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Biography of William Clinton Bardo

William Clinton Bardo, vice president of the Security National Bank of Arkansas City, was a pioneer in the Cherokee Strip of Oklahoma, was a homesteader and farmer there for a number of years, but finally moved across the line to Arkansas City, where he had become prominent in financial and business affairs. Mr. Bardo is of an old Pennsylvania family. The lineage goes back originally to France. Four brothers of the name during the turbulent times that led to the French Revolution came from France and landed in Pennsylvania, and from there their families became widely scattered. One of the number, Abraham Bardo, settled near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and left two sons, Abraham and Daniel. The latter was W. C. Bardo’s paternal grandfather and was born in Pennsylvania in about 1790. Daniel Bardo and his wife in about 1820 moved to that part of Pennsylvania later organized into Penn Township of Lycoming County, and he had to make a road through the forest to reach his homestead. The emigrants left the river bottoms, for the “hills, big trees, good lands” was their motto. Daniel Bardo lived the sturdy life of a farmer, and died there in 1863. His wife, Catherine (Sellers) Bardo, died in Lycoming County when ninety-six years of age. Seven children were born in the pioneer home of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Bardo. They were George, Sarah, Samuel, Anna, John G., Jacob and Mary. John G. Bardo was born in 1827, and married a school teacher, Savilla Baker, who was born November 11, 1828, near the Town of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, a danghter of Samuel and Hannah Baker. John...

Biography of Robert E. Lawrence

Robert E. Lawrence was one of the pioneers and one of the important upbuilders of the City of Wichita. The land he pre-empted from the Government and used for farming and stock raising purposes many years is now included within the city limits, and much of it is built over with residences, business houses and institutions. By strenuous effort and much self denial in early days, he acquired a liberal prosperity, but dispensed it liberally and left his impress on much of the city’s progress. He was of New England birth and ancestry, and was born at Canaan, Connecticut, December 17, 1847. He died at Wichita January 28, 1911, after a long and useful career. He grew up on a farm, graduated from a boarding school in Southwestern Massachusetts, and at the age of twenty-two, in 1869, started for the West. He left Massachusetts with only $2.50 in money. He possessed some of the Yankee ingenuity and commercial faculties which enabled him to get along in all conditions and among all sorts of people and carn a respectable livelihood. He paid his way as far as Neponset, Illinois, by selling stencils. During the winter spent at Neponset he taught school, and saved enough of his earnings to buy a pair of horses. These horses he drove through to Wichita and arrived in that frontier village in May, 1870. He at once preempted 160 acres and made that the scene of his first undertaking as a Kansas farmer. That 160 acres now surrounds the Kansas State Masonic Home, and the home and grounds occupy a portion of his original quarter...

Biography of Martin E. Turner

Martin E. Turner, who has been numbered among the able representatives of the legal fraternity at Eufaula for the past decade, is now practicing successfully as a member of the firm of Turner, Turner, Harley & Paris. His birth occurred in Columbia, Missouri, on the 2d of May, 1878, his parents being George W. and Elizabeth J. (Martin) Turner, both of whom were also natives of that state, where the father followed general agricultural pursuits throughout his entire business career. During the period of the Civil war he was captured while endeavoring to reach Price’s army and was incarcerated in Andersonville prison for a short time. He passed away on the 26th of November, 1893, but is still survived by his widow, who now resides in Oklahoma City. Martin E. Turner was reared and educated o in his native city and obtained his professional training in the University of Missouri, from the law department of which institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1897-98. For a year he practiced in Columbia, Missouri, and in 1901 removed to Blackwell, Oklahoma, where he capably filled the position of city attorney for four terms. Subsequently he took up his abode at Newkirk, Oklahoma, where he engaged in the practice of law as a member of the firm of Moss & Turner until 1908, when he made his way to Oklahoma City, there following his profession as a member of the firm of Turner, Moss & McInnis until 1911. The latter year witnessed his arrival in Eufaula, where he has remained throughout the intervening period of ten years and...

