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1850 Lawrence County, Mississippi Census

The 1850 census of Lawrence County, MS was extracted by Dennis Partridge in 2011. The extraction provides basic information such as the names, ages, sex, and occupation of each resident of the county. For space purposes and speed, I have chosen not to do a complete extraction, but may choose at a later date to add the full transcription. Every person enumerated in Lawrence County, however, is listed. For further verification of this census, researchers should view the original census records. For purposes of search, I have taken the liberty of adding the surname of each person. In the actual record, only the first person of each families surname per page was listed, while the remaining individuals of that family name were listed as ” for their surname. An extraction of a census is very much a work of art. The handwriting of Jonathan Keegan left many of the names indistinguishable, and often he spelled the name as it sounded, instead of as it actually occurred for the person in the records of the town, and in their family history. I have taken the liberty in my extraction of providing positive identity of each person enumerated – by this I mean I have used my knowledge of the residents of Lawrence County, MS at that time to identify each person, and used their proper spelling. LastGiveIAgeSCOccupation$State BowenWilliamH56mwMerchant2000NC BowenElizaK50fwSC BowenJohnB23mwGun Smith50SC BowenJacquesB21mwGun SmithSC BowenJamesL14mwSC BowenAG C12mwSC BowenHenryP9mwSC HurstWmW24mwShoemakerSC HurstHenrietta16fwSC HurstFrances18fwSC HurstElizaK1fwSC HurstThomasT19mwPrinterSC HurstSidneyB10mwSC WalkerT?50mwShoemakerMA StrongSamuel52mwFarmerNC StrongMary48fwNC StrongJohn22mwNC StrongJames21mwNC StrongMartha19fwNC StrongSamuelJr.18mwNC StrongME11fwNC StrongThomas7mwNC ElmoreSamuel5mwNC ElmoreMF3fwMS BattonHowe41mwFarmerNC BattonNancy33fwMS BattonRebecca10fwMS BattonIsabella9fwMS BattonNancyI6fwMS BattonHowell4mwMS BattonJohnC2mwMS KnappCarey51mwFarmer160KY KnappLucy53fwGA KnappWillis19mwMS KnappMartha17fwMS KnappThomas15mwMS KnappFanny13fwMS KnappWmC8mwMS WalkerH?38mwFarmerSC WalkerElizabeth34fwTN...

Slave Narrative of Charles Willis

Person Interviewed: Charles Willis Place of Birth: Lawrence County, Mississippi I found Mr. Willis seated on the front porch eating lemon drops out of a bag. He consumed the whole bag during the interview which lasted about 3 hours. He talked slowly and between his sucks on the lemon drops. He is hard of hearing and is losing his eyesight. He possesses a good sense of humor. Talked incessantly of matrimony and pretty gals. I was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi on the Sharp Plantation. My missus was name Sang Sharp and my mastah was name John Sharp. My mastah had 10 or 12 slaves and we done very well. Jining our place, the folks owned hundreds of slaves and jest beat them nearly to death. Even beat blood outta their back. I was whipped once by the white folks. That one time was by my mistress and don’t fergit she whipped me. I never remembah having shoes on only in winter time. Ever body wore them jest in winter time less they was able to buy some. We diden’ work Sadday afternoon and Sundays and doing of dis time off and in evenin’s off we would make money. My mother was a right yeller woman. She worked in the fields jest like I done. When she stood up, her hair fell on the floor. I tuck hair after her. My mother died 28 years ago at 92 years of age. My father was sold befo’ I could remember him. I never got no learning cause I jest diden have no chance. My mastah and mistress was old folks...

Slave Narrative of Jane Sutton

Person Interviewed: Jane Sutton Location: Gulfport, Mississippi Place of Birth: Simpson County MS Age: 84 Jane Sutton, ex-slave, is 84 years old. She is 5 feet, 6 inches tall and weighs 130 pounds. She is what the Negroes themselves call a “brown-skin.” “I was born in Simpson County, near old Westville, on a big farm what b’long to Marse Jack Berry. I was 12 years old when de surrender come, so my ole Mis’ say. Her name was ‘Mis Ailsey an’ all us cullud folks call her ‘Ole Mi’s. She an’ Old Marster had twelve chillun: Marthy, ‘Lizabeth, Flavilia, Mary, Jack, Bill, Denson, Pink, Tally, Thomas, Albert, and Frank. “My pappy’s name was Steve Hutchins. He b’long to de Hutchins what live down near Silver Creek. He jus’ come on Satu’d’y night an’ us don’ see much of ‘im. Us call him ‘dat man.’ Mammy tol’ us to be more ‘spectful to ‘im ’cause he was us daddy, but us aint care nothin’ ’bout ‘im. He aint never brung us no candy or nothin’. “My mammy was name Lucy Berry. She always go by de white folks name what she live wid. She aint never marry. She had fo’ boys an’ three girls. Dey was name Delia, Sarah, Ella, Nathan, Isom, Anderson, an’ Pleas. She work in de fiel’ an Old Marster say she’s de only woman on de place what could plow lak a man. “I ‘members my gran’ma, too. Us always call her ‘Granny.’ She say dey stole her back in Virginny an’ brung ‘er to Mississippi an’ sol’ her to Marse Berry. Her name was Hannah....

Slave Narrative of Robert R. Grinstead

Person Interviewed: Robert R. Grinstead Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Lawrence County, Mississippi Date of Birth: Feb. 17, 1857 Age: 80 I was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi, February 17, 1857. My father’s name is Elias Grinstead, a German, and my mother’s name is Ann Greenstead after that of her master. I am a son by my mother and her Master. I have four other half brother: William (Bill) oldest, Albert, Silas, and John. I was only eight years of age at freedom and for that reason I was too young to work and on account of being the son of my Master’s I received no hard treatment and did little or no work. Yet, I wore the same clothing as did the rest of the slaves: a shirt of lowell for summer and shirt and trousers for winter and no shoes. I could walk through a briar patch in my bare feet without sticking one in the bottom of my feet as they were so hard and resistant. I was the only child of my Master as he had no wife. When the war broke out he went to the war and left the plantation in charge of his overseer and his two sisters. As the overseers were hard for them to get along with they were oftener without an overseer as with one, and therefore they used one of the Negroes as overseer for the most of the time. Across the river was another large plantation and slave owner by the name of Master Wilson. We called him Master too, for he was a close...

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