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Slave Narrative of Harriet Ann Daves

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Harriet Ann Daves Location: 601 E. Cabarrus Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: June 6, 1856 My full name is Harriet Ann Daves, I like to be called Harriet Ann. If my mother called me when she was living, I didn’t want to answer her unless she called me Harriet Ann. I was born June 6, 1856. Milton Waddell, my mother’s marster was my father, and he never denied me to anybody. My mother was a slave but she was white. I do not know who my mother’s father was. My mother was Mary Collins. She said that her father was an Indian. My mother’s mother was Mary Jane Collins, and she was white–maybe part Indian. My grandfather was old man William D. Waddell, a white man. I was born in Virginia near Orange Courthouse. The Waddells moved to Lexington, Missouri, after I was born. I guess some of the family would not like it if they knew I was telling this. We had good food and a nice place to live. I was nothing but a child, but I know, and remember that I was treated kindly. I remember the surrender very well. When the surrender came my grandfather came to mother and told her: ‘Well, you are as free as I am.’ That was William D. Waddell. He was one of the big shots among the white folks. My white grandmother wanted mother to give me to her entirely. She said she had more right to me than my Indian grandmother that she had plenty to educate and care for...

Biography of Charles R. Jennison, Dr.

Dr. Charles R. Jennison, of Leavenworth, a brigadier general during the Civil war and afterward a leader in the public affairs of the state, was born in Jefferson County, New York, June 6, 1834. When he was twelve years old he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, and at the age of nineteen years he began to study medicine. After completing his medical course he practiced for a short time in Wisconsin and then came to Kansas, settling at Osawatomie in 1857. Within a short time he moved to Mound City, where he remained for three years, and then went to Leavenworth. Doctor Jennison was one of John Brown’s stanch supporters. Governor Robinson commissioned him captain of the Mound City Guards on February 19, 1861, and on September 4th he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which became known as “Jennison’s Jayhawkers,” being assigned to the command of the western border of Missouri with headquarters at Kansas City. He determined to clear the border of guerrillas, and his a ccess in that military undertaking was such that General Hunter appointed him acting brigadier general, and he was placed in command of “all the troops in Kansas west of and on the Neosho.” At the time of the Lawrence massacre Governor Carney called upon Jennison to raise a regiment, of which he was made colonel on October 17, 1863, with headquarters at Leavenworth. Whils in command at Fort Leavenworth he was authorized on March 5, 1864, to raise and organize a post battery, and in the following July was placed in command of a regiment in the...

Biography of William Waddell Duke, M.D.

Dr. William Waddell Duke, physician of Kansas City, was born in Lexington, Missouri, a son of Henry Buford and Susan (Waddell) Duke, the former a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and the latter of Lexington, Missouri. The father, now retired, was a manufacturer of farm implements and harness of the firm of Buford & George Manufacturing Company. Dr. Duke attended the Kansas City schools until graduated from the high school with the class of 1901. He next entered Yale University and gained his Ph. B. degree in 1904, while in 1908 Johns Hopkins University conferred upon him the M. D. degree, following the completion of the regular four years course in that institution. He next entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as an interne and was graduated in 1910, while in 1911 he did postgraduate work in the University of Vienna. He was voluntary assistant in research at the University of Tubingen, Wurttemberg, in 1912, and since then has devoted his attention to the practice of medicine. He has carried on a consulting practice in internal medicine in Kansas City from 1912 to the present time and has manifested a most active and helpful interest in medical research since enteringĀ upon the study o1 medicine and has contributed much to the current literature of the profession. He is the author of a monograph entitled, “Oral Sepsis in Its Relationship to Systemic Disease,” published by the Mosby Publishing Company of St. Louis in 1918. At Los Angeles, May 18, 1920, Dr. Duke was married to Miss Frances Thomas, a daughter of Mrs. E. C. Thomas, who came from Kentucky to Missouri about 1900....

