waldoborough, Maine, being the son of Charles L. and Mary Kaler, both of whom died when he was very young. His childhood days were spent with a neighbor, and when nine years had rolled by he inaugurated independent action and set out to Vermont, returning later to Maine, thence to Florida and again returning to Maine and then to San Francisco, where he spent two years. The next trip was to Vancouver Island, whence he made his way to the Caribou mines and four years were spent there in search for gold. He came back to Westminster, through Olympia and Cowlitz to Portland, thence to Salem, Mooney’s station, Waldo Butte and Umatilla, in which latter place he remained for a number of years, then repaired to Old Lagrande, and a few years after that time he went to Clove creek and took up a ranch, now known as the Willow Glen. Upon this farm he has placed much improvement. He has a nursery...

Biographical Sketch of Francis Harrington Glidden

Glidden, Francis Harrington; manufacturer; born, New Castle, Me., May 24, 1832; son of Joseph and Emily Harrington Glidden; educated Lincoln Academy, New Castle, Me.; married, New Castle, Me., Nov. 15, 1854, Winifred Kavanaugh Waters; issue, Francis K., Winifred, Emily, Frederick A., William T., Gertrude, Joseph F., and Mary Beatrice; early life, seaman, later dry-goods merchant; in 1866; entered the varnish business as salesman for William Tilden & Nephena, New York City; remained with them until 1875; came to Cleveland in 1868; in April, 1875, entered the varnish mnfg. business under the firm name of Glidden-Brackett Co.; later changed to Glidden & Joy; in 1890, incorporated under the laws of Ohio, as The Glidden Varnish Co., as it is at present, pres. F. H. Glidden; vice pres. F. A. Glidden; sec’y, F. K. Glidden; treas. Wm. T. Glidden; advance finishing dept., T. F. Glidden; pres. and director The Glidden Varnish Co., and director The Central National Bank; on his first visit to Cleveland, he was greatly impressed with educational advantages and business enterprises the city possessed, and with his children’s welfare in view, determined to move from Miami to Cleveland; he made no mistake and has seen the city grow from a population of 72,000 to over 600,000, with great possibilities for the future; member Clifton...

Loney, Alice May Reed – Obituary

Mrs. Alice May Loney, 68, prominent member of the Pioneer Methodist Church, died in a local hospital Sunday [March 26]. The funeral has been set for 2 p.m. Wednesday in a local chapel. She was born in Boothbay, Maine, July 27, 1875 and came to Walla Walla with her parents, Captain and Mrs. John E. Reed in 1884. They settled on the estate of Elisha Sherman one mile west of here. Sherman was an uncle of Mrs. Loney. She lived here until her marriage to John T. Loney who died in 1924. Her home has been at 534 North Sixth. Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. C. C. Dunning, two sons, Eugene and Roland Loney, a brother, Robert Reed, Walla Walla and seven grandchildren. She was also a member of the Narcissa Rebekah Lodge No. 2, the Maccabees and the Sunshine Club. [Interment Mountain View Cemetery] Walla Walla Union Bulletin, Mary 27, 1944 Contributed by: Shelli...

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