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Black Hawk’s War – Indian Wars

We have now to record the events of a war “which brought one of the noblest of Indians to the notice and admiration of the people of the United States. Black Hawk was an able and patriotic chief. With the intelligence and power to plan a great project, and to execute it, he united the lofty spirit which secures the respect and confidence of a people. He was born about the year 1767, on Rock river, Illinois. At the age of fifteen he took a scalp from the enemy, and was in consequence promoted by his tribe to the rank of a brave. Engaging soon afterwards in an expedition against the Osages, he fought several battles, highly distinguished himself, and brought back a number of trophies. His reputation being thus established, he frequently led war parties against the enemies of his tribe, and was, in almost every case, successful. The influence and experience he thus acquired were fitting him for a contest in which, though unfortunate, he was to acquire a lasting fame. The treaty concluded in 1804, by Governor Harrison, with the Sacs and Foxes, by which these tribes ceded their lands east of the Mississippi, was agreed to by a few chiefs, without the knowledge or consent of the nation. Although this gave rise to much dissatisfaction among the Indians, no outbreak occurred, until the United States government erected Fort Madison upon the Mississippi. An attempt was then made to cut off the garrison, and from that time, the whites looked upon the Indians as enemies, and so treated them whenever opportunity offered. Previous to this, Illinois...

Biography of Francis Xavier Paquet

FRANCIS X. PAQUET. – Francis Xavier Paquet, son of Joseph Paquet and Marie Madaline Godant, was born in the parish of Saint John, about thirty miles west of Quebec, at the junction of the Jacquarka river with the St. Lawrence. Joseph Paquet was a stonemason by trade, but lived on a farm and took jobs of stonework. He was the father of eighteen children, nine boys and nine girls. F.X. Paquet, the sixteenth child in order, was born on the fifteenth day of January, 1811. He learned the trade of shipbuilding at Quebec, being apprenticed to Peter Labbe when not quite fourteen years of age. When seventeen years of age, he emigrated to the Untied States, engaging himself to the American Fur Company, to go to Mackinaw and construct a schooner for said company. After the schooner was completed he took charge of her and engaged in boating wood from Linwood Island and Round Island, and also made a trip to Chicago to get oak timber for staves and for building small boats called Mackinaw boats. This schooner was named Eliza Stewart, after the wife of Robert Stewart, who was the head man of the American Fur Company at Mackinaw at that time. That was in 1828. Old man Beaubien was then head man at what was afterwards Chicago, and which then consisted of three or four small log houses, one being a storehouse, and another being occupied by men who were employed getting out staves and making lumber with ship-saws. These staves were for making five-gallon kegs to hold and transport alcohol, out of which whisky was made...

Stone Lined Graves – Jo Daviess County, Illinois

A very remarkable example of rectangular stone inclosure was discovered in a mound on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi, in the town of Dunleith Jo Daviess County, Illinois. This is the extreme northwest corner of the State, and the mound was one of a large group. Its height was about 10 feet, with a diameter of 65 feet. To quote the description of the interior: ” The first six feet from the top consisted of hard gray earth. This covered a vault built in part of stone and in part of round logs. When fully uncovered this was found to be a rectangular crypt, inside measurement showing it to be thirteen feet long and seven feet wide. The four straight, surrounding walls were built of small unhewn stones to the height of three feet and a foot or more in thickness. Three feet from each end was a cross wall or partition of like character, thus leaving a central chamber seven feet square, and a narrow cell at each end about two feet wide and seven feet long, This had been entirely covered with a single laver of round logs, varying in diameter from six to twelve inches, laid close together side by side across the width of the vault, the ends resting upon and extending to uneven lengths beyond the side walls.” In the central space were 11 human skeletons, as indicated in the drawings, figure 8 showing a section of the mound and figure 9 a ground plan of the inclosure. “They had all apparently been interred at one time as they were found arranged in a...

Biographical Sketch of T. B. Johns

T. B. Johns, farmer, P. O. Athens, was born in Galena, Ill., April 8, 1841. In 186l he went to California, and back to Nevada in 1862; thence to Utah; thence to Idaho; thence to British Columbia; thence to Oregon; thence to Montana; thence to Wyoming; thence back to Utah; thence to Prescott, Arizona, back to Nevada, and again back to Illinois; thence to Queenstown, Ireland, and back to the United States, settling at Abilene, Kan., in 1871. Came to Jewell County in October 1871, and is now the owner of 240 acres of land. Mr. Johns has been an extensive traveler, but becoming tired of traveling has for the past eleven years lived in Jewell County, and has found the soil of Kansas productive. Has held the office of Township Trustee. Was married in February, 1872, in Jewell County, to Miss Claire Farren; they have four children – Thomas C., Richard S., Carrie, and...