Biography of Owen M. Thomas

Owen M. Thomas. The Citizens State Bank of Bronson, of which Owen M. Thomas is vice president, is an institution which had grown rapidly and prospered since it was established less than ten years ago, and its success is largely due to the character of the men entrusted with its executive management. Mr. Thomas had been actively identified with banking for ten years, both in Oklahoma and in Kansas. Though a young man, his career had apparently been one of rapid accomplishment, and he had achieved as much in ten years as many men do in their entire active life. Mr. Thomas was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, February 4, 1883, and spent much of his early youth in [p.2118] Oklahoma. His grandfather, Owen W. Thomas, was a native of Wales, afterwards became a farmer and property owner at Toulon, Illinois, where he died. Owen W. Thomas, Jr., father of the Bronson banker, was born at Toulon in Stark County, Illinois, in 1851. He grew up in his native county, and spent his brief active career as a farmer. He died at Oskaloosa, Iowa, in March, 1883, a few weeks after the birth of his son, Owen M. The maiden name of his wife was Dora Eisiminger, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1856. By her first husband she had just one child, Owen Mitchell Thomas. She afterwards married E. R. Green, and they participated as settlers on the Cherokee Strip in Oklahoma at the opening in the fall of 1893. Mr. Green made the race for a homestead and secured one of 160 acres on the Tonkawa Indian Reservation....

Kay, Helen Mae Hayden Mrs. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Mrs. Helen Kay Died Suddenly Memorial services for Mrs. Helen Mae Kay, who passed away Sunday, October 11, 1964 about noon at her apartment in the Berland building, were conducted yesterday (Wednesday) at 11 a.m. by the Bollman Funeral Home at the Enterprise Community church, with the Rev. James E. Jones officiating. Guy Craig sang “In The Garden,” and Mrs. Gail Swart was organist. Casket bearers were: Virgil Wagner, Harry Voss, Alfred Owsley, Stanley J. Farris, Gerald Homan, and Dan DeBoie, and Vault entombment was in the Enterprise cemetery, with ritual committal service by Wallowa Valley Chapter No. 50 OES. Mrs. Kay was the daughter of the late George and Mary Hayden and was born in Kildare in Kay county, Oklahoma, July 16, 1897. She came to Wallowa county with her parents about 52 years ago. On October 2, 1919 she was married to Enterprise to Ralph Drake Kay who preceded her in death on September 29, 1963. She was a member of the Community Church and of Wallowa Valley Chapter No. 50 OES and was a past matron. Mrs. Kay had suffered a heart attack a couple of years ago in California where she and her husband were spending the winter, but seemingly was in her usual health when stricken Sunday. Mrs. Kay loved music, had a charming voice and was very generous with her talent. Survivors include a son, James, of Burbank, California; a daughter, Mrs. Donald (Priscilla) Kirkman, of Oceanside, California; and six grandchildren. The son and daughter both came by plane Monday to Pendleton and were met there by Mrs. Roger...

Biography of John Falleaf

John Falleaf, a native son of Oklahoma and a representative of one of the pioneer families of the state, is widely and favorably known in Washington county, where he has spent his life, and he is now the owner of a well improved farm near Dewey. He was born ten miles east of the place upon which he now resides, his parents being Silas and Eliza Falleaf, who were natives of Kansas and made their way to Indian Territory in 1866. They were of Delaware extraction and were numbered among the earliest settlers in the territory. Mr. Falleaf acquired his education at Lawrence, Kansas, and also attended the government schools at Chilocco, Oklahoma, and after laying aside his textbooks he assisted his stepfather, Colonel Jackson, chief of the Delawares, in the cultivation of a farm near Copan, after which he started out independently and now has an allotment of thirty acres, which he is operating, while he rents the sixty-acre allotment of his son, Fred, his home being situated in the midst of a beautiful grove of trees. He has brought his land to a high state of development and has added many modern improvements to his place. He devotes his attention to the growing of corn and oats, also raising hogs and cattle, and is a practical farmer, thoroughly familiar with all the details of that occupation interested in% 9the agricultural development on his part and deeply interested in the development of the state. In 1899 Mr. Falleaf was united in marriage to Miss Ida Yellowjacket, who passed away leaving four children: Fred, twenty-one years of age ;...

