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Biographical Sketch of Atlantic A. Moore

Atlantic A. Moore, during the twenty-four years that he resided in Kansas, assisted in the founding of Marion County and became a familiar and respected figure in both houses of the State Legislature. He was familiarly known as “Lank” Moore. A native of Ohio, he came to Wankegan, Illinois, as a boy, living there and in Wisconsin until he “entered the government service” with his brother, as a driver of ambulances from Kansas City to Santa Fe. Not caring to settle in that part of the Southwest, they started on their return in the fall of the same year. At Cottonwood Crossing (now Durham, Kansas) on the Santa Fe trail, a man named Smith had built a small log cabin and was running a trading post, selling whisky, canned goods and other provisions to passing trains. The Moore brothers bought out the place, and later took up a claim at what became known as Moore’s Ranch. In the spring of 1861 a postoffice was established there, with A. A. Moore as postmaster. That year the Town of Marion Center was also laid out, and there Mr. Moore built a store and otherwiso identified himself with the growth of the place. Upon the organization of Marion County in 1865 he was elected county treasuror and representative; was returned to the Legislature in 1867; served in the State Senate in 1868, and was again a member of the House of Representatives in 1871. In 1862 he had been married to Nancy O. Waterman, and in the following year was born Ira A. Moore, the first native white child of Marion County....

Biography of Walter C. G. Kirchner, M. D.

Washington University is the alma mater of many of the ablest physicians and surgeons of St. Louis, men who have enjoyed the thorough training of that school and in their profession have won advancement by reason of their thorough ability and skill. In the field of surgery Dr. Walter C. G. Kirchner is well known and Missouri is therefore proud to number him among her native sons. He was born in St. Charles, July 14, 1875, and is a son of Dr. Henry A. Kirchner, who was a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and was of German descent, the grandfather being Dr. Henry C. A. Kirchner, who became the founder of the American branch of the family. He was not only a physician and surgeon but was also a graduate in chemistry and pharmacy and was one of the founders of the St. Louis College of Pharmacy. Later he completed his medical course in the old St. Louis Medical College and here resided to the time of his death, actively engaged in practice for many years, passing away in 1902, at the advanced age of eighty-seven. His son, Dr. Henry A. Kirchner, was reared and educated in St. Louis and was graduated from the St. Louis Medical College, after which he devoted his time to professional duties until death ended his labors. He began practice in St. Charles, where he remained until 1881 and then returned to St. Louis, where he successfully followed his profession throughout his remaining days. He was born in 1850 and had therefore attained the age of sixty-one years when called to his final rest in...

Biographical Sketch of Nathan Frank Frazier, Jr.

Nathan Frank Frazier, Jr., the younger son of Nathan F. and Elmma (Crook) Frazier, and vice president of the Citizens State Bank of El Dorado, was born at El Dorado March 13, 1882. He was reared in his native town, where he received his preparatory education in the public schools, following which he entered Lake Forest Academy at Lake Forest, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 1903. After graduation he was employed at Kansas City, Missouri, for a short time, and then returned to El Dorado, where he became associated with his father and assisted the elder man in bandling his extensive business interests. In 1905, together with his father and his brother, Ray E., he acquired large oil properties in Southeastern Kansas and Oklahoma and organized several oil companies, with headquarters at Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Mr. Frazier becarne an officer and director in these companies, and still retains his holdings, which have increased in value and have become very profitable. He is active vice presldent and one of the largest stockholders in the Citizens State Bank of El Dorado, and is active in the conduct of the daily affairs of the institntion, had also large holdings in farm and grazing lands in Kansas and Oklahoma, and owned and operates a farm eomprising 1,000 acres a few miles south of Towanda. This farm includes in its acreage some of the richest bottom land in the state, equipped with the most modern improvements, and, in fact, is one of the most model farms of the state. On September 28, 1905, Mr. Frazier was united in marriage with Miss Zona...

