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Slave Narrative of John Eubanks & Family

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Barren County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 6, 1836 Age: 98 Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Lake County-District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES JOHN EUBANKS & FAMILY Gary, Indiana Gary’s only surviving Civil War veteran was born a slave in Barren County, Kentucky, June 6, 1836. His father was a mulatto and a free negro. His mother was a slave on the Everrett plantation and his grandparents ware full-blooded African negroes. As a child he began work as soon as possible and was put to work hoeing and picking cotton and any other odd jobs that would keep him busy. He was one of a family of several children, and is the sole survivor, a brother living in Indianapolis, having died there in 1935. Following the custom of the south, when the children of the Everrett family grew up, they married and slaves were given them for wedding presents. John was given to a daughter who married a man of the name of Eubanks, hence his name, John Eubanks. John was one of the more fortunate slaves in that his mistress and master were kind and they were in a state divided on the question of slavery. They favored the north. The rest of the children were given to other members of the Everrett family upon their marriage or sold down the river and never saw one another until after the close of the Civil War. Shortly after the beginning of the Civil War, when the north seemed to be losing, someone conceived the idea...

Slave Narrative of Rev. Wamble

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: Rev. Wamble Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Monroe County, Mississippi, Date of Birth: 1859 Place of Residence: 1827 Madison Street, Gary, Indiana Occupation: Wagon-maker Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Porter County-District #1 Valparaiso, Indiana EX-SLAVES REV. WAMBLE 1827 Madison Street Gary, Indiana [TR: above ‘Wamble’ in handwriting is ‘Womble’] Rev. Wamble was born a slave in Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1859. The Westbrook family owned many slaves in charge of over-seers who managed the farm, on which there were usually two hundred or more slaves. One of the Westbrook daughters married a Mr. Wamble, a wagon-maker. The Westbrook family gave the newly-weds two slaves, as did the Wamble family. One of the two slaves coming from the Westbrook family was Rev. Wamble’s grandfather. It seems that the slaves took the name of their master, hence Rev. Wamble’s grandfather was named Wamble. Families owning only a few slaves and in moderate circumstances usually treated their slaves kindly since like a farmer with only a few horses, it was to their best interest to see that their slaves were well provided for. The slaves were valuable, and there was no funds to buy others, whereas the large slave owners were wealthy and one slave more or less made little difference. The Reverend’s father and his brothers were children of original African slaves and were of the same age as the Wamble boys and grew up together. The Reverend’s grandfather was manager of the farm and the three Wamble boys worked under him the same as the slaves. Mr. Wamble never permitted any of...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Hockaday

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: Mrs. Hockaday Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Residence: 2591 Madison Street, Gary, Indiana Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Porter County-District #1 Valparaiso, Indiana EX-SLAVES MRS. HOCKADAY 2581 Madison Street Gary, Indiana Mrs. Hockaday is the daughter of an ex-slave and like so many others does not care to discuss the dark side of slavery and the cruel treatment that some of them received. After the Civil War the slaves who for the most part were unskilled and ignorant, found it very difficult to adjust themselves to their new life as free persons. Formerly, they lived on the land of their masters and although compelled to work long hours, their food and lodging were provided for them. After their emancipation, this life was changed. They were free and had to think for themselves and make a living. Times for the negro then was much the same as during the depression. Several of the slaves started out to secure jobs, but all found it difficult to adjust themselves to the new life and difficult to secure employment. Many came back to their old owners and many were afraid to leave and continued on much as before. The north set up stores or relief stations where the negro who was unable to secure employment could obtain food and shelter. Mrs. Hockaday says it was the same as conditions have been the last few years. About all the negro was skilled at was servant work and when they came north, they encountered the same difficulties as several of the colored folks who, driven by the terrible...

