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Biographical Sketch of Joshua W. Alexander

Joshua W. Alexander, only son of Thomas W. and Jane Alexander, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, January 22, 1852. When he had reached the age of four years, his parents removed to Anoka County, Minnesota, and settled upon a farm. There his father died in 1859, and in 1860 his mother removed to Canton, Lewis County, Missouri, and soon after returned to Cincinnati, where the subject of our sketch attended school until July, 1863, when they once more made Canton their home, and there he attended the graded school until 1868, when he entered the Christian University at Canton, graduating as a Bachelor of Arts in 1872. The following winter after his graduation he taught one term of school, and began the study of law under Mr. A. D. Lewis, of Canton. July 15, 1873, he came to Gallatin and pursued his legal studies under Hon. S. A. Richardson until the spring of 1875, when he was admitted to the bar and entered upon the practice in Gallatin. In January, 1881, he became associated as a partner with Judge Richardson, forming the present law firm of Richardson & Alexander. He was elected public administrator for the term of four years in 1876, and in the fall of 1880 was reelected to the same position. In April, 1881, he was appointed city attorney of Gallatin, and in this position, as in the former, has won the esteem and confidence of the people. Mr. Alexander was united in marriage to Miss Roe Ann Richardson, daughter of Hon. S. A. Richardson, of Gallatin, on the 3d of February, 1876. Their fireside has...

Biography of Arista Tarvin Hayman, M. D.

Dr. Arista Tarvin Hayman, a physician and surgeon of St. Louis, was born July 8, 1874, in Monticello, Missouri, a son of Ervin E. Hayman. The father, a native of Missouri, was a son of Peter Deshields Hayman, a pioneer settler of St. Louis, who was a native of Kentucky and at an early day removed to Missouri, becoming a pioneer merchant of Monticello. Ervin E. Hayman was reared and educated in Monticello and became a pharmacist, devoting his life to that business. In politics he was a democrat and served as county treasurer of Clark county, to which position he was elected in 1892. He also filled the office of chief weigher with the warehouse commission of Missouri and was very active in politics, proving a capable official and standing stanchly in support of the principles in which he believed. He died in 1903 at the age of fifty-two years, while his wife, who bore the maiden name of Mathilda Mackey and was a native of Ohio, is still living, making her home at Kahoka, Missouri. In the family were three children, of whom Arista T. is the eldest; the others are: Herbert, living in St. Louis; and Vivian, the wife of J. L. Wees of St. Louis. Dr. Hayman was educated in the public schools of Luray, Missouri, and in the Kahoka Normal. After leaving college he served as deputy sheriff of Clark county and later, having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he was graduated from the Barnes Medical College of St. Louis, in which he completed a course in 1903, winning...

Biography of W. F. Cook

W. F. COOK. In looking over a comparative statement of the institutions of a financial character doing business in Willow Springs, we find them, in comparison with the same class of organizations elsewhere, solvent, prosperous and useful in the highest degree. The Willow Springs Bank adds no little to this, and is one of the best and most substantial of its kind in the county. Mr. W. F. Cook, its well-known cashier, was born in Lewis County, Missouri, February 2, 1868. Son of Dr. J. F. Cook, who is president of La Grange College, at La Grange, a position he has held many years. He is the oldest educator in the State of Missouri, and has held his present position twenty-eight years. The elder Cook is a native of Christiansburg, Kentucky, born in the year 1834, and a son of Joseph Cook, who was a pioneer farmer of Shelby County, Kentucky The Cook family came from Virginia to Kentucky, and the grandfather of our subject was a soldier in the early Indian wars. Still farther back his people were Revolutionary soldiers. W. F. Cook’s grandmother was a Flood, another of the early families. The father of our subject passed his early life in his native State, and secured a good education in Georgetown College. When still quite young he branched out as a teacher, and followed this in Kentucky until 1866, when he came to Missouri and took charge of the college he now controls. The building had been used as a hospital during the war, but he soon had things in order, and his college became noted throughout...

