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Narrative of Marie Le Roy and Barbara Leininger

The Narrative of Mary le Roy and Barbara Leininger. Who for four and a half years were captive among the Indians, and on the 6th May 1759 arrived happy in this city. From her own lips never written and promoted to the Press. This manuscript gives an account of the captivity and escape of these two girls, whose families lived on Penn’s Creek, in the present Union County, Pennsylvania. It also provides a lengthy list of names of other prisoners met by the two ladies in their captivity.

Philadelphia To Steubenville

Monday, Oct. 4, 1819.–Dr. Hall and myself left Philadelphia at 1 o’clock p. m. after taking an affectionate leave of friends and acquaintances. Fair and pleasant weather, and the roads very fine in consequence of a refreshing shower of rain which fell on the night previous to our setting out. After traveling twenty-two miles and passing some rich and well-cultivated farms we arrived at West Chester at 7 o’clock. West Chester contains about 600 inhabitants, several places of worship, a gaol, etc., etc. A man named Downey is confined in the gaol of this place for debt. He was once in affluence, but from misfortunes and some imprudence he became reduced in circumstances. During his confinement he determined to starve himself to death, and for seven days had refused nourishment of every description. Even the clergy waited on him and endeavored to dissuade him from his rash determination, offering him food of different kinds, but all without avail. He was able to stand. No doubt one or two more days will end his troubles. How long, O my country, will your cheeks continue to be crimsoned by the blush that must follow the plunging an innocent and unfortunate being, a debtor, in a dungeon, amongst murderers and cut-throats? Tuesday, Oct. 5.–Left West Chester at 7 o’clock a. m. Traveled a rough road. Passed some travelers on foot migrating to the west who were able to keep pace with us for a considerable distance. Breakfasted with an old Dutchman who, for unpolished manners and even a want of common politeness, surpassed in expectation even the wild men of Illinois. He...

Biography of John Quincy Smith

John Quincy Smith. The career of J. Quincy Smith, of Fredonia, had been an expression of well directed and diversified industry and in its development had invaded various fields of human activity, in each of which J. Q. Smith had won a full measure of material success and satisfying reputation. He had had experience in both professional and business labors, and while he is now retired from the activities of life, having approached the Psalmist’s three-score-and-ten years, is still an influence for good in his community and a citizen whose help and support continue to be factors for the development of the city’s interests. J. Q. Smith was born at Lebanon, Ohio, September 20, 1848, and is a son of Jacob H. and Martha (Steddom) Smith. Christian Smith, the grandfather of John Quincy Smith, was born in Germany, and was a young man when he decided to try his fortunes in business life in the United States. On coming to this country he located in Pennsylvania, and in that state spent his entire life residing at various places and being engaged in manufacturing operations. He not alone rose to a high position in business circles, but was also widely and favorably known in public matters and at one time was the candidate of the republican party for governor of Pennsylvania, but lost the election owing to political conditions in the country at that time. His death occurred at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in which the greater part of his life in America had been passed. Jacob H. Smith, father of John Q. Smith, was born in 1803, at Strassburg, Pennsylvania, and...

Biography of Francis C. Herr M. D.

Francis C. Herr, M. D. One of the most widely known physicians in Franklin County is Dr. Francis C. Herr, who graduated from one of the oldest medical colleges in the country forty years ago, and had been in active practice at Ottawa since 1884. Born at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, December 1, 1852, he is a son of Amos F. and Anna (Frantz) Herr, both of whom are natives of Lancaster County. This is a very old and prominent family of early colonial German ancestry. Doctor Herr is a descendant of Hans Herr, who represented a Suabian family of Germany, where the Herrs had a coat of arms and other insignia of rank. Hans Herr came to Pennsylvania in 1709. He was a man of wealth and acquired 10,000 acres of land near Lancaster, where he spent his years. He established a family which had lived for generations and his descendants have become scattered all over the United States. In these generations are found numerous ministers, physicians, civil engineers, lawyers and many who have reached prominence in the political life of the country. Doctor Herr’s grandfather, Francis Herr, was born in Lancaster County and spent his life there. The father, Amos F. Herr, was born in 1818, was a farmer and stock raiser, from which pursuit he gained wealth, and died in Lancaster County in 1905. He and his wife were active members of the Menonnite Church. His wife, who is still living, is a daughter of Christian Frantz, a native of Eden in Lancaster County. Members of the Frantz family were also active in politics and in the Mennonite...

Biography of John Brandt

John Brandt was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1828, and is of German descent, his great-grand parents having emigrated from Germany, and settled in Pennsylvania, in the early history of that State. His father, John Brandt, for several years was engaged in the manufacture of rifles for the United States Government at Lancaster, and was a man of great natural mechanical ability. When the first railroad in Pennsylvania, known as the Old State road, running from Philadelphia to Columbia, and now a part of the Pennsylvania railroad system, was completed, the managers secured a locomotive of English manufacture. This was in the infancy of railroad operations in America, and after repeated failures in putting this primitive locomotive in working order, Mr. Brandt was sent for and speedily accomplished the task. His quick perception of the mechanical principles involved, although. in an entirely new field of work, attracted considerable attention and he was soon after appointed master mechanic of the road, which at that time was operated by the State. He remained in this position some eight or ten years, and was then appointed to a similar position on the Cumberland Valley Railroad, and later as superintendent of the motor power and machinery of the New York & Erie Railroad. In 1851 was made superintendent of the New Jersey Locomotive Works, at Paterson, New Jersey, and in 1853 assisted in founding the Lancaster Locomotive Works, at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, becoming superintendent of the works. He served in this latter position for two rears, when he retired from active life. He was connected with railroading during the incipient stages of its...

Biography of Tobias Engle

Tobias Engle, one of the early settlers of Freeport, is a native of Lancaster, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he was born May 9, 1829. He is the son of Jacob and Nancy (Myers) Engle. Jacob Jingle was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. In early days he ran a clover huller, later. a grist mill, and afterward took charge of his father’s farm in Lancaster county, residing there until 1851 when he removed to Stephenson county, Illinois, locating in Freeport where he remained two years. Deciding to return to Pennsylvania they started eastward but stopped in Montgomery county, Ohio, where Mr. Engle purchased a farm on which he spent the remainder of his life. His wife was a native of Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. They had eleven children, as follows : Benjamin, who died in Kansas ; Tobias; Jacob, who resides in Montgomery county, Ohio, on the old homestead; Abram, who lives on part of the old farm in Montgomery county, Ohio ; Betsy, wife of Jacob Huntzbiger, both deceased; Annie, wife of Adam Hocker, a farmer in Montgomery county, Ohio; Leah, wife of Jacob Castle, of Montgomery county, a farmer; Martha married Eli Boyer who runs a boarding house in Dayton, Ohio, and three others deceased. Tobias Engle received a limited education in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he worked on his father’s farm until 1851, removing at that time with the family to Freeport, Illinois. Here he embarked in the hardware business in company with John Slope, who later sold his interest to Jacob Stibgen, who in turn sold to Henry Strohm. With these three partners he remained in business...

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