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North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their evidences upon the western (in dependent of all written history) that they have likewise possessed this continent during unknown ages of the past. The artificial mounds, fortifications, lakes and ponds with their original names and those of rivers, creeks, mountains,...

Biography of Charles R. Freeman

Since 1902 Charles R. Freeman has been practicing law in Checotah, and he is numbered among the representative members of the legal profession in the state. He was born in Clay county, Mississippi, on the 8th of November, 1875, a son of John P. and Anna (Lyon) Freeman, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Mississippi. For some time the father followed agricultural pursuits in his native state and upon the outbreak of the Civil war continued to reside there until the last year of the war, when he enlisted for active service. At the close of the war he went to Mississippi where he bought some land and previous to his death he owned several plantations. His demise occurred in February, 1902. Mrs. Freeman died in May, 1883. Charles R. Freeman received his early education in the common schools of Clay county, Mississippi, and later enrolled in the Iuka Normal Institute at Iuka, that state, graduating from that institution in 1898, with the A. B. degree. Subsequently, determining upon a legal career, he entered the University of Mississippi at Oxford and he received his LL. B. degree in 1901. For the following year he practiced in Starkville, Mississippi, and in October, 1902, came to Checotah. He has built up an extensive and lucrative practice and handles much important litigation before the courts. He has ever remained a student of his profession and has one of the largest law libraries in the state. Outside of his practice Mr. Freeman has other interests being a stockholder and director in the Peoples National Bank of Checotah and...

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