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Biographical Sketch of D. H. Dillon

D. H. Dillon, merchant, P. O. North Branch, was born in Keokuk County, Iowa, October 12, 1846. Enlisted in the United States army, in Company A, Forty-eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. Came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1873, and took a homestead ten miles northwest of Burr Oak, in Walnut Township. In the spring of 1878 Mr. Dillon established himself in business, carrying a general stock of goods. He built a building in 1882, 22×40 feet, and has the same well filled with goods. He was appointed postmaster in May 1878, and named the office North Branch. With Malen Lamb, he has laid out a town, which they called after the post office. He was married in Warren County, Iowa, April 30, 1866, to Miss Emma...

Biography of Anson S. Cooke, Hon.

Hon. Anson S. Cooke. A resident of Kansas during a period of forty-five years, a pioneer of the prairies of Mitchell County, and for twelve years a member of the State Senate, Hon. Anson S. Cooke is well and favorably known in various parts of the commonwealth, and particularly so at Topeka where he now is living in retirement. During his long and useful career he has risen from poverty to affluence and from obscurity to prominence, and while engaged steadfastly and successfully in the promotion of his personal interests has also contributed to the welfare of the state which has so long been his home. Senator Cooke was born August 13, 1849, in Lake County, Illinois, a son of Daniel G. Cooke. The family is of Quaker stock, with all the sterling characteristics of that creed, and originated in this country in New England, from whence came David Cooke, the grandfather of Anson S. David Cooke was an early settler of Oneida County, New York, arriving there at a time when the country was still new and wild game abundant, the bears being so numerous that it was almost impossible to raise livestock with any degree of success. Senator Cooke says that he has frequently heard his grandfather tell of driving them out of his hog pen. Daniel G. Cooke, father of the senator, was born in 1822, in Oneida County, New York, and was married in 1845 to Miss Mary Lavina Simonds, a daughter of D. J. Simonds. Mr. Simonds was for some years a well-known farmer of Lake County, Illinois, but later moved to Wisconsin, after...

Biography of George L. Atkeson

George L. Atkeson. To those parents who value the intellectual development of their children, it is a matter of vital importance that in the early and formative period of their lives, their instructors in the public schools should be thoroughly qualified for such responsibility in scholarly attainments and in personal character. In securing so widely known and so experienced an educator as George L. Atkeson as superintendent of their city schools, the good people of Altoona, Kansas, displayed exceptional wisdom. Intelligent public opinion here, as at other points, makes more insistent demands, asks for more decided results than in old days, a realization having come that the needs of future generations must not be imperiled by any narrowing of public school education in the present. A wider and deeper service is demanded than ever before, and to this field of effort a welcome is given the able, the understanding, the progressive educational leader, a worthy example of this class being found in George L. Atkeson. He is a native of Missouri, born near Tipton, in Morgan County, September 20, 1866. His parents were Francis M. and Mary A. (Frye) Atkeson. Francis M. Atkeson was born in 1830, near Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia, in which section the early ancestors of the family had settled after coming from England. His father, Andrew Atkeson, was also born in what is now West Virginia, and from there, probably in 1832, removed with his family to Morgan County, Missouri. He became a farmer there and operated the first blacksmith shop in Tipton. Practically Francis M. Atkeson spent his entire life near Tipton,...

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