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Biography of Rev. Henry Harmon Spalding

REV. H.H. SPALDING. – Rev. Henry Harmon Spalding was born at Prattsburg, New York, November 26, 1803. In early life he was left an orphan, and was brought up by strangers, who gave him almost no school advantages, so that at the age of twenty-one he began the rudiments of English grammar and arithmetic, could read so as to be understood and write after a copy. Having become a Christian, he united with the Presbyterian church of his native place in August, 1826; and between 1825 and 1828 he went to school so much that he was able to teach school. A part of the time he worked for his board and walked three miles to school. In 1828 he gave himself to missionary work, and entered Prattsburg Academy; and by 1831 he was able to enter the junior class – half way through – of Hamilton College, New York. On account of his poverty and the help he received from the education society, he was soon obliged to leave and go to the Western Reserve College, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1833. On October 12, 1833, he was married to Miss Eliza hart, of Trenton, new York, who was born at Berlin, Connecticut, being the daughter of Captain Levi and Martha hart, and who had been brought up in Ontario county, New York. In the fall of 1833 he entered lane Theological Seminary, where he remained two years, and in August, 1835, was ordained by the Bath Presbytery of New York, and soon after was appointed by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions to the...

Biography of John M. Silcott

Almost forty years have passed since John M. Silcott took up his residence in Idaho, and he is therefore one of the oldest and most widely known pioneers of the state. He came in the spring of 1860 to establish the government Indian agency at Lapwai, and has since been identified with the growth and development of this section. He is a Virginian, his birth having occurred in Loudoun County, of the Old Dominion, January 14, 1824. His French and Scotch ancestors were early settlers there, and during the Revolution and the war of 18 12 representatives of the family loyally served their country on the field of battle. William Silcott, the father of our subject, married Sarah Violet, a lady of Scotch ancestry, and about 1828 they removed with the family to Zanesville, Ohio, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He was liberal in his religious views, and his wife held the faith of the Presbyterian Church. His political support was given the Whig party and the principles advocated by Henry Clay. Only two children of the family of five are now living, the sister being Sarah T., who married Captain Abrams, of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Abrams now makes her home in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1845 the family removed to St. Louis, where both the parents died. Mr. Silcott received a common-school education in Zanesville, Ohio, and one of his school-mates was “Sunset” Cox, afterward distinguished in the United States congress. In his early life our subject learned the carpenter’s and boat-builder’s trades, which knowledge afterward proved of great practical benefit to him...

Biography of Perrin Beza Whitman

The name of Perrin Beza Whitman is indelibly inscribed on the pages of the history of the northwest, for throughout the period of its development he was an active factor in promoting its interests and is numbered among the honored pioneers who made possible its later-day progress and prosperity. The lot of the pioneer of the northwest has been a peculiarly hard one. The Indians, driven from their hunting grounds farther east, have cherished the resentment characteristic of the race, and have met as foes the brave band of white men who came to the western wilderness to reclaim the lands for purposes of civilization and to garner the riches of nature for themselves and families. Not only were the pioneers met by the hostility of the Indians, but vast stretches of sandy plains and almost impassable mountains separated them from the comforts and conveniences of the east, and their lot was one of danger, difficulty, hardship and toil. A courageous spirit, an unconquerable determination and steadfast purpose, these were the qualities demanded of the pioneers, and such characteristics enabled Mr. Whitman to meet conditions before which many another man would have quailed. He was the adopted son and nephew of the renowned Indian missionary, Dr. Marcus Whitman, who was massacred by the Indians in 1847. His birth occurred in Danville, Illinois, March 4, 1830. In 1840 he went to New York, and in 1843, when thirteen years of age, he crossed the plains to Oregon with his uncle and the first wagon train that made its way over the plains to the Columbia River. When Dr. Whitman was...

McFarland, Philip – Obituary

Wallowa, Wallowa County, Oregon Chief Philip Dies On His Native Sod Head of Nez Perce Indians Passes Away While Visiting in Wallowa County. Philip McFarland, leader of the Nez Perce Indians, died Tuesday afternoon at the Wallowa County Fair grounds. With about 30 members of his tribe he had come to his native hills to visit old scenes and enjoy the fair. His body will be buried on Captain John creek, on the Idaho side of Snake River, about 23 miles above Lewiston, beside his father and mother. All thru his life Chief Philip had been a frequent visitor in Wallowa County. He was here in the early summer with a party of Nez Perce Indians to locate the old Indian burial grounds which are set aside by the government as sacred to the Redmen. Two weeks ago he returned from his home at Lapwai, Idaho, and went to the head of Chesnimnus creek, where he remained until last Wednesday on Harry Huffman’s ranch. He had been affected with Bright’s disease for many years and other complications set in and he became very ill. He was brought to Enterprise on Thursday of last week and remained for two days at a hotel. Then the other Nez Perce Indians arrived and set up their tepees on the fair grounds and Philip joined them. A physician was called and the native Indian treatments also were applied but to no purpose. Philip was born in 1848 and so was 73 years of age, according to his own statement made recently. He was born on the Huffman ranch, and a year ago pointed...

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