Biographical Sketch of Ray E. Frazier

Ray E. Frazier, the elder son of Nathan F. and Emma (Crook) Frazier, was born at El Dorado September 15, 1876. He received his education in the public schools of El Dorado and at Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1895, and began his financial training in a minor position in the Merchants National Bank, or which his father was president. There he evinced a marked aptitude for banking and applied himself so earnestly to his duties that upon the organization of the Citizens State Bank he was made assistant cashier and later vice president. In the death of his father, in 1907, be succeeded him as president of the institution, the executive interests of which he had since ably dirccted. Mr. Frazier inherited much of his father’s keen business acumen, and is poasessed of a pleasing personality and a faculty for making friends and retaining them. He had large interesls in oil and farm lands in Kansas and Oklahoma, and also owned valuable farm lands in Missouri. On June 17, 1903, Mr. Frazier was married to Miss Henrietta Ellet, daughter of Howard C. Ellet, Mr. Frazier’s father’s former banking associate and for many years a resident of El Dorado. Mr. and Mrs. Frazler have one daughter, Henrietta, born November 13, 1905. Mrs. Frazier, a woman of culture and of rare personal charm, is a recognized social leader at El Dorsdo and presided with grace and hospitality over a delightful home. Notwithstanding the arduous duties attendant to his large business and financial interests Mr. Frazier finds time to participate in the social and fraternal...

Biography of Joseph C. Wilson

Joseph C. Wilson. Aside from the prominance which is his in the business world by reason of his position as sales manager for the Burroughs Adding Machine Company, at Topeka, Joseph C. Wilson had the distinction of belonging to a family which for three generations have been active in the business, civic and moral development of Kansas. The name had always stood for honorable and public-spirited citizenship and for participation in progressive movements, and Mr. Wilson is proving himself a worthy representative of this old and respected family. Mr. Wilson was born in the City of Topeka, Kansas, June 28, 1880, a son of J. C. and Anna (Morris) Wilson, and a grandson of Jonathan and Drusilla (Cox) Wilson. Jonathan Wilson was born in Westchester County, Pennsylvania, in 1809, and was married in 1833, at Friends Church, Dublin, Wayne County, Indiana, to Drusilla Cox, who was born in Belmont County, Ohio, May 3, 1815. Her grandfather was born in Scotland and came to North Carolina prior to the War of the Revolution. Drusilla had ten brothers and sisters, all of whom lived to maturity and became heads of families. Jonathan Wilson died in July, 1886, at the home of his brother-in-law, Pleasant Bond, in his seventy-seventh year. Jonathan and Drusilla Wilson were pioneers of three states, i. e., Ohio, Indiana and Kansas, and history does not record any examples of persons doing more good than they. Their lives appeared to be filled with a desire to uplift and do good to others. In all the communities in which they lived in their long and eventful lives they were leaders....

Biography of James A. Masterson

JAMES A. MASTERSON. – It now becomes our pleasant privilege to outline the interesting career of the estimable gentleman, whose name is at the ehad of this article, and who stands as one of the prominent and representative men of Union county, being also aheavy property owner, and having manifested since an early day here ability that was master of the situation and has acuumulated his holdings from the raw resources of the county, while also he has maintained an untarnished reputation and has done much for the advancement of the county, being really one of the builders of Union county. In Lexington, Kentucky, on October 10, 1842, our subject was born to William A. and Elizabeth J. (Violet) Masterson, natives respectively of Kentucky and Pennnsylvania. The father was a mill wright and went to Lexington, Missouri, in 1843, and as early as 1851, brought his family over the barren trail to Lane county, Oregon. He took a donatin claim and gave his attention to farming and stock raising until September 8,1890, when he was called to the world beyond. The mother is living in Lagrande, being a property owner of the city. In 1863, our subject stepped from the parental roof and launched out into life’s activities for himself, mining first and then returned in fall of 1864, to the Willamette valley and fitted out, in connection with his brothers, wagons and came to The Dalles and they engaged in freighting from there to the mines of Idaho. Seven years were spent in this vigorous and arduous work, and then he sold his interests to his brother, also...

Biography of J. H. Stephens, Mrs.

Mrs. J. H. Stephens. As president of the City Federation of Women’s Clubs, an active factor in the Current Club and a member of the Carnegie Library Board, at Coffeyville, Mrs. J. H. Stephens occupies a prominent position in the social, civic and intellectual life that has made this city one of the centers of cultural interests in the state. Mrs. Stephens (Esther Logan) comes of an old colonial family of English origin. The Logans were pioneers in Kentucky, in which state Mrs. Stephens’ grandfather was born and died. Her father, G. H. Logan, was born in Somerset County, Kentucky, January 6, 1840. In early manhood he accompanied his widowed mother when she removed to Nodaway County, Missouri, where he later engaged in merchandising. In 1889 he went to Oklahoma and was the pioneer merchant at Kingfisher and continued there until 1906 when he came to Kansas and is the senior member of the Logan-Stephens Mercantile Company at Coffeyville. He married Julia Bradford, who was born August 25, 1849, in Missouri, and died at Coffeyville in March, 1914. They had one child, Esther, who became the wife of J. H. Stephens. J. H. Stephens was born in Linn County, Missouri, December 18, 1871, and was educated in the public schools. He entered business at Linneus, in his native county. For several years he was a cashier in the employ of the New York Life Insurance Company and for three years was a merchant at Kingfisher, Oklahoma. In 1904 he came to Coffeyville and entered the mercantile business being now the junior member of the firm of the Logan-Stephens Mercantile...

