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George B. Todd of Norfolk VA

George B. Todd8, (Frederick P.7, Thomas J.6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Oct. 24, 1867 in Plattsmouth, Neb., went with his parents when they moved to Jamestown, N. Y., married Sept. 18, 1889, in Hampton, Va., M. Rosa Hart, who was born Dec. 4, 1869. In 1920 they were living in Norfolk, Va., where he was a merchant dealing in all kinds of farm machinery, motor trucks, engines, electric light plants, water systems etc. Children: 2424. Allene Ford, b. Sept. 17, 1890, in Jamestown, N. Y., m. June, 1917, Cecil W. Tucker. 2425. George B., b. March 27, 1892, d. Dec. 26, 1894. 2426. Clarence Hart, b. July 14, 1893. *2427. Malcom Howard, b. May 9,...

Biography of George Gorden Derby

George Gorden Derby is a comparatively young man but is old in the service of railroads. He began his career in Western Pennsylvania, where he was an employee and rose to large responsibilities with the Erie Railroad. About ten years ago he came West and had since been with the Santa Fe at different points and is now superintendent of the Oklahoma division, with headquarters at Arkansas City. Mr. Derby was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, January 14, 1876. His paternal ancestors were colonial settlers in Connecticut. His father, Lafayette Derby, was born in New York State in 1844, and is now living at Meadville, Pennsylvania, retired. When fifteen years of age his parents removed to Mercer County, Pennsylvania, and later to Crawford County, where Lafayette grew up and married. His first business experience was as a grocery merchant, but subsequently he entered the employ of the Erie Railroad when that was known as the Atlantic Great Western, and was continuously in its service for thirty years. He is a republican, and had served as a member of the school board and city council at Meadville, and in the Presbyterian Church was an elder for a long time and also treasurer. Lafayette Derby is a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted in 1861 and becoming lieutenant of Company H, One Hundred Fiftieth Pennsylvania Infantry. He saw much hard service, was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness and was kept out of the fighting at Gettysburg, where his regiment played a gallant part, because of the wounds keeping him in the hospital. Lafayette Derby married Elizabeth Eleckner, who...

Biography of James Neild

JAMES NEILD – The Neild family came from the North of England. Thomas Neild, a native of Halifax, Yorkshire, England, a stone cutter by trade, now living in Jamestown, New York, was born on February 9, 1854, and came to America in 1882, locating first at Albion, New York, where he procured work in his trade. He later moved to HoVey, New York, and in 1893 came to Holyoke, Massachusetts, and entered the mill of the American Thread Company, working there for four years. After this he returned for a time to England, but later came back to America and settled in Jamestown, New York, where he has since been engaged in mill work. Soon after his arrival in this country he became an American citizen, joined the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and became an active member of the Methodist Church. Thomas Neild was married to Anna Rowlinson who, like himself, was of English birth; a native of Windhill, England, born March 9, 1850, and died in 1892. There were five children of the marriage: Frank Rowlinson, born in England. Sarah, born in England. James, of whom further. Clara. Florence. Thomas Neild married a second time and there is one son, John, of the second marriage. James Neild, son of Thomas Neild, was born in Albion, New York, March 3, 1884, educated in the schools of Holley, New York, came to Holyoke, Massachusetts, and went to work for the Farr Alpaca Company. When fifteen years of age he went to England and remained there four years in order to learn the trade of wool grading and sorting. After...

Biography of William Henry Truesdale

William Henry, fourth son of Samuel and Charity (Cummings) Truesdale, was born near Rochester, New York, October 30, 1844. His elementary education was acquired in the district school and at private academies, and he then prepared for college in the Benedict Classical School in Rochester. He took the arts course in the University of Rochester, was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and two years later the degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon him. He then commenced the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1869. He never practiced law but devoted himself to the profession of teaching. This he commenced in rural schools, and became the principal of Nunda Academy in 1870, holding the position until 1875. From 1875 to 1880 he was principal of the schools in Olean, New York, and then held a similar position in the high school at Jamestown, New York. During the time he held this latter position he also conducted a manufacturing business until 1885. The next five years were devoted to his duties as principal of the Mohawk high school, and in September, 1890, he came to Geneva, New York, as principal of the high school, and in May, 1891, was elected superintendent and principal, a position he is still filling with honor and dignity. In political matters he affiliates with the Republican party, and he is a member of the Presbyterian church. His fraternal affiliations are with the Ark Lodge, No. 33, Free and Accepted Masons of Geneva, New York; University Club; Interstate Council of School Men. Mr. Truesdale married at Rochester, New...

Weiland, Charles “Chuck” – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Charles “Chuck” Weiland, 87, a longtime Baker City resident, died Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2001, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. A family memorial service will be held at a later date. Gray’s West & Co. is in charge of arrangements. Chuck was born Feb. 22, 1914, in Jamestown, New York, to Albert and Antoinette Weiland. He was raised and educated in Rochester, N.Y., with two older brothers. On April 23, 1938, he married Evelyn Bosse, his high school sweetheart. He was a purchasing agent and later manager of Fasco Industries, a company that manufactures a variety of vent systems and electric motors. All this time Chuck indulged his pleasures in the out-of-doors, especially fishing, which he enjoyed all over the country. Chuck retired early and he and Evelyn traveled all over the lower 48 states. He moved to the Baker City area in 1985 to be near his only daughter, Joyce McKie, after his wife died Chuck made friends easily and became an Elk and a Mason. He spent most of his time with his nose in a book and a dog at his feet. His favorite chair gave him a good, close view of the deer that were always hanging around his yard. He had a lifetime passion for automobiles, especially sports cars. At times he owned two or three at once. In the Baker City area, he was probably best known for driving around in his bright red Corvette well into his 80s. He was a wonderful father and a kind man who will be missed. Survivors include his daughter, Joyce McKie, of Baker City;...

Biography of Hon. Levant F. Thompson

HON. LEVANT F. THOMPSON. – There are but few lives of the pioneer settlers of the many communities upon the Pacific slope which illustrate in a greater degree than does that of the subject of this sketch the varied experiences of those who lay the bases of future commonwealths; the motives under-lying action; the vicissitudes which mold and alter resolution; and the patient waiting for the reward of following sagacious and far-seeing judgment in the adoption of location. Here is a man who was comparatively denied the education of the schools; who has assimilated practical knowledge as he struggles with life, and profits by what is passing around him; who makes no claim to pre-eminent ability, intellectually or physically; who assumes no superiority because of gifts or advantages; but who, with only proper self-reliance, simply, steadily obeys the dictates of intuitive good judgment so aptly described in our Western unabridged language as “horse sense.” yet Mr. Thompson is a state-builder, the impress of his life being plainly stamped upon the embryo settlements of Pierce county and the State of Washington; and his works will live after him. Perhaps “he builded wiser than he knew'” for he did not seem ambitious for public recognition, and never sought public honors nor offices. When he did serve the public, it was he who was sought. He was unpretentious, unassuming. Indeed, his innate diffidence made him the counselor in retirement rather than the public leader. He was sent to the first territorial house of representatives of Washington in 1854. Thirty-five years later, without his solicitation, and unknown to him until after his nomination,...
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