Biography of Charles W. Kent

Charles W. Kent of Coffeyville is a veteran newspaper man of Kansas. His has been an interesting past. He served as a boy soldier in the Union army, and several of his brothers also bore arms for the Stars and Stripes. In a half century of active experience he has largely been identified with the newspaper business, and has been in Southern Kansas about a quarter of a century. On July 7, 1893, he established and brought out the Gate City Independent, the forerunner of the present weekly Independent. For a number of years Coffeyville was familiarly known as the Gate City, since it was in fact the gateway leading from Kansas into old Indian Territory. Since its establishment Mr. Kent has been sole owner and editor of this old and influential newspaper. He now has a modern plant and equipment at 208 East Ninth Street. He also owns the building from which the paper is published. Starting out with a weekly issue, six months later Mr. Kent changed it to a semi-weekly paper, and six months later still he made it a dally and semi-weekly. Since the Spanish-American war the daily has been discontinued and in 1908 he abandoned the semi-weekly edition. It is now a weekly, and this change was made largely to adapt the paper to the needs and demands of the farming community surrounding Coffeyville. The Independent has a splendid country circulation, and goes to patrons on the farms and in the nearby towns all over Southeastern Kansas and Northern Oklahoma. It is essentially a home newspaper and specializes in news of the farms and...

Biography of Anson S. Cooke, Hon.

Hon. Anson S. Cooke. A resident of Kansas during a period of forty-five years, a pioneer of the prairies of Mitchell County, and for twelve years a member of the State Senate, Hon. Anson S. Cooke is well and favorably known in various parts of the commonwealth, and particularly so at Topeka where he now is living in retirement. During his long and useful career he has risen from poverty to affluence and from obscurity to prominence, and while engaged steadfastly and successfully in the promotion of his personal interests has also contributed to the welfare of the state which has so long been his home. Senator Cooke was born August 13, 1849, in Lake County, Illinois, a son of Daniel G. Cooke. The family is of Quaker stock, with all the sterling characteristics of that creed, and originated in this country in New England, from whence came David Cooke, the grandfather of Anson S. David Cooke was an early settler of Oneida County, New York, arriving there at a time when the country was still new and wild game abundant, the bears being so numerous that it was almost impossible to raise livestock with any degree of success. Senator Cooke says that he has frequently heard his grandfather tell of driving them out of his hog pen. Daniel G. Cooke, father of the senator, was born in 1822, in Oneida County, New York, and was married in 1845 to Miss Mary Lavina Simonds, a daughter of D. J. Simonds. Mr. Simonds was for some years a well-known farmer of Lake County, Illinois, but later moved to Wisconsin, after...

Biography of A. J. Whitmore

A. J. Whitmore is an old timer in Kansas, having been identified with this state most of the time since 1885. He has been well known both in business and in public affairs, and for a number of years has lived in Tepeka. He was born in Lake County, Illinois, in 1859. His father William D. Whitmore was born in Seneca County, Ohio, in 1836, a son of James Whitmore, who was born in Lockport, New York, in 1794. James Whitmore was an early settler in Ohio, and in 1837 took his family to Illinois and secured a homestead in the extreme northeastern part of the state, not far from Chicago. He died on his old homestead in 1877 at the advanced age of eighty-three. James Whitmore married Martha McNitt. They became the parents of four sons and one daughter. William D. Whitmore at the age of twenty-one married Ann C. Bangs of Lake County, Illinois, a daughter of Herman Bangs. She was a lineal descendant from Edward Bangs who came to Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1623. A son of Edward was Arthur, who in turn became the father of James, and the latter the father of Herman Bangs, the father of Mrs. William D. Whitmore. William D. Whitmore joined the Union army very early in the Civil war. He enlisted in Company B of the Ninety-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry under Col. Thomas E. Champion. His regiment was attached to General Grainger’s Reserve Corps. His regiment was also in active service with General Thomas and at the Battle of Kenesaw Mountain near Atlanta, Georgia, on June 20, 1864, William D....

