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Slave Narrative of John W. H. Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: Marianna, Arkansas Age: 81 “I was born at Clinton Parish, Louisiana. I’m eighty-one years old. My parents and four children was sold and left six children behind. They kept the oldest children. In that way I was sold but never alone. Our family was divided and that brought grief to my parents. We was sold on a block at New Orleans. J.J. Gambol (Gamble?) in north Louisiana bought us. After freedom I seen all but one of our family. I don’t recollect why that was. “For three weeks steady after the surrender people was passing from the War and for two years off and on somebody come along going home. Some rode and some had a cane or stick walking. Mother was cooking a pot of shoulder meat. Them blue soldiers come by and et it up. I didn’t get any I know that. They cleaned us out. Father was born at Eastern Shore, Maryland. He was about half Indian. Mother’s mother was a squaw. I’m more Indian than Negro. Father said it was a white man’s war. He didn’t go to war. Mother was very dark. He spoke a broken tongue. “We worked on after freedom for the man we was owned by. We worked crops and patches. I didn’t see much difference then. I see a big change come out of it. We had to work. The work didn’t slacken a bit. I never owned land but my father owned eighty acres in Drew County. I don’t know what become of it. I worked on the railroad section, laid crossties, worked in...

Houses of the Quapaw Tribe

The Quapaw, the southernmost tribe of the Dhegiha group, occupied several villages west of the Mississippi, near the mouth of the Arkansas. When the closely allied tribes had removed from their ancient habitat in the upper valley of the Ohio, and had arrived at the mouth of that stream, the Quapaw are believed to have, turned southward while the others went northward. The name of the tribe, Quapaw, signifies “downstream people;” Omaha being translated “those going against the wind or current.” As a people they seem to have been known to the members of the De Soto expedition about 1541, probably occupying villages on or near the sites of the settlements visited by the French during the latter part of the next century. Père Marquette, while on his memorable journey down the Mississippi, in the year 1673, went as far as the mouth of the Arkansas, where he lingered a few days before returning northward on July 17. The villages of the Quapaw, designated the Arkansa, were reached, but the habitations were only briefly described: “Their cabins, which are long and wide, are made of bark; they sleep at the two extremities, which are raised about two feet from the ground. They keep their corn in large baskets, made of cane, or in gourds, as large as half barrels.” They used both wooden dishes and “plates of baked earth. Their cooking was done in large earthen pots, of their own make.”1 But the most interesting early account of the villages is contained in Joutel’s narrative of La Salle’s last expedition, when he attempted to reach the Illinois country overland...

Lee County, Arkansas Census

Lee County, Arkansas was formed from Crittenden, Monroe, Phillips, and St. Francis counties in 1873. 1880 Lee County, Arkansas Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Free 1880 Census Transcription Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1880 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Lee County, Arkansas Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Lee County, Arkansas Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Free 1900 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1900 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Lee County, Arkansas Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1910 Lee County, Census (images and index) $ Free 1910 Census Index Surnames: A-B Surnames: C-F Surnames: G-H Surnames: I-L Surnames: M-P Surnames: Q-S Surnames: T-Y Free 1910 Census Ed 66 pg 001a-003b pg 004a-006b pg 007a-009b pg 010a-014a Ed 67 pg 001a-005b pg 006a-009b pg 010a-013b pg 014a-017a pg 017b-021b pg 022a-027a Ed 68 pg 001a-005a pg 005b-010b Ed 69 pg 001a-004b pg 005a-009a Ed 70 pg 001a-004b pg 005a-008b pg 009a-012b pg 013a-016a pg 016b-019a Hosted at Census Guide 1910 U.S. Census Guide 1920 Lee County, Arkansas Census Free 1920 Census Form for your Research Free 1920 Census Images and Index (partial) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1920 Lee County, Census (images...

Lee County, Arkansas Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Lee County, Arkansas, GenWeb Archives Hopewell Cemetery Mars Hill Cemetery Hosted at Arkansas Cemeteries Higgins Cemetery Phillips Bayou Cemetery Salem Church Cemetery Unnamed Cemetery              ...

Biography of Capt. George M. Jones

Capt. Jones is the son of Henry F. and Mary (Waller) Jones, and was born in Shelby county, Tennessee, Oct. 19th, 1836.His father is still living there, aged eighty-one. His mother died in l856. George M. grew up on the farm, receiving his education at the common schools of the county where he lived. At the age of seventeen he went to Memphis, Tenn., and sold dry goods for the firm of Cossitt, Hill & Talmadge. He remained with them something over three years, receiving for his first year’s service, $75.00 and board; for the second, $100.00, and the third, $150.00. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in January, 1858, but went back to Tennessee after a short time. In the fall of the same, year he returned to Springfield and engaged in the general merchandising business, the firm being Miller, Jones & Co. He only remained here a year when be went to Dillon, Phelps county, Missouri, and embarked in the forwarding and commission business, which he carried on until the war broke out in 1861. In June of that year he enlisted as a private, in Capt. Dick Campbell’s company of Independence, Mo. State service, in the interest of the South. He was next transferred to Foster’s regiment, Company A, McBride’s division, C. S. A. He was shortly afterward made quartermaster, with the rank of captain. On account of ill health, he was honorably discharged at Jacksonport, Arkansas, in August, 1863. In 1864 he re-enlisted, and was for some time acting provost marshal in Chicot county, Arkansas. He next engaged with Col. Campbell in the recruiting service until...

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