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Biography of George E. Wells

GEORGE E. WELLS. – The subject of this sketch is a man of great energy and power of adaptability, as is manifested in the occupations that have been engaged in by him during the years in which he has been in this western country, and it is pleasant to remark that during all of these varied undertakings, some of which have been exceedingly arduous and fraught with hardship and danger, he has manifested a stanch and unflinching courage, marked industry and enterprise, with excellent personal qualities of integrity and upright principles, while a good success has attended his efforts, both became of the excellent practical judgment used and because of his keen foresight and untiring efforts to do well whatever his hand undertook. George E. was born in Licking county, Ohio, on November 3, 1850, being the son of John and Sarah (Holmes) Wells. The father came to Oregon in 1859, settling at Oregon City and following the milling business for two years, when he repaired to Vancouver, Washington. The mother and three children then came and they all remained in that place until June, 1865, then they went to Lagrande, landing there on June 1, of that year. The father engaged in packing from Umatilla Landing to the mines of Boise Basin and others in this section. Our subject remained with his father one year in packing and then procured teams and continued the transportation of freight to the various points named until 1871. At that date the father quit teaming and went to dealing in wood in Lagrande and in that business he continued until the time...

Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson Davis. General Davis was wounded in the Civil War and came home to die. My father, Allen Williams was not free until the Emancipation.” “Grandmother Delilah belonged to Dr. Cree. Upon his death and the division of his estate, his maiden daughter came into possession of my grandmother, you understand. Miss Frances nor her brother Mr. Cam. ever married. Miss Frances was very religious, a Methodist, and she believed Grandmother Delilah should be free, and that we colored children should have schooling.” “Yes ma’m, we colored people had a church down there in West Virginia, and grandmother Delilah had a family Bible of her own. She had fourteen boys and two girls. My mother had sixteen children, two boys, fourteen girls. Of them-mother’s children, you understand, there were seven teachers and two ministers; all were educated-thanks to Miss Frances and to Miss Sands of Gallipolice. Mother lived to be ninety-seven years old. No, she was not a cook.” “In the south, you understand-there is the COLORED M.E. CHURCH, and...

Genealogy of Aaron French, Jr.

2 AARON FRENCH, Jr. (Aaron1), b. Apr. 19, 1767, Essex Co., N. J.; d. Jan. 31, 1850, Johnstown, O.; m. (1st), Mar. 8, 1792, Washington Co., Pa., Ruth Coe (b. Aug. 19, 1770, Morristown, N. J.; d. Mar. 19, 1835, Johnstown, O.), dau. of Elder Joseph Coe (Joseph, Joseph, Benjamin, Robert), and Abigail Moon, his w. Aaron French 2 m. (2nd) Oct. 8, 1835, Catharine Combs (d. Aug. 9, 1856), wid. of – Starkey. Robert Coe, ancestor of Ruth (Coe) French, came to Mass., 1634, from Suffolkshire, England, where he was b., 1596. Children of first marriage (none of second): 10 JOSEPH FRENCH, b. May 8, 1793; d. July 10, 1804. 11 JOHN FRENCH, b. Jan. 11, 1795, Amity, Pa.; d. Mar. 3, 1874, Onslow, Ia.; m. Oct. 1, 1818, Sarah Clark (b. Feb. 22, 1801; d. Jan. 7, 1891), dau. of Bethuel Clark, Amity, Pa. Ch.: AARON (b. July 4, 1819, Amity, Pa.; d. Apr. 28, 1909, Peterson, Ia.; m. Lydia Duke). BETHUEL (twin of Aaron; b. July 4, 1819; d. Mar. 24, 1904; m. Sarah Sinkey) MALINDA, d. JOSEPH (b. Mar. 19, 1823; d. July 3, 1900, Wyoming, Ia.; m. (1st) Catharine Sinkey, Johnstown, O.; m. (2nd) Grade Beaver). ELIJAH, d.  MANCY, d. JESSE CLARA (b. Nov. 17, 1832; d. Mar. 8, 1905, Manchester, Ia.; m. Laura Eveline Mudge). ELIZA ANN (b. June 1, 1836; m. Wilson Jenkins). JOANNA (b. May 22, 1838; m. Eliakim Wilson). ISAAC NEWTON (b. Aug. 6, 1840; m. Jane Orr). 12 IRA FRENCH, b. July 30,1797-8, Amity, Pa.; d. Dec. 24, 1878, Sumner, Ill.; m. May 4, 1820, Green Co., Pa., Joanna...