Biography of John Hornbeak

Success in business life is a guerdon that is very cautiously bestowed upon a person by the goddess, who in a measure guides, and invariably decorates, man’s efforts. And this same success is far more apt to come because of the pursuer’s genius or adaptability for his calling, than from any mere luck, ambition, push or demand. There are favorable opportunities in men’s lives, which, if taken advantage of, will take them far along the road toward the consummation of their ideals, and, too, there are those who have a strange intuition of that time and avail themselves of it. But never does this mysterious aid come to those without ambition and fixed purpose. Determined effort invites success. Included in the narrow circle of men who have fought the battle successfully is John Hornbeak, a prominent merchant of Sparta, Missouri He was born in Warren County, Tennessee, August 12, 1830, and is of German descent. His ancestors came to this country at an early date and settled in North Carolina, where they made their home for many years. The parents of our subject, James F. and Sarah (Johnson) Hornbeak, were natives of Tennessee, and in that State were married. The father was born in Grainger County in 1800, and about 1841 he and family moved to Greene County, Missouri, locating about six miles south of Springfield. There he resided about two years and then moved farther south, within five miles of Ozark, on a farm. where he lived until his death in 1864. He took an active part in the Civil War, but did not become a soldier in...

Biographical Sketch of Rev. Plant Senior Meadows

Plant Senior Meadows, (Born Feb. 15, 1841) Shawneetown, is a native of Lewis County, Missouri. At 17 in 1859, he was sold by the administrator of the Cecil Home, and a sugar planter at St. Mary’s Parish, Louisiana, became his master. Here he was employed at various kinds of mechanical work, until he was accorded his freedom, at 26 in 1865. Mrs. Cecil taught him to read, and during this early period, he made the best possible use of his spare moments, by reading all the good books that were available. As soon as he was free, he became a teacher and in connection with ministerial duties taught twenty-two years in Texas, and since 1908, in Shawneetown, Oklahoma. On Nov. 10, 1867, he was licensed and in 1869, ordained to the full work of the gospel ministry, by the A. M. E. Church of Texas. After 41 years of faithful service in that Church, which included a term as presiding elder, in 1908 he located within the Presbytery of Kiamichi, Oklahoma, and, becoming a member of it, was placed in charge of the Presbyterian Church at Shawneetown. Bethany and Pleasant Hill have since been added to his field. He has made a good record and is still doing splendid work at...

Biography of William Lenox McWilliams

Many interests claim the time and attention of William Lenox McWilliams, a foremost citizen of Miami, who is president of the First National Bank, being also extensively interested in stock raising and mining, and he is likewise one of the leaders of the republican party in Oklahoma. He was born upon a farm near La Belle, Missouri, April 29, 1865, his parents being George Washington and Lucy M. (Clapp) McWilliams, and is a representative of an old American family, his ancestors having been passengers on the Mayflower. The father fought in the Civil war and gave up his life for his country. He was a native of Hardin county, Kentucky, while the mother was born in Lewis county, Missouri. William L. McWilliams, the only son in the family, spent his boyhood upon the home farm and attended the common schools near La Belle, while later he entered Western Academy, through which he worked his way. For a year he taught school at Ravenna, Nebraska, after which he was employed by an implement house there, and then became a student at the Louisville (Ky.) Medical College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1891. For three months he followed his profession at Melrose, Kansas, and in June, 1891, he located at Miami, becoming the pioneer physician here. He secured from the Miami Townsite Company the first deed ever issued to a white man in Indian Territory. Miami was at that time situated in the Quapaw agency, and he continued in practice here until 1917, his professional labors being attended with a gratifying measure of success as he demonstrated...

Abell, Wendell H. – Obituary

Island City, Oregon Wendell H. Abell, 81, of Island City died Saturday at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Boise. Viewing will be from 4 to 6 p.m. today at Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 Seventh St. A graveside service will begin at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Island City Cemetery. Mr. Abell was born Dec. 23, 1924, to George and Josephine Graham Abell in La Grange, Mo. He had polio as a child. The family made three trips to Oregon before finally settling here. He began working in a lumber yard in Portland at the age of 16. On May 6, 1952, he married Constance Ott in La Grande. He worked for Hydes’ Market and Zimmerman’s until his retirement but continued to work part-time at Zimmerman’s. He served as mayor of Island City in 1961 and 1962, and was a member of the Island City Fire Department. He served on the Island City School Board and Island City City Council, and was a past member of the Lions Club. He enjoyed fishing on Catherine Creek, trips to the Mormon Basin with his brothers, trips around the valley, working in his yard and socializing. Survivors include his wife of Island City; a son and daughter-in-law, Steve and Debra Abell of Portland; siblings and their spouses, Bernard and Shelly Abell of La Grande, Leon Abell and his companion Beverly Britian of Milton-Freewater, Homer Abell of North Powder, and Eva and John Kimmelshue of Hood River; six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and other relatives. Two sons, Terry Lee Abell and Robert Earl Abell, two brothers Roy Lee and Robert Earl Abell, and...