Biography of Forrest M. Hartley

Forrest M. Hartley’s talents made him foremost in the activities of college life while he was a student in Baker University. For a number of years he was actively identified with Kansas journalism and then returned to Baldwin City where he is now one of the leading merchants. Mr. Hartley was born at Indianola in Vermillion County, Illinois, July 26, 1874. He is one of the three children of George S. and Caroline (Vayhinger) Hartley. George S. Hartley, now a resident of Arkansas City, had for many years been a conspicuous figure in the political, banking and civic life of this state. Mr. Forrest M. Hartley had lived a very active life. He began his education in the public schools of his native locality. His parents lived for some five years in Illinois, removing then to Fowler, Indiana, where he received his early education, and he also passed part of his youth in Oklahoma. The father was Indian agent at the Osage Agency at Pawhuska, Oklahoma, and that was the family home for about eleven years. In the fall of 1889 Forrest Hartley entered the Baker University at Baldwin, and remained a student two years. From there he went to Wentworth Military Academy at Lexington, Missouri, was a member of its student body one year, and while there founded and became editor of the Wentworth Military Academy Trumpeter. That college paper is still published. While at Wentworth he also won a scholarship in Washington and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, which school he attended one year. However, his higher education was completed in Baker University at Baldwin, to which...

Biography of George G. Green

George G. Green, cashier of the Citizens State Bank of Little River, represents a pioneer family of Rice County, and had spent nearly all his life in this locality. He was born near Lexington, Missouri, November 16, 1869. His paternal ancestors came out of England and were colonists in Virginia. His grandfather, George Green, became a pioneer farmer in Western Illinois and died at Quincy in that state before George G. was born. The founder of the family in Kansas was William Green, father of the Little River banker. He was born at Quincy, Illinois, in 1831, grew up there, and in 1861 enlisted in the Second Illinois Cavalry for service in the Civil war. He gave practically four years of service as a soldier, substituting for another after his own term of enlistment had expired. Among other campaigns he was with Sherman on the famous march to the sea. He was twice wounded, bullets entering either side of the abdomen, and he carried those reminders of the war with him until he died. Immediately after the war he went to Lexington, Missouri, and engaged in farming and in 1873 arrived in Rice County, Kansas, where he homesteaded 160 acres 3Ā½ miles east of Little River. He also took up and developed a timber claim, and thus had 320 acres. The old homestead is still part of his estate. He was a successful man, though he suffered much from the injuries received in war, and he finally sought skilled medical attention in Kansas City, Missouri, where he died in 1891, at the age of sixty. He was a republican...

Biography of Hon. Hilory Butler

HON. HILORY BUTLER. – Mr. Butler is the son of Roland and Luc Emery Butler. He was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, on March 31, 1819. He resided on his father’s farm, where he was born, until he was twenty-one years of age, when he came to Lexington, Missouri, with a neighbor’s family, and followed farming until 1852. In April of that year he started across the plains in company with his wife, with the train known as the Hays and Cowan train, and arrived in Portland in September of the same year. After spending the first winter in Portland, in the spring of 1853, he went to Olympia, and a month later to Alki Point, where he remained for three months. He then took up his residence in Seattle, and at that time purchased two lots on the corner of Second and James streets for one hundred and twenty-five dollars, which he has seen been offered one hundred thousand for. He took part in the war of 1855-56. In 1854 he was elected sheriff of King county, which position he held for three years. In 1861 he was appointed Indian agent of the Duwamish and Muckelshute Indians, being relieved in 1862. A short time afterwards he was appointed deputy provost marshal for Washington Territory, which position he held until his time expired, or on the completion of the work. He also held the post of sergeant-at-arms of the legislature. Mr. Butler has given all his time to working at different enterprises in Seattle, having built on his present property the first frame house in that city, and is...

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