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Prominent White Men among the Chickasaws

At an early day a few white men of culture and of good morals, fascinated with the wild and romantic freedom and simplicity of the Chickasaw life, cast their lot among that brave and patriotic nation of people. I read an article published in Mississippi a few years ago, which stated that a man by the name of McIntosh, commissioned by British authorities to visit the Chickasaw Nation and endeavor to keep up its ancient hostility to the French, was so delighted with the customs and manners of that brave, free and hospitable people that, after the accomplishment of his mission, he remained among them; then marrying a Chickasaw woman he became identified with the tribe; that he became an influential character among the Chickasaws; that he found the whole Nation living in one large village in the “Chickasaw Old Fields”; that he persuaded them to scatter, take possession of the most fertile and watered lands, and live where game was more plentiful; that he planted a colony at a place called Tokshish (corruption of Takshi-pro. Tark-shih, and sig. Bashful) several miles south of Pontotoc; that this colony became the favorite residence of the white renegades, etc. All of which is without even a shadow of truth. True, a man by the name of McIntosh once visited the Chickasaw Nation as stated; but after his diplomacy was accomplished, departed and returned no more. There never was a McIntosh identified in any way with the Chickasaws at that early day, nor has there been one from that day to this. The only white men adopted and identified with the Chickasaws at that early...

Natchez Trace

In 1792, in a council held at Chickasaw Bluffs, where Memphis, Tennessee, is now located, a treaty was made with the Chickasaws, in which they granted the United States the right of way through their territory for a public road to be opened from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi. This road was long known, and no doubt, remembered by many at the present time by the name “Natchez Trace.” It crossed the Tennessee River at a point then known as “Colberts Ferry,” and passed through the present counties of Tishomingo, Ittiwamba, Lee, Pantotoc, Chickasaw, Choctaw, thence on to Natchez, and soon became the great and only thoroughfare for emigrants passing from the older states to Mississippi, Louisiana and South Arkansas. Soon after its opening, it was crowded by fortune seekers and adventurers of all descriptions and characters, some as bad as it was possible for them to be, and none as good as they might be. One of the most noted desperadoes in those early days of Mississippi’s history was a man named Mason, who, with his gang of thieves and cut-throats, established himself at a point on the Ohio river then called “The Cave in the Rock,” and about one hundred miles above its junction with the Mississippi river. There, under the disguise of keeping a store for the accommodation of emigrants, keel and flat boatmen passing up and down the river, he enticed them into his power, murdered and robbed them; then sent their boats and contents to New Orleans, through the hands of his accomplices to be sold. He, at length, left “The Cave in the Rock,”...

Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians, obtain their consent and select a suitable location. Rev. T. C. Stewart, then a young licentiate, offered himself as a companion to Mr. Humphries. They first visited the Muskogee’s (Creeks), who, in a council of the Nation, declined their proposition. They then traveled through Alabama into Mississippi, and proposed to establish a mission among the Chickasaws. They found them on the eve of holding a council of the Nation to elect a king. In that council, held in 1820, permission was granted the missionaries to establish missions in their Nation, and a charter was signed by the newly chosen king. The two missionaries then returned to South Carolina. During the return Mr. Humphries concluded that he was not called to preach to the untaught North American Indians. But the Rev. T. C. Stewart, during the same journey, firmly resolved to undertake the self-denying work, and offered to take charge of the contemplated mission. The Synod gladly accepted, and he at once commenced making preparations to enter upon the life of a missionary to the Chickasaws. In January 1821, he reached the place chosen for a station, and named it Monroe Station, in honor of James Monroe, the then president of the United States. Mr. Stewart was the only missionary. Two men, however, accompanied him...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Pearl V. Sisson

(See Cordery) Pearl Victoria, daughter of J. F. and Cecilia (Gibson) Haas was born at Tupelo, Lee County Mississippi on August 29, 1879. She married at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory December 4, 1893 Charles Harris Sisson, born November 26, 1859. They are the parents of: Charles Harris born November 5, 1894; Jessie May born July 2, 1896; Sue born December 14, 1898; Mary born January 13, 1900 and Emma Pauline born May 8. 1902. Charles Harris Sisson was appointed Circuit Judge of the Cherokee Nation on May 1, 1897 and elected to Council from Illinois District on August 3,...

Biography of Jesse N. Nelson

JESSE N. NELSON. The business in which Jesse N. Nelson is engaged is a most important one, and he has found that since engaging in it his time has been fully occupied. He is the proprietor of a mill and cotton-gin at Buford and as a means of livelihood he has found that this occupation has been reasonably successful. He is a native of Pontotock (now Lee) County, Miss.. born February 8, 1858, a son of William and Martha (Carter) Nelson, both of whom were born in Mississippi, and were there reared, educated and married. In 1870 they removed to Arkansas and located in the vicinity of Buford on a woodland farm which he cleared and tilled until his death, being also engaged in cotton-ginning and merchandising. He was a shrewd and far-seeing man of affairs, made a success of nearly everything he undertook, and eventually became wealthy. He met with some reverses, for his mill and gin were once burned downed and at another time they were blown down; but his energy soon retrieved these losses. Throughout the Civil War he was a member of Forrest’s cavalry, serving in the capacity of captain part of the time, and was a participant in many battles. He returned to the pursuits of civil life after the war was over, became well and favorably known throughout the northern part of the State and counted his friends in his own community by the score. It was largely through his influence that the post office at Buford was established, and in other ways he showed himself to be a public spirited-citizen. He was...

