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Biography of William T. Hale

William T. Hale. This gentleman is a merchant, Lawyer and literature of Liberty; was born in 1857 at Liberty, Dekalb Co., Tenn., and is one of three boys of C. W. L. and Malissa (Overall) Hale. He received his education at the Masonic Academy, at Liberty, and has been a close student at home. At the age of seventeen he began business life as a partner with his father in the mercantile firm of Hale & son, and has continued in the same business, in connection with his profession, which he entered in 1884, having at the same time found leisure enough to indulge his literary tastes. In 1876 he married Lula Lewis, who was born in 1860, and who was the daughter of G. W. and Sophie (Allen) Lewis, of Lebanon, Tenn. He has two children: Charles and Herbert. Since finishing his studies under James A. Nesmith he has built up a flattering practice in Dekalb and adjoining counties. He is best known as an author, being the author of “Vernon Wild,” a novelette, which had a considerable local reputation, and of the two poetical volumes, “Violets,” and “Swallow Flights”; while his ephemeral pennings for the press would fill volumes. His poems are dainty, finished and full of feeling, and have been praised by Joaquin Miller and Gerald Massey. Below are given a few quotations, taken at random from his poems: “I think this thing as proper quite As anything e’er writ or spoken– No golden calf should loom unbroken, When overshadowing prostrate Right! “And I think the prettiest thought God had When he made all of earth...

Biography of Hon. John A. Fuson

Hon. John A. Fuson, an eminent practicing physician and surgeon of the Fourth District, was born in 1815, in Champaign County, Ohio. He is the third of seven children (three living) of James and Martha (Sneed) Fuson, both of whom were natives of Patrick County, Virginia. The father was of English descent, born in 1792. Two years after marriage he moved to Champaign County, Ohio, where he engaged in farming, occasionally preaching. He died in 1863. The mother was of French origin, born about 1795, and died in 1885. The subject of this sketch received a limited education in the common schools of his native county, remaining with his parents until he was twenty-two, when he came to Tennessee, and settled at Alexandria, Dekalb County, where for three years he studied medicine under direction of Dr. Thomas J. Sneed, at the expiration of which time he began practicing at Liberty, in 1842. In 1847 he married Martha L., Daughter of John W. and Lucy W. (Flowers) Allen, near Rome, Smith County. Mrs Fuson was born in White County, in 1826, and became mother of eleven children. The eight surviving ones are James; Lucy Jane,Wife of Chas. McCaverty of West Virginia; John A.; Elizabeth, Wife of Isaac N. Fite; George M.; Wm. Francis; Josephine, Wife of Chas. Williams, and Joseph Benjamin. In 1856 the Doctor purchased a farm in the Fourth District of Dekalb County, and moved his family there. He has always had an extensive patronage; is one of the most skillful and popular practitioners in the section. He has accumulated considerable property and wealth, but has lost heavily...

Biography of Col. J.H. Blackburn

Col. J. H. Blackburn, attorney at law and solicitor of claims, was born in 1842 near Liberty, Tenn. He is the third of eight living children of William and Ann (Hayes) Blackburn, the former born in 1808 in South Carolina, and the latter in 1820 in Wilson County, Tenn. The father, when a during man, located near the present college home, Wilson County, where he afterward married. In 1846 he came to Liberty, and continued farming on his farm lately bought, and since 1885 he has lived in Dowelltown, in feeble age. For fourteen years before the war he was constable at Liberty and mail contractor for six years. The mother is also living. Our subject was educated at Liberty, and in 1861 enlisted in the Federal Army, Company A, Fifth Tennessee Cavalry, and, though but eighteen, immediately elected captain. In November, 1864, he resigned his captaincy, and by order of Gov. Johnson raised a regiment at Liberty, known as the Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, and served as colonel of the same until the close of the war, and was honorably discharged in August, 1865. He was in several battles, the most important of which were Nashville, Chattanooga, Snow Hill and Milton, where he defeated Morgan. He also cleared of guerrillas the counties of White, Putnam, Dekalb and Jackson by capturing Camp Ferguson, after which even rebel sympathizers felt more secure. He is said to have been in 217 engagements, in all of which he was successful. He was wounded at Liberty in a charge by a rifle ball in the left shoulder, and ruptured at Big Harbor. From...

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