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Indian Wars of Carolina – Previous to the Revolution

When the English settled in South Carolina, it was found that the State was inhabited by about twenty different tribes of Indians. The whites made gradual encroachments without meeting with any opposition from the Indians, until the latter saw that if these advances were continued, they would be completely driven from their country. A struggle was immediately begun, in which the colonists suffered so much from the number and fury of their enemies that a price was fixed upon every Indian who should be brought captive to Charleston, from whence they were sold into slavery for the West Indies. The hostility of the southern Indians was instigated by the Spaniards, who supplied them with arms and ammunition. In the year 1702, Governor Moore marched into the country of the Appalachian Indians, took a great number of prisoners, and compelled the remainder to submit to the supremacy of the English government. A more important contest occurred in 1712. The Tuscaroras, and other powerful tribes, whose country extended from Cape Fear River to the peninsula of Florida, united in a league, the object of which was, to wage a war of extermination against the whites. Every part of the design was laid with secrecy and ingenuity. They fortified their principal village, in order to shelter their women and children, and there the warriors met and matured their scheme. When the favorable moment arrived, they scattered in small bands, and entering the houses of the planters, demanded something to eat. They then murmured at the provisions set before them, and pretending to be angry, they immediately began to murder men, women, and...

Slave Narrative of Eliza Scantling

Interviewer: Phoebe Faucette Person Interviewed: Eliza Scantling Location: Scotia, South Carolina Age: 87 “If you wants to know about de slavery times,” said old Aunt Eliza, “you’se sure come to de right person; ’cause I wuz right dere.” The statement was easy to believe; for old Aunt Eliza’s wrinkled face and stiff, bent form bore testimony to the fact that she had been here for many a year. As she sat one cold afternoon in December before her fire of fat lightwood knots, in her one-room cabin, she quickly went back to her childhood days. Her cabin walls and floor were filled with large cracks through which the wind came blowing in. “I gits along pretty good. My chillun lives all around here, and my granddaughter that’s a-standin’ at the window dere, takes care of me. Den de government helps me out. It sure is a blessing, too—to have sech a good government! And ‘Miss Maggie’ good to me. She brought me dis wood. Brought it in her truck herself. Had a colored man along to handle it for her. But I so stiff I sometimes kin hardly move from me waist down. And sometimes in de morning when I wake, it is all I kin do to get up an’ wash me face. But I got to do it. My granddaughter bring me my meals. “I is 87 years old. I know ’cause I wuz so high when de war broke out. An’ I plowed my January to July de year ‘fore peace declare. I remember dat. I wuz a good big girl; but jes’ a child—not married...

Slave Narrative of Daphney Wright

Interviewer: Phoebe Faucette Person Interviewed: Daphney Wright Location: Scotia, South Carolina Age: 106 106 Year Old Ex-Slave Just around the bend from the old mill pond on the way to Davis Swimming Pool lives a very old negro woman. Her name is Daphney Wright, though that name has never been heard by those who affectionately know her as “Aunt Affie”. She says she is 106 years old. She comes to the door without a cane and greets her guests with accustomed curtsey. She is neatly dressed and still wears a fresh white cap as she did when she worked for the white folks. Save for her wearing glasses and walking slowly, there are no evidences of illness or infirmities. She has a sturdy frame, and a kindly face shows through the wrinkles. “I been livin’ in Beaufort when de war fust (first) break out”, she begins. “Mr. Robert Cally was my marsa. Dat wuz in October. De Southern soldiers come through Bluffton on a Wednesday and tell de white folks must get out de way, de Yankees right behind ’em! De summer place been at Bluffton. De plantation wuz ten miles away. After we refugee from Bluffton, we spent de fust night at Jonesville. From dere we went to Hardeeville. We got here on Saturday evening. You know we had to ride by horses—in wagons an’ buggies. Dere weren’t no railroads or cars den. Dat why it take so long. “Mr. Lawrence McKenzie wuz my Missus’ child. We stayed wid him awhile, ’til he find us a place. Got us a little house. We stayed four years dere, ’til...

Slave Narrative of William Sherman

Interviewer: J. M. Johnson Person Interviewed: William Sherman Location: Chaseville, Florida In Chaseville, Florida, about twelve miles from Jacksonville on the south side of the Saint Johns River lives William Sherman (locally pronounced Schumann,) a former slave of Jack Davis, nephew of President Jefferson Davis of the Confederacy. William Sherman was born on the plantation of Jack Davis, about five miles from Robertsville, South Carolina, at a place called “Black Swamp,” June 12, 1842, twenty-three years prior to Emancipation. His father who was also named William Sherman, was a free man, having bought his freedom for eighteen hundred dollars from his master, John Jones, who also lived in the vicinity of the Davis’ plantation. William Sherman, senior, bargained with his master to obtain his freedom, however, for he did not have the money to readily pay him. He hired himself out to some of the wealthy plantation owners and applied what he earned toward the payment for his freedom. He was a skilled blacksmith and cabinet maker and his services were always in demand. After procuring his freedom he bought a tract of land from his former master and built a home and blacksmith shop on it. As was the custom during slavery, a person who bought his freedom had to have a guardian; Sherman’s former master, John Jones, acted as his guardian. Under this new order of things Sherman was in reality his own master. He was not “bossed,” had his own hours, earned and kept his money, and was at liberty to leave the territory if he desired. However, he remained and married Anna Georgia, the mother...

Jasper County, South Carolina Census Records

  1790 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 Jasper County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 Jasper County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 Jasper County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 Jasper County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Jasper County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1840 Jasper County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Jasper County, South Carolina Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Jasper County, Census (images and...

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