Kiddle, E. E. – Obituary

Island City, Union County, Oregon E. E. Kiddle Died Tuesday Morning State highway commissioner Edward E. Kiddle died suddenly at his home in Island City at 4:30 o’clock Tuesday morning of this week. Death was due to acute indigestion and neuralgia of the heart. Mr. Kiddle was one of the best known men in Oregon, having represented Union and Wallowa counties in the state senate and since the death of highway commissioner Burgess, he has served by appointment of Governor Olcott as a member of the state highway commission. He had returned from the national capital where he had been in conference with highway commissioners from different states only a few days before his death. Mr. Kiddle was a native of Illinois, born at Warren in 1862. He was married to Miss Emma Walling at Hamilton, Mo., in 1884 and came to Oregon two years later. Settling at Union he engaged in the milling business. Later he removed to Island City and has since been one of the firm of a milling company at that place. Two sons, two daughters and the widow are the immediate surviving relatives. Funeral services were held at Island City Thursday afternoon and interment was in the cemetery at that town. North Powder News Saturday, January 1,...

Frank Elmer Todd of Visalia CA

Frank Elmer Todd9, (Edward P.8, Silas7, Elam6, Edmund5, Christopher4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Dec. 12, 1858, at Apple River, Ill., married Jan. 1, 1881, Mary Julia, daughter of Dr. J. S. Coleman, who was born Sept. 7, 1860, in Marysville, Mo. Their children were all born in Cherryvale, Kan. They lived in Visalia, Tulare County, Calif. Children: 2659. Harland Arthur, b. Dec. 12, 1882; he is a physician and surgeon. *2660. Oscar Vivian, b. Jan 10, 1885. 2661. Lena Beatrice, b. April 1, 1888; a saleslady. *2662. Russell Lowell, b. July 12, 1890. 2663. Frank Bartell, b. Aug. 3,...

Ely S. Parker Homestead, Tonawanda Reservation

Ely Parker was a Seneca Indian of the Wolf Clan. He was born on the Tonawanda Seneca Reservation in 1832. His boyhood name was Hasanoanda ‘Coming to the Front’. Later he was made a chief of his clan and received the title, Do-ne-ho-ga-weh ‘He Holds The Door Open’. Ely Parker received an academic education and studied law and civil engineering. At Galena, Illinois, while he was employed as an engineer on a government project, he met Ulysses S. Grant. He became a close friend of Grant. This friendship continued till death. Ely Parker took part in the Civil War of the United States. His distinguished service in the Vicksburg Campaign was noticed by General Grant who made him a member of his staff. He rose rapidly in rank, finally becoming Brigadier General. He was Grant’s personal and official Secretary. At General Lee’s surrender it was Parker who wrote the Articles of Capitulation. In 1869 Ely Parker was appointed Commissioner of Indian Affairs. He held several important positions under the City Government of New York. General Parker was a close friend of Lewis H. Morgan, noted Ethnologist and helped him prepare his book, “League of the Iroquois” first published in 1851. The success of this book was largely due to the help of Parker who, being a chief of his people, knew the laws and customs of the Iroquois and thus was able to give Morgan valuable information, then unknown to white people. Ely Parker was a brother of Nicholas Parker or Gayeh-twa-gah’ a noted Seneca of this time. His sister, Gahano or Caroline Parker was the last woman to...

Biography of Sylvester Washington McMaster

Almost the only living individual among those earliest settlers who came to Rock Island County in the thirties and forties, when the present City of Rock Island was a small village, known as Stephenson, is Sylvester Washington McMaster, a man whom nearly every man, woman and child throughout Rock Island County knows, either personally or by reputation. He was born October 8, 1811, near Watertown, in Herkimer County, New York, and died January 22, 1908, at the age of ninety-six years. His early life was spent upon a farm and he received such education as he could in the country schools of that time. At the age of nineteen years he himself was a school teacher, having charge of the same school which he had formerly attended as a pupil. Mr. McMaster came West in 1833, traveling by water from the City of Buffalo in his native State. The canal at that time was completed from Cleveland, Ohio, to Portsmouth, in the same state, and connecting with the Ohio River. Coming first to Cairo, Illinois, Mr. McMaster proceeded to St. Louis, and from thence to Galena, Illinois, on the Mississippi. At that early day there were but few houses in the village of Stephenson, and but one in what is now Davenport, that of Antoine LeClaire. Mr. McMaster spent two years (1833 and 1834) at Galena and then returned to St. Louis, where he spent about two years, from there coming to Stephenson again, and here he made his home until 1841. During this time he was engaged in the mercantile business. He also served one term as assessor....
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