Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Yahuskin Tribe

Yahuskin Indians. A Shoshonean band which prior to 1864 roved and hunted with the Walpapi about the shores of Goose, Silver, Warner, and Harney Lakes, Oregon, and temporarily in Surprise Valley and Klamath Marsh, where they gathered wokas for food. They came specially into notice in 1864, on Oct. 14 of which year they became party to the treaty of Klamath Lake by which their territory was ceded to the United States and they were placed on Klamath Reservation, established at that time. With the Walpapi and a few Paiute who had joined them, the Yahuskin were assigned lands in the southern part of the reservation, on Sprague river about Yainax, where the have since resided, although through intermarriage with other Indians on the reservation their tribal identity became lost by 1898, since which time they have been officially designated as Paiute. Gatschet, who visited them about 1884, says they were then engaged in agriculture, lived in willow lodges and log houses, and were gradually abandoning their roaming proclivities. The Yahuskin have always been officially enumerated with the Walpapi, the aggregate population varying between 1877 and 1891 from 135 to 166 persons. In 1909 they were reported at...

Biography of Leroy S. Dyar

Among the pioneers of Ontario and representative men of that beautiful colony, mention should be made of Leroy S. Dyar, who was born in Franklin County, Maine, in 1833. His father was Colonel Joseph Dyar, a well-known agriculturist of that county. His mother was Mary S. Gay. Both of his parents were natives of that State. Mr. Dyar was reared and schooled in his native place, closing his studies in the high school and academy. He was reared as a farmer. In 1858 he decided to try his fortune on the Pacific coast, and came by steamer to San Francisco. After a short stay in that city he proceeded to Yuba river and engaged in mining until the next year. He then located in Salem, Oregon, and was employed in farming and teaching until 1863, when he established himself in mercantile pursuits in Salem, under the firm name of N. O. Parrish & Co. In 1864 he was appointed Postmaster at Salem, and held that office until 1868. He was engaged in various enterprises in Salem until 1871, when he accepted a position in the Indian Department as superintendent of schools of mechanical and agricultural instruction, and was stationed on the Yakima Indian Reservation until the fall of that year, when he went to the Grand Ronde Reservation as commissary in charge. In the spring of 1872 he was appointed Indian agent of the Klamath Reservation, located at Klamath Lake. It was this reservation that the notorious Modoc Chief, Captain Jack, and his band had left two years before and were then at war with the United States troops...

Modoc Tribe

Modoc Indians (from Móatokni, ‘southerners’). A Lutuamian tribe, forming the southern division of that stock, in south west Oregon. The Modoc language is practically the same as the Klamath, the dialectic differences being extremely slight. This linguistic identity would indicate that the local separation of the two tribes must have been comparatively recent and has never been complete. The former habitat of the Modoc included Little Klamath Lake, Modoc Lake, Tule Lake, Lost River Valley, and Clear Lake, and extended at times as far east as Goose Lake. The most important bands of the tribe were at Little Klamath Lake, Tule Lake, and in the Valley of Lost River. Frequent conflicts with white immigrants, in which both sides were guilty of many atrocities, have given the tribe an unfortunate reputation. In 1864 the Modoc joined the Klamath in ceding their territory to the United States and removed to Klamath Reservation. They seem never to have been contented, however, and made persistent efforts to return and occupy their former lands on Lost River and its vicinity. In 1870 a prominent chief named Kintpuash, commonly known to history as Captain Jack, led the more turbulent portion of the tribe back to the California border and obstinately refused to return to the reservation. The first attempt to bring back the runaways by force brought on the Modoc War of 1872-73. After some struggles Kintpuash and his band retreated to the lava-beds on the California frontier, and from January to April, 1873, successfully resisted the attempts of the troops to dislodge them. The progress of the war had been slow until April of...

Klamath Tribe

Klamath Indians (possibly from máklaks, the Lutuami term for `Indians,’ `people,’ ‘community’; lit. ‘the encamped’). A Lutuamian tribe in south west Oregon. They call themselves Eukshikni or Auksni,’ people of the lake,’ referring to the fact that their principal seats were on Upper Klamath lake. There were also important settlements on Williamson and Sprague Rivers. The Klamath are a hardy people and, unlike the other branch of the family, the Modoc, have always lived at peace with the whites. In 1864 they joined the Modoc in ceding the greater part of their territory to the United States and settled on Klamath Reservation, where they numbered 755 in 1905, including, however, many former slaves and members of other tribes who have become more or less assimilated with the Klamath since the establishment of the reservation. Slavery was a notable institution among the Klamath, and previous to the treaty of 1864 they accompanied the Modoc every year on a raid against the Achomawi of Pit River, California, for the capture of women and children whom they retained as slaves or bartered with the Chinook at The Dalles. The Klamath took no part in the Modoc War of 1872-73, and it is said that their contemptuous treatment of the Modoc was a main cause of the dissatisfaction of the latter with their homes on the reservation which led to their return to Lost river and thus to the war. The following are the Klamath settlements and divisions so far as known: Awalokaksaksi Kohashti Kulshtgeush Kuyamskaiks Nilakshi Shuyakeksh Yaaga Yulalona For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on...

Pin It on Pinterest