Genealogy of Mary French and John Clark

5 MARY FRENCH (Aaron3), b. 1772, Essex Co., New Jersey; d. Jan. 12, 1859, Johnstown, Ohio, age 86 yrs. 6 mos.; m. near Amity, Pennsylvania, John Clark (d. Jan. 28, 1840, age 69 yrs.), a Baptist preacher, brother of Isaac Clark, h. of Deborah French;3 he moved to Licking Co., Ohio, about 1810. Children: 35 MARY CLARK, d. m. (2). 36 DEBORAH CLARK, d. m. 37 LYDIA CLARK, d. 38 EUNICE CLARK, d.; m. Elder John Evans (Washington). 39 LUTHER CLARK, d. age 6 or 7 yrs. 40 MATTHEW CLARK, d. Mar. 10, 1875, age 76 yrs.; m. Mary Evans (Washington) and had ch., of whom are now living Lucy (Hanover), EUNICE (Gorsuch) and GEORGE WASHINGTON CLARK of Ohio, and AMELIA (Ulrey) of _Cal. 41 JESSE CLARK, d. 1828, age 28 yrs.; m. 42 JOHN CLARK, d.; m. Jane Creighton. 43 AARON CLARK (twin of Aaron42), d. 1865, age 63 yrs.; m. Amelia Evans (Washington). 44 MOSES CLARK (twin of Aaron43), d. 1854, age 52 yrs., unmarried. 45 REUBEN CLARK, d. Mar. 30, 1838, age 34 yrs. 46 ASA CLARK, d. 1842, age 31 yrs.; m. and had dau. MARY who m. Cary Milburn, Lawrence Co., Ill., where she d. leaving...

Biography of James Harvey Stewart

James Harvey Stewart of Wichita,who had been identified with Kansas for thirty years, is a lawyer by profession, is vice president of the National Bank of Commerce, is former state senator, and for twenty years or more had played a very infiuential part both in business and civic affairs at Wichita. He is now chairman of the Commerce Committee of the Wichita Commercial Club, had served as vice president of the Chamber of Commerce and is vice president of the Wichita Business Men’s Association, and is chairman of the Eighth District Congressional Republican Committee. At one time he was chairman of the Republican County Central Committee of Sedgwick County, and was a delegate to all republican state conventions for ten years before the primaries succeeded the convention system. An Ohio man by birth, he spent most of his early years in Iowa and from there came to Kansas. He was born at Hebron, Licking County, Ohio, October 9, 1854, and at the age of ten, in 1864, his parents removed to Lucas County, Iowa. He got most of his education in the country schools of Iowa. His father and an older son conducted a general store at Chariton, Iowa, and in 1871 James Stewart became a clerk in that establishment, and during the next nine years got a very practical business training. In the meantime he studied law at night under N. B. Branner, a very able Iowa attorney, and was admitted to the bar in 1878. In 1880 he was made assistant postmaster of Chariton, and soon afterward was appointed postmaster by President Arthur. After filling that office...

Biography of Charles E. Schaff

Charles E. Schaff, receiver for the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, was born on a farm in Licking county, Ohio. February 4, 1856. He is a son of the late Isaac M. Schaff, who was also born in the Buckeye state and represented one of the old families there of Dutch descent. In early life the father engaged in agricultural pursuits and later turned his attention to railroading, becoming connected with the train service of various roads. He passed away in Carroll county, Missouri, in 1888, aged fifty-seven years, having become a resident of Missouri four years before. He married Angeline Cleaves, a native of Maine and a representative of one of the old New England families of English lineage. She is now living in Columbus, Ohio. By her marriage she became the mother of seven sons and six daughters, of whom eight are living. Charles E. Schaff, the eldest of the family, was educated in private schools of Virginia and at the age of fourteen started out to provide for his own support. He was first employed as water boy on the Pennsylvania Railroad and initiated his business career with a wage of fifty cents per day. Later he took up railroading and was advanced through various parts of the train service, acting as supervisor and in various executive positions. His first official position was that of train master for the Big Four Railroad in 1889 and he acted in that capacity until the spring of 1891. He was next made general superintendent of the Peoria & Pekin Union at Peoria, Illinois, so serving until July, 1893,...