Biography of Mills G. Voris

Mills G. Voris is now serving his third consecutive term as register of deeds of Cowley County. His is a case of exceptional fitness for public office. He had had a wide experience in public affairs, beginning when as a boy he was elected to succeed his father as county surveyor back in Illinois. He also knows the people and conditions in the Southwest, particularly in Cowley County, and had been both a farmer and business man. He is honest, capable, competent and efficient, and the work of his office was never in better hands. Mr. Voris was born in Knox County, Illinois, November 8, 1861. His paternal ancestors were Holland people and were Colonial settlers in New York State. His great-grandfather served as an orderly under General Washington during the Revolutionary war. His grandfather, Peter Voris, was born in 1801, spent most of his active life as a farmer near Akron, Ohio, but died at Mattoon, Illinois, in 1871. Ralph Voris, father of the register of deeds, was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1829. He grew up there and in young manhood went to Knox County, Illinois, where he married. He was an old-time land surveyor, and for twenty-four years held the office of county surveyor of Knox County. During the Civil war he did recruiting duty for the Union cause. He was a republican and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Ralph Voris died in Knox County in 1885. His wife was Elizabeth Melton, who was born in Knox County in 1839 and died at Newport, Arkansas, in 1908. There were five children:...

Lee, Marshall F. – Obituary

Thursday at 10:3:00 PM funeral services will be held in the Miles Memorial Chapel for Marshall F. Lee. The Rev. Edwin W. Parker, Methodist minister, will conduct the rites. He will be taken to the Forest Park Cemetery at Anthony, KS for burial in the family plot. Graveside services are scheduled for 3 PM. Lee, 70, died Tuesday morning at his home [March 2, 1948], 1019 N Union Street. He had been in failing health for the past eight years and had been confined to a wheel chair for 16 months. Formerly in the dry cleaning business here, Lee had made his home in Ponca City since 1929. His wife, 2 sons, two sisters, a brother and 4 grandchildren survive him. The Ponca City News, March 3, 1948 Brother Dies in Oklahoma Marshall Lee, brother of Mrs. Ina Brownfield, and a former resident of Anthony, passed away Tuesday morning, March 2nd, at his home in Ponca City, Oklahoma, after a lingering illness. Funeral services will be held in Ponca City. Burial will be in Forest Park cemetery, Anthony. All arrangements have not been made at this time. The Anthony Republican, Anthony, KS, March 4, 1948 Contributed by: Shelli...

Long, Rush Ernest – Obituary

Rush Ernest Long, 86, of Pine Creek, died March 6, 2005, at his home. His memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Oxbow Christian Fellowship Church at the Oxbow Schoolhouse. Friends are invited to join the family for a reception at the church after the service. Rush Ernest was born on Sept. 3, 1918, to Elizabeth and Harry Long at Ponca City, Okla. He was raised and educated at Ponca City. His parents were ranchers until the Depression. They moved to California in 1936. In 1938 he married Mary Cecil at Compton, Calif. Early in his life he worked as an electrician helper until the war started. He then went to work in the shipyards in Portland, then to Tillamook at the blimp base. He then worked at the military hospital at White City, then to Klamath Falls to open the Marine Air Field. Shortly after arriving in Klamath Falls, the war ended. He and his family stayed in Klamath Falls until 1959 when he moved to Brookings and went into the electrical contracting business. He stayed in that position until his retirement. In his retirement he moved to his “favorite place,” Northeastern Oregon. Rush and Mary had two children, Rush L. and Cathy. Rush was a good provider. He always worked hard and brought home a good living. He was an honest man whose word was his bond — his kids learned that at an early age. If he told you something, you could count on it being true. His favorite pastimes were hunting and fishing. He was also a very good rifle shot and...

Baker, Lillian Belle Nelson Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Lillian Belle Baker, 87, passed away in Baker City, on Wednesday, July 31, 2003. Graveside services were held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 2, 2003, at Hilltop Memorial Cemetery in Nyssa. Services were under the direction of Lienkaemper Chapel, Nyssa. Lillian was born to John A. Nelson and Elizabeth Belle Curt Nelson on May 9, 1916, in Blackwell, Okla. She married Paul W. Baker on April 2, 1934, in Twin Falls, Idaho, and they moved to Nyssa in 1939. Paul died in 1971. Lillian worked for several years at Malheur Memorial Hospital in Nyssa and she moved to Baker City in 1977, she worked as the area coordinator for Meals on Wheels. She is survived by four sons, Robert and Roger Baker of Ontario, Norman Baker of Nampa, Idaho, and Terry Baker of Vancouver, Wash.; two daughters, Barbara Mefford of Ontario and Janice Danford of Baker City; 14 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren, one great-great-granddaughter and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, three brothers, one sister and one grandson. Used with permission from: The Record Courier, Baker City, Oregon, August, 2003 Transcribed by: Belva...
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