Biographical Sketch of James Hotchkiss Rogers

Rogers, James Hotchkiss; pianist, organist; born, Fair Haven, Conn., Feb. 7, 1857; son of Martin L. and Harriet (Hotchkiss` Rogers; educated, Lake Forest, Ill.; studied music, Berlin and Paris, 1875-1880; married Alice Abigail Hall, of Indianapolis, Oct. 20, 1891; composer of about 150 compositions, including songs, piano pieces, anthems and part songs; two cantatas: “The Man of Nazareth”; “The New Life”; as well as part songs and music for organ and...

Biography of George M. Gray, M. D.

George M. Gray, M. D. There is hardly a more eminent physician and surgeon in the State of Kansas than Dr. George M. Gray, of Kansas City, Kansas. He is ex-president of the Kansas State Medical Society, a member of the American Medical Association, and has been accorded the honor of a fellowship in the American College of Surgeons. In 1915 Governor Capper appointed him a member of the State Board of Medical Registration and Examination for Kansas and he is now president of the board. Doctor Gray has been in active practice at Kansas City, Kansas, for more than thirty-five years, and for the greater part of that time has been head of the staff of St. Margaret’s Hospital. His attainments and the service he has rendered in his profession are not the only distinctions to be associated with his name. Doctor Gray is properly considered as the father of the park and boulevard system of Kansas City, Kansas. For years he has worked and planned for an adequate system of driveways and parks, and many of the ideas of the project now being put into execution originated in his mind. In March, 1907, the Kansas Legislature passed the law giving Kansas City, Kansas, authority to organize a park board, and permitting the board to levy special taxes for a park and boulevard system. A test was made of the law, and it was declared constitutional by the supreme court. When the law went into effect Mr. Gray was serving as mayor of Kansas City, Kansas, and that position gave him the authority to appoint the first park...

Biography of H. L. Anderson

The rapid development of northeastern Oklahoma, which is one of the richest oil fields in the country, has created a large and growing demand for competent men and women to handle the office end of this important industry and the Bartlesville Business College, of which H. L. Anderson is manager, is well equipped to meet this situation, for its graduates have gone forth into the business world well fitted to handle important duties, their developed powers serving as a foundation for growing success. Mr. Anderson is a native of Illinois. He was born in Vernon, August 14, 1890, and after completing his high school course he entered the State Normal School, from which he was graduated in 1914. For a year thereafter he taught school in Illinois and then came to Oklahoma, where he continued his educational work, serving for two years as principal of the high school at Oktaha. Following the entrance of the United States into the World war, he joined the service, becoming a corporal in the Medical Corps, and for seven months was stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Georgia. After his discharge he was made manager of the Bartlesville Business College, of which S. Maxwell Smith is President, while E. A. Guise acts as general manager. They also control the Tulsa and Sapulpa business colleges and are experienced school men who thoroughly understand the practical as well as the theoretical side of business life. The Bartlesville Business College is the only commercial school in the town and gives to its students the training the public is willing to pay for, teaching those subjects which fit men...

Biography of James A. Burge

James A. Burge. The oldest citizen of Fredonia, in point of residence, James A. Burge had watched and participated in the progress and development of this thriving city for forty-seven years, during forty-three of which he was identified with enterprises that contributed materially to the city’s prestige. From 1879 until his retirement, in 1912, he was connected with the Western Union Telegraph Company, first as messenger and later as manager, and the many friendships which he made while acting in these capacities have remained with him during the passing of the years. Mr. Burge was born in Lake County, Illinois, January 17, 1847, and is a son of James and Sarah (Chittenden) Burge. James Burge was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1812, and accompanied his six brothers and his parents to America when a lad, the family first settling in Ontario, Canada. When still a young man James Burge removed to Lake County, Illinois, where he was married, and settled on a farm forty miles northwest of Chicago, at a time when the present Illinois metropolis had only one log hotel. Mr. Burge was a farmer all his life and was successful in his operations, accumulating two properties aggregating 300 acres. He was first a whig and later a republican, and while he was a man of some consequence in his community did not seek office. His death occurred in 1896. Mr. Burge married Sarah Chittenden, who was a member of an old New England family, and a daughter of Myron Chittenden, of Vermont, a soldier of the War of 1812, who secured a grant of land in Lake...
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