Woodyard, James A. – Obituary

J. A. Woodyard Is Laid To Rest A Minister and Servant of God Has Been Called to His Reward Elder J. A. Woodyard died at the home of his son-in-law in North Kittitas precinct twelve miles north of this city, Friday morning at 12:30, June 7, 1912. The remains were brought to this city and placed in charge of Ross & Inman who prepared for the same burial. The funeral took place from the Christian church, Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The remains were followed to their last resting place by a considerable number of his old time friends and neighbors. Rev. A. L. Crim delivered the funeral discourse in which he paid a glowing tribute to his memory and consoled the bereaved in commending them to follow in his footsteps. J. A. Woodyard was born in Switzerland County, Indiana, June 10, 1829, but was reared to manhood in Grant County, Kentucky. August 23, 1849 he was married to Miss Mary J. Maddox, Owen county, Kentucky. In 1854 their family moved to Saugamon County, Illinois, where they lived two years, moving to Lewis County, Missouri in 1856. In 1879 he embarked in the mercantile business and after a few years was burned out, leaving him almost penniless. In 1874 he was ordained to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ, which he continued to do up to within a few weeks of the end. He had an appointment to preach at the Reecer creek school house three weeks previous to his death, but was unable to fill his engagement on account of a stroke of paralysis two days previous, which...

Russell Todd of Lansing MI

Russell Todd7, (Chauncey6, Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1 born Jan. 5, 1830, died Feb. 25, 1907, married Sept. 10, 1875, Cora A. Brown. He was ordained to the deaconate by Bishop DeLancey in 1860 and to the priesthood the following year by the same bishop. His various charges have been: Morris (assistant) Westmoreland, Clark’s Mills, Augusta, Oriskany Falls and general missionary work in Chenango County, all in New York; Caro, Michigan; again in New York at Whitney’s Point; then in Missouri, at Lebanon and Marshfield, Cape Girarfeau and Canton. At the close of his labors at the latter place, his health had failed so much that he retired from the active ministry, returning to Lebanon to live. There he remained until 1904 when, with his family, he removed to Lansing, Michigan, where he died. Children: *1257. Agnes Goodrich, b. Dec. 19, 1876. 1258. Russell Hobart, b. Dec. 24, 1878, d. Jan. 9, 1893. *1259. Edward Robertson, b. Sept. 21, 1880. *1260. Mary Louise, b. March 31, 1884. 1261. Cora Whittingham, b. Jan. 10, 1887, m. Feb. 15, 1919, John Simeon Cleavinger. 1262. Virginia Anna McCoun, b. Feb. 10, 1892, d. July 21,...

Biography of Benjamin Harper

The subject of this sketch needs no introduction to the older generation of Rock Island County, the larger enterprises of which he was intimately associated with throughout the many years of his residence here. Benjamin Harper was born February 12, 1817, in the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died April 3, 1887, in the City of Rock Island, Illinois. When about fourteen years of age his parents removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he served his apprenticeship to the wagon-maker’s trade, upon completion of which, that spirit of bold initiative and energy which characterized his whole after life, asserted itself in a determination to launch out upon an independent business career. The story of his start, and his rapid conquest of fortune, affords an interesting contrast to the conditions of success demanded by our modern youth. Young Benjamin’s father was a small farmer, on what was then the Western frontier. Naturally, he possessed scant means that he could afford to venture as a capital stake for his young son, but the boy needed only half a chance, as the event will show. Mr. Harper happened to have in his cellar a considerable stock of cider. This he gave to Benjamin, telling him to dispose of it as he pleased. Young Harper loaded the cider on to a flat-boat, floated it down the Ohio River to St. Louis, and sold it. With the money this gained he purchased a stock of general merchandise, and pushing North to Piqua, Ohio, there he set up in business, continuing prosperously until the year 1838, when he removed his stock to Tully, Lewis County, near...
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