Biography of George Newton Nelson

GEORGE NEWTON NELSON. This successful general merchant of Buford, Arkansas, is also the efficient postmaster of the place, a position to which he was appointed by President Cleveland in 1885. Although young in years, he has shown commercial ability of a high order, and has proven it to be a fact that good management, fair dealing and application to business will result in profit to the parties at interest. Failure rarely, if ever, comes to him who devotes himself conscientiously to his work, and to him who would succeed energy and perseverance are leading essentials. Mr. Nelson was born in Lee County, Miss., October 21, 1866, to William and Martha (Carter) Nelson (for a history of whom see the sketch of Jesse N. Nelson), but his education was received in Buford. He was reared in his father’s store, and after the latter’s death in 1885 he and his brothers, Jesse N., J. A. and W. B., then engaged in business together, and successfully carried on the business so ably inaugurated by their worthy sire, for a number of years. Then George Newton Nelson became the sole proprietor by purchase, and in addition to looking after his store carried on farming also, having a half interest in 500 acres of fine river bottom land. He is an enterprising young man, honest and industrious, and is in every way deserving of the success which has attended his efforts. He has held the position of notary public for four years, and has been postmaster of Buford a like length of time. He is a member of E. M. Tate Lodge No. 320,...

Biography of Joseph Tolover Hairston

One of the prominent citizens of Salina is Joseph Tolover Hairston, who was born on the 10th of March, 1862, at Saltillo, Mississippi. The Hairston family is of Scotch descent, its progenitor in this country having migrated from Scotland to Virginia at an early day. His sons, William, John and Peter, removed to South Carolina during the Revolutionary war, and William and John have many descendants in the southern states. The grandfather of Joseph Tolover was William Hairston, who died in his eightieth year. His son, Little Tolover Hairston, fought in the Civil war and was killed at Chickamauga at 4:30 o’clock in the afternoon of September 20, 1863, in the last charge on Snodgrass Hill. He was survived by his widow and two children. She was the daughter of Reuben Morgan, who removed from South Carolina to Mississippi in 1842 and was a large landowner and prominent agriculturist there. His demise occurred in 1860. Sometime after Mr. Hairston’s death, Mrs. Hairston was again married, becoming the wife of Edward G. Norris. Her demise occurred on the 17th of March, 1919. In the acquirement of an education, Joseph Tolover Hairston attended the public schools of Mississippi and in early life became a house and bridge carpenter. In 1888 he came to Oklahoma, then Indian Territory, and engaged in farming and stock raising until 1895, also doing some general contracting. In that year he came to his present location. For some time he followed agricultural pursuits here and then for seven years worked as a mechanic at the Cherokee Orphans Home at Salina under Wallace Ross, Joseph F. Thompson, Henry...

Planting, Clarence A. – Obituary

Clarence A. Planting, 76, of 3515 Pepperwood Dr., Boise, died Thursday, Feb. 6, 1986, in a Boise hospital of natural causes. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 10, at the Central Assembly Christian Life Center. Revs. Roy Strayer and Haskell Yadon will officiate. Burial will follow in Cloverdale Cemetery, under direction of the Alden-Waggoner Chapel. Mr. Planting, retired Ada County Clerk, was born Sept. 13, 1909, at his grandparents’ home in Astoria, Ore., a son of John W. and Mary Ring Planting whose home was at Helix, Ore. He attended schools in Pendleton, Ore., and graduated from Helix High School in 1928. After graduation he farmed with his father. He was active in evangelizing among the Finnish people in the Long Valley area of Idaho during the early 1930’s. In recent years, he conducted many funerals for his longtime Finnish friends. He moved to Boise in 1936 and attended Boise Business College. He later married Freada Fretwell on Jan 1, 1939 at Boise. He was a bookkeeper for a Boise dairy from 1939 to 1941. During World War II, he was a bookkeeper for the J. A. Terteling Construction Co. in several locations, including Oregon, South Dakota and Nebraska, then at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Following his mother’s death in 1943, he returned to Pendleton to farm with his father. In 1946 he moved to Tupelo, Miss., where he was a business manager for a theological school. He returned to Boise in 1949 where he spent the remainder of his life. Mr. Planting worked in county government for 25 years, and was Ada...

Planting, Freada Lucille – Obituary

Freada Lucille Planting, 86, of Boise, died Saturday, Dec. 14, 2002, in a Boise care center. Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Central Assembly Christian Life Center, 12000 Fairview Ave., with Pastors Loren Yadon Ted Buck and Marion Fretwell (Freada’s brother) officiating. Burial will follow at Cloverdale Cemetery. Services are under direction of the Alden-Waggoner Funeral Chapel, Boise. A viewing will be held today from 4 to 8:30 p.m. at the funeral home, with the family greeting friends from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Freada Lucille Planting was born April 7, 1916, at the family home at Roswell, Idaho, the eighth of 12 children born to William Lafayette and Fannie Ramsey Fretwell. She grew up in Roswell, graduating from high school in the class of 1935; then worked for Woolworth Co. in Caldwell and later in Boise. She attended Boise Bible College for a time, where she met her future husband. On Jan. 1, 1939, she married Clarence A. Planting in Boise. After they were married they lived in several locations due to Clarence’s employment including Hermiston, Ore., Ordinance Depot; Edgemont, S.D.; Alliance and Scottsbluff, Neb. They returned to Boise in 1942. They then moved to Oregon to operate the Planting family wheat ranch near Pendleton for three years. In 1946 they moved to Tupelo, Miss., where Freada taught in the PBI Bible College for a time, and had their first child. In 1949 they returned to Boise where they settled and had two more children. Freada was active in her church, teaching Sunday school, cooking and serving as the camp nurse for the...

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