Biography of Zarah A. Eaton

ZARAH A. EATON. This enterprising business man is successfully engaged in dealing in timber, and is also the proprietor of a well-appointed mercantile establishment at Varner, Missouri He is a native of Licking County, Ohio, where he first saw the light of day in 1829. His parents, Joseph and Euincy (Curtis) Eaton, were born in the State of New York, the birth of the former occurring in 1796. They removed to Ohio in 1811, and in 1838 to Peoria County, Illinois, where Mr. Eaton died in 1857, and his widow in Woodford County, Illinois, in 1890. He was a Congregationalist in his religious belief, and she was a Methodist. Mr. Eaton followed farming throughout life, was a man of prominence and influence in the different localities in which he resided, and in politics was first an old-line Abolitionist and after a Republican. During the early part of his life lie taught school for some time. His father, Joseph Eaton, died in Licking County, Ohio, where he had farmed for many years. He was of English descent and his people came to this country over 200 years ago. Zarah Curtis, the maternal grandfather, who was born in New England, but was an early settler in Licking County, Ohio, was a farmer by occupation, and a minister of the Methodist Church for many years. He was one of the first to preach Methodism in the United States, and was a very eminent evangelist and an able expounder of the Scriptures. He was the father of the distinguished Federal general, S. R. Curtis, who commanded the Army of the Southwest during the...

Biography of Thomas A. Little

Thomas A. Little. One of the most interesting homes of Rantoul is that of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Little in the extreme northeast quarter of the town. They live there enjoying a happy combination of both the rural and the urban facilities. They have sufficient ground to afford Mr. Little an opportunity to indulge his favorite pastimes of agriculture, not without considerable profit, and they also have sufficient means to live comfortably without fear of the future and enjoy their many friends. Mr. Little was born in Licking County, Ohio, in 1851, a son of John and Charlotte (Coon) Little. His parents were natives of Ohio, and his mother was of an old and prominent family of that state. In 1916 Mr. and Mrs. Little attended the annual reunion in Ohio of the Coon family and spent two weeks in and around Newark renewing old acquaintances. Thomas A. Little was educated in the district schools of Vermilion and Champaign counties, Illinois, and became a practical farmer. He was also engaged in a mercantile business in Rantoul, from the spring of 1872 to 1905. At the age of thirty-five he married Lizzie Cole. Three children were born to their union, two of whom died in infancy. Lewis C., the only one to grow up, proved a boy of fine capacity and of studious ability. He was graduated with honors from the Rantoul High School in 1905, having done his last two years of work in one, in addition to clerking in a store both morning and evening. From there he went into a law office to study law, and...

Biography of J. S. Mason, M. D.

J. S. Mason, M. D., who was graduated in medicine over twenty years ago, has found his time and abilities more and more taxed as a. competent physician and surgeon, and in that field he ranks among the foremost in his section of the state. Doctor Mason is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, an honor conferred only upon surgeons of distinctive rank and attainment. He was born at Newark, Ohio, May 22, 1868, a son of Jacob W. and Elizabeth (Smith) Mason, both natives of Ohio. His father came to Vermilion County, Illinois, in 1881 and followed farming his entire active career. There were six children: J. Smith, a lumber dealer and hardware merchant at Oakwood, Illinois; Frank M., a physician practicing at Rossville, Illinois; Dr. J. S. Mason; Leora, living at home and a school teacher; Archie R.; and Etta Florence, at home with her parents. Doctor Mason grew up on a farm, attended country schools, and when about eighteen years of age began teaching in the country. This vocation he followed five years and in the meantime took special courses in a Normal school and acquired a first grade teacher’s certificate. It was through his individual earnings that he paid his way until graduation from medical school. He took up the study of medicine privately, and afterwards entered the Northwestern University School of Medicine at Chicago, where he was graduated M. D. in April, 1894. Doctor Mason practiced five years at Penfield, Illinois, and about six years at Rantoul, but since 1906 has been located with residence and office in Urbana. Doctor Mason formerly...

Biography of Isaac Divan

Isaac Divan when a small boy fought for the preservation of the Union, some years later came to this part of Illinois, built a home and developed a farm, and for the past nine years has enjoyed the comforts of retirement in his pleasant and attractive home at Ogden. Mr. Divan was born in Licking County, Ohio, September 26, 1848, son of Jacob and Ellen (Jones) Divan. His father was a native of Pennsylvania. There were nine children, six daughters and three sons, in the family, all of whom received their education in the primitive district schools of Licking County. There were no such opportunities for an education open to the boys of that day as at present, and Mr. Divan recalls the scantily furnished log buildings in which he learned his early lessons. When he was seven years of age his father was killed by a falling tree and at an early age he had to assume responsibilities in advance of his years. He was not yet thirteen when the war broke out between the North and the South, and as the war progressed he found himself unable to restrain his enthusiasm and passion for his country, and with about eighteen other boys went to Newark, Ohio, and became members of Company L in the First Regiment of United States Engineers. This regiment was sent to relieve some of the veteran troops whose time had expired. They recruited and disciplined at Todd’s Barracks in Columbus, were sent to Chattanooga, did garrison duty and other work in Tennessee, and after five months of active service Mr. Divan was mustered...
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