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Slave Narrative of Moses Smith

I was born in New Orleans, but don’t remember anything about that place for I was sold to Master Jack Dunn when a little boy and moved to Paris, Texas. Master Jack and his wife, Suda, owned four pretty big farms around Paris and he was kept busy all the time going around to each of them, with me going along sometimes on a horse beside him. He’d be gone for a week at a time, come home and get some home cooking, clean up and be gone again. There was twelve slave families on the farm where I lived and the overseers was three. More families on the other places, how many I don’t know, but the old master was well fixed with slaves and money, too. My father was Isom Smith. He lived on a different farm than mother and us children. Her name was Laura and my brother’s name was Max; my sister was Rochelle. We lived in a log cabin just like all the other houses on the farm. It was two rooms, one a kitchen, but they both had fireplaces made of mud, grass and sticks, and the biggest piece of furniture was the wooden bed put together with wooden pegs. Father worked out for extra money and every Saturday night he come over and give each of us children a nickel. That went for the old fashioned kind of horehound candy what we could get in town, or if the sweet tooth wasn’t craving for it, we’d get a little can of sardines. Before I got big enough to work in the fields...

Chisum Cemetery, Lamar County, Texas

On West Washington Street Copied by Dan Hembree in 1968 who noted that all stones were in bad shape and most illegible. CHISUM John [Simpson], b. 16 Aug. 1824, d. 22 Dec. 1881. Lucinda, b. 24 Oct. 1804, d. 31 Oct. 1837. Claiborne, b. 22 June 1807, d. 24 Oct....

Durham Cemetery, Lamar County, Texas

This abandoned cemetery is located about two miles west of Faught. DURHAM Hardric, b. 9 June 1902, d. 5 June 1910. Son of J. F. & L. B. Infant, b. & d. 18 June 1906. Son of J. F. & L. B. SIKES Robert, b. 27 Nov. 1832, d. 8 Feb. 1900. J. N., b. 4 Dec. 1883, d. 30 Jan. 1888. Son of B. & M. CULVER(P?)SON Mary, b. 30 Sept. 1845, d. 15 Mar. 1910. WELCH W. P., b. 8 Feb. 1890, d. 1 Mar....

Clark Cemetery, Lamar County, Texas

Located north of Tigertown on property known in the 1960’s as the Hutchinson place, the land grant map shows it to be on land originally granted to W. C. Clark. There are a number of broken and crumbled stones with names and dates destroyed. CLARK W. C., b. 8 Jan. 1790, d. 19 Oct....

Biography of Judge W. N. Evans

Judge W. N. Evans, of the Twentieth Judicial District of Missouri, makes his home in the northwestern part of West Plains, where he has a handsome residence on Garfield Avenue. He is a native of Owsley County, Kentucky, born September 1, 1849, and the son of W. N. and Elizabeth (Hurst) Evans. The grandfather, John Evans, was a native of Wales, who came to this country at an early day and settled in old Virginia. Later he moved to east Tennessee and there passed the remainder of his days. He had but three children, two sons and a daughter. The father of our subject was born in east Tennessee in 1824, and his early life was spent on a farm. There he married and resided until 1849, when he moved to Kentucky, where he was among the pioneers. He followed farming there and was one of the prominent men in the county. He held a number of offices in Owsley County. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the Tenth Kentucky, Confederate army, and served in the Virginia army. Mr. Evans participated in a number of prominent engagements and was taken a prisoner of war in the latter part of 1863, being confined in the Rock Island Prison, Illinois, where he soon after died. He was always a strong Democrat and a prominent and influential man in the section in which he lived. Of the nine children born to his marriage, seven are still living. Mrs. Evans is living near Marshfield, Webster County, Missouri, and is in the enjoyment of comparatively good health. Judge W. N. Evans...

Biographical Sketch of Mary A Donaldson

When Carrie E. Crowe was called away in January 1906, the place was rather reluctantly assumed but very acceptably filled by Mrs. Sarah L. Wallace of Fairhope, Alabama. After two months she also was called away. The place was then filled by Mary A. Donaldson of Paris, Texas. She had been an attendant at the first Oak Hill Normal, in 1905, and then became a missionary teacher at Grant. Attendance at the Normal led to her recognition, both at Grant and Oak Hill. After teaching several years she pursued another course of training at New Orleans and has become a professional...