Slave Narrative of John Eubanks

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Age: 98 Place of Residence: 2713 Harrison Boulevard, Gary, Indiana Archie Koritz, Field Worker 816 Mound Street, Valparaiso, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project Lake County, District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES INTERVIEW WITH JOHN EUBANKS, EX-SLAVE John Eubanks, Gary’s only negro Civil War survivor has lived to see the ninety-eighth anniversary of his birth and despite his advanced age, recalls with surprising clarity many interesting and sad events of his boyhood days when a slave on the Everett plantation. He was born in Glasgow, Barron County, Kentucky, June 6, 1839, one of seven children of a chattel of the Everett family. The old man retains most of his faculties, but bears the mark of his extreme age in an obvious feebleness and failing sight and memory. He is physically large, says he once was a husky, weighing over two hundred pounds, bears no scars or deformities and despite the hardships and deprivations of his youth, presents a kindly and tolerant attitude. “I remembah well, us young uns on the Everett plantation,” he relates, “I worked since I can remembah, hoein’, pickin’ cotton and othah chohs ’round the fahm. We didden have much clothes, nevah no undahweah, no shoes, old ovahalls and a tattahed shirt, wintah and summah. Come de wintah, it be so cold mah feet weah plumb numb mos’ o’ de time and manya time-when we git a chanct-we druve the hogs from outin the bogs an’ put ouah feet in the wahmed wet mud. They was cracked and the skin on the bottoms and in de toes weah cracked...

Biography of Owen Jason Wood

Owen Jason Wood is a lawyer by profession, had been a resident of Topeka since 1890, and for many years had been assistant solicitor for Kansas of The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. He gained his first knowledge of life in the world in the northwest corner of Indiana, in Lake County. He was born at Crown Point, the county seat, August 10, 1853. His parents were Martin and Susan G. (Taylor) Wood. His father owned a farm and represented one of the early pioneer families of Northwestern Indians and he was a lawyer by profession, and was in practice at Crown Point from 1848 until 1892. He died in 1892 und his widow is now Living at Topeka with her son Owen J. in her ninetieth year. Martin Wood was considered a man of prominence in Lake County, Indiana, and for two terms represented the county in the Indiana Legislature. His earlier years Owen Jason Wood spent on a farm. That environment was a source of good health and of many associations which he had always prized, but the knowledge of farming gained then be had never put to further use. He attended the graded schools in Crown Point, read law in his father’s office, was admitted to the bar and also attended the law department of Indiana State University. He was graduated in June, 1876, with the degree LL. B. After a brief practice in his native state, Mr. Wood removed to Minnesota, locating at Montevideo, where he practiced law until February, 1886. While in Minnesota he was twice elected county attorney of Chippewa County....

Biography of Fred L. Lowman

Fred L. Lowman. One of the most capable educators of Champaign County is the present superintendent of the Fisher public schools, Fred L. Lowman. He is a man of varied and versatile gifts and accomplishments, and well fitted for his place in the educational system of this leading Illinois County. He has come in close touch with the facts and problems of life, is a man of broad sympathies and enthusiasm and is in every way qualified to direct and administer a school and have charge of the training of the men and women of the next generation. Mr. Lowman was born in Champaign County, February 8, 1885. He is the oldest of the seven children, five sons and two daughters, of John Lewis and Minerva (O’Bryan) Lowman. Five children are still living. His father was born in Douglas County, Illinois, October 20, 1858, was educated in the common schools, and is still living. His people came out of Ohio and settled near Cook’s Mill in Douglas County in early days. John L. Lowman is a Republican and cast his first presidential vote for James A. Garfield, the president who began life on the towpath of a canal in Ohio. Mrs. John L. Lowman was born in Champaign County, February 8, 1855. She is still living, as is her aged mother, now eighty-five. A coincidence is the fact that Mr. Lowman, his mother and grandmother were all born on February 8th. Mr. Fred L. Lowman, as the oldest in a large family, and his parents being people of moderate circumstances, he had to take the responsibilities of life at...

Biography of William J. Stewart, M. D.

William J. Stewart, M. D. His first years in. Kansas Doctor Stewart spent in the role of a practical farmer, but since finishing his medical course had been in successful practice as a physician and surgeon at Summerfield, Marshall County. Doctor Stewart is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His grandfather, William Stewart, was born at Strabane, Ireland, in 1808, and married Nancy Wilson, a native of the same place, born in 1806. Both of them were of Scotch-Irish families. They married in the old country and all their children were born in Ireland as follows: Charles, who became a farmer and died in Colorado; Belle, who lives at Laroy, Indiana, widow of James McKnight, a Union soldier and a farmer; Jennie, wife of James Carson, now postmaster at Hebron, Indians; and John Stewart. William Stewart and wife brought their family to America and became pioner settlers in Lake County in the extreme northwest corner of Indiana in 1845. William Stewart followed farming and developed a tract of land in that wild section of country and he died at Crown Point, Indiana, in 1883 and his widow survived him and died in that city in 1902. John Stewart, father of Doctor Stewart, was born in Strabane, Ireland, in 1843, and was two years of age when his parents settled near Crown Point, Indiana. He grew up on the old homestead, and at the age of nineteen, in 1862, enlisted for service in the Union army in the Ninth Indiana Infantry. He saw a great deal of active and strennous service in the Army of the Cumberland. He was at the battles of...

