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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Harry

Jacob Harry, farmer and stock; P. O. Humbolt; the subject of this sketch was born in Preble Co., Ohio, Jan. 14, 1816; he married Miss Susannah Tobey, Aug. 1, 1839; she was born in Washington Co., Md., Dec. 15, 1819. They had eleven children, nine living, viz., Jefferson, Madison and Amanda, Hiram, Nathaniel, Franklin, Clinton, Stephen A. D. and Nelson. He lived in Ohio until 1855; he was raised on the farm and also learned the brickmason’s trade; he then went west, visited Kansas and finally settled in Callaway Co., Mo., near Jefferson City, where he engaged in farming, remaining one year; he then, in 1856, came to Coles Co., Ill., and settled in Humbolt Tp., where he farmed until 1865, when he came to his present place; in 1867, he was elected Supervisor of Seven Hickory Tp., and held the office for three terms; heowns 167 acres in the township; his parents, Jacob and Mrs. Mary Davis Harry, were natives of North Carolina, where they were married; they moved to Ohio in 1811, where both have since...

Biography of Oliver P. Goodall

OLIVER P. GOODALL. – Mr. Goodall, one of our best men in developing Oregon, was born in Jefferson City, Missouri, August, 1828, and grew up on a farm, securing a common-school education. At the age of eighteen he left school and joined Colonel William Bent, and spent the winter of 1846-47 at Bent’s fort on the Arkansas river, in the capacity of clerk. He there met with continuous adventures, associating with such old mountaineers as Kit and Bob Carson, Bridger, the Calloways, Bill Williams, Dick Dallam, Black Dick Curtis and others; and his recitals of their brave and daring deeds and endurance would fill a volume. In 1847 he went to Mexico in the quartermaster’s employ as courier, wagon-master, clerk, and interpreter of Spanish, under Major Sprague, General Howard and others, and remained in Mexico, New Mexico and Texas until the fall of 1849. He met with numerous adventures with Apaches, Mexican guerillas and Comanches, and buried many brave comrades, and was even obliged to leave some unburied. He carries scars in remembrance of Indian arrows, and has vivid recollections of many perils, having been by the side of Major Stein when he was shot in the Sierra Blanco Mountains, where his two bosom companions, Joe Allison and Jim McAllister of Missouri, were left unburied. He also recollects affairs of interest in connection with the Seminole chief, Wildcat, and his sub-chief, Gopher John, a coal-black Negro, campaigning on the Mexican border. In October, 1849, Mr. Goodall was engaged in prospecting for gold in Southern California. In 1850 he had reached El Paso del Norte, and entered the quartermaster’s service....

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