Biography of Kelly Brown

Kelly Brown, whose ripened powers place him among the capable representatives of civil law practice in Muskogee and who is also numbered among the lawmakers of the state, having been a member of the fifth general assembly of Oklahoma, is descended from an old English family, several of the representatives thereof with the nobility. Having incurred the being connected with nobility incurred the displeasure of the reigning monarch, the original progenitors of the family in America were obliged to flee to the new world, this occurring about the time of the Revolutionary war, settlement being made by them in Virginia. One or more of the family made their escape by becoming stowaways on vessels crossing the Atlantic. From Virginia members of the family made their way into Kentucky and it was in that state that Allen K. Brown, father of Kelly Brown, was born and reared. He there married Eliza Lykins, also a native of Kentucky, and in support of their family he followed the occupation of farming and stock raising in Kentucky until about 1897, when he removed to Oklahoma, becoming a resident of Ardmore. Allen K. and Eliza (Lykins) Brown were parents of five sons and two daughters. These in addition to Kelly Brown are: Henry H., who is engaged in law, practice at Ardmore; John F., a farmer and stock raiser of Kentucky, residing in Lexington; William M., connected with the Ardmore lee, Light Power Company; Russell B., a member of the Ardmore bar; Mrs. W. H. Stacey of Cannel City, Kentucky; and Mrs. M. Lykins of Ardmore. The birth of Kelly Brown occurred at Caney,...

Biography of Patrick Cleburn Woodruff, M. D.

In the passing of Dr. Patrick Cleburn Woodruff the medical profession lost a representative member. For twelve years he resided in Stilwell and during that time endeared himself to every one in the community. A man of great charity, he served rich and poor alike and his sudden demise, on the 29th of December, 1914, came as a severe shock to his many friends. A native of Mississippi, Dr. Woodruff was born on the 31st of January, 1865, a son of T. P. and Elizabeth (Leatherwood) Woodruff, both natives of that state. In 1871 they removed to Paris, Texas, and resided there until 1898, when they located in Rogers, Arkansas. There the father engaged in the fruit growing business on a large scale and achieved gratifying success in that connection. They were among the representative and progressive citizens of Rogers, -where they lived until death. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff eight children were born, of whom three girls and three boys are living. Patrick Cleburn Woodruff, whose name initiates this review, was the third in order of birth. In the acquirement of an education Patrick Cleburn Woodruff attended the public schools of Paris, Texas, and upon determining to enter the medical profession, he enrolled as a student in the Louisville Medical College, from which institution he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1888. He then located at Mount Joy, Texas, where he established offices for the practice of his profession and remained six months, at the termination of which time he went to Roxton, practicing there until 1900. In that year he moved to...

Biography of Frank Lee

From the year which brought statehood to Oklahoma, Frank Lee has been a member of the Muskogee bar and is regarded as one of the strong and eminent representatives of the profession in this part of the state. He has engaged in the practice of law altogether for thirty-five years and his professional career has been marked by continuous progress and constantly developing power. Born in Stockwell, Indiana, December 9, 1864, he is a son of Captain Smith Lee, who served with the Boys in Blue in the Civil war, becoming a member of Company I, Eleventh Indiana Cavalry. After loyally aiding in the defense of the Union he filled various county offices in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, and later removed to Texas, where he conducted a fruit ranch. Frank Lee pursued his more specifically literary education in Stockwell College, near La Fayette, Indiana, and took up the study of law in Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, where he was graduated with the class of 1886. The day was indeed a Commencement Day for him the commencement of a professional career which has been characterized by thoroughness, by faithfulness to his clients’ interests and by continuous study and research, making him a strong advocate before the court and a safe counselor in regard to legal matters. He entered upon the general practice of law at Paris, Texas, and was afterward appointed assistant United States attorney at that place, the court there also having jurisdiction over parts of Oklahoma, then Indian Territory. He occupied the position for four years and in 1902, when the town of Hugo, Oklahoma, was founded, he...
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