Biographical Sketch of W. P. Jacobs

Although death claimed W. P. Jacobs in 1906, a year after his arrival in Bartlesville, he had already gained a well established position in business circles here, his enterprise and integrity winning for him the respect and confidence of all with whom he was brought into contact. He was born in Hammond, Indiana, in 1866, and acquired his education in Danville College, after which he became connected with the lumber business at Toledo, Ohio. From there he went to Findlay, Ohio, where he was identified with the same line of activity, and he subsequently removed to Lima, that state, where he became interested in the manufacture of torpedoes; conducting his enterprise under the name of the Producers Explosive Company, of which he was president. Subsequently the Dupont Powder Company bought out his interests and in 1905 he came to Bartlesville and purchased a drug store, also investing in oil property. He died in 1906 of heart failure. He was an astute, farsighted business man whose plans were carefully formulated and promptly executed, and opportunity was ever to him a call to action. In 1905, at Jamestown, New York, Mr. Jacobs was united in marriage to Mrs. Carolina (Raymond) Bush of Corry, Pennsylvania, a niece of the late Murray Raymond, who was president of the Raymond Manufacturing Company of Corry. Mr. Jacobs passe. away at the age of forty years, when still in the prime of life, and his demise was deeply regretted not only by his immediate family but by all who had the honor of his closer acquaintance. He was a man of sterling worth, capable and enterprising...

Biography of Oliver Morton Williams

Oliver Morton Williams, one of the younger citizens of Kansas, has played his part efficiently as a teacher and business man, and is now manager and part owner of the Coffeyville Business College. This college is an institution noted for its thorough work in training young men and women for responsible positions in commercial affairs. A native of Kansas, Mr. Williams was born at Oak Valley, October 24, 1887. Several generations back his ancestors were living in Wales, and after coming to the United States settled perhaps first in New York, and afterwards went to Maryland. The great-great-grandfather’s name was Timothy Williams, and he was of Welsh descent. He was a Revolutionary soldier and also had three sons in the Continental army. The three sons were captured by the British and taken to Montreal, Canada, to the British prison. One of them was a physician, and he was soon taken out of the prison. The reason for this removal was not known by the other brothers but they supposed for service in the British hospitals, and they never heard of him afterward. The other two were kept in the prison for three years and three months, then were released and came back home. Great-grandfather Benjamin Williams was born in Pennsylvania about 1770. He was too small to serve as a soldier in the time of the Revolution, but he could mold bullets and watch port-holes while the soldiers rested. He was also captured by the British and Indians. An Indian took him and a little girl about his size to keep with the tribe, but a British officer, not...

Herman, Richard Louis “Dick” – Obituary

Richard Louis “Dick” Herman, 61, of Baker City, died peacefully on May 22, 2005, at his home with his family at his side. His funeral will be Wednesday at 2 p.m. at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Pastor Jon Privett of the First Nazarene Church will officiate. He will be buried at Mount Hope Cemetery next to his daughter, Dr. Suzanne Farebrother. Visitations will be today until 8 p.m. at Gray’s West & Co. Dick was born Dec. 13, 1943, at East Chicago, Ind. He was baptized and confirmed at St. John Lutheran Church in Calumet City, Ill. He was united in marriage to Nancy Lang at the same church on Aug. 4, 1962. They were elementary school sweethearts who met at Lincoln Elementary School in Calumet City. Dick was a graduate of Thornton Fractional North High School and went on to college at the University of Illinois in Urbana, Ill. He worked at various companies such as: Simmons Co., International Paper Inc., Chromaly Electronics, Motorola, S&R Industries, and IBM, where he worked as a mechanical engineer/scientist. While at IBM he received five U.S. patents, wrote 12 technical publications and received many outstanding achievement awards. He retired from IBM in 1994 and started his own engineering business. He also worked in Baker City on architectural design plans on commercial and private buildings including: OTEC, Pioneer Bank, Stump Dodger Station, and several homes. His favorite sport was fishing. Dick is survived by his wife, Nancy; his daughters, Sheri and Dannielle; his son, Gregory; his brothers, Leslie and Robert; his sister, Janice